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Linnell, M. (2019). Governing (through) anticipation, architecture, affect. In: : . Paper presented at 14th Conference of the European Sociological Association, Manchester, 20-23 August, 2019.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Governing (through) anticipation, architecture, affect
2019 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The perceived increase in and transformation of societal insecurities necessitates novel approaches for governing societal responses tofuture disruption (e.g. O’Malley, 2008). One such novel approach is the establishing of public disaster simulation centres to ensure avigilant and prepared population. Societal insecurities do not necessarily mean trans-boundary or de-localized modern risks (in Beck’s,2009, sense), but may just as well imply threats to geographically delimited communities, societies, and regions, for example natureinduced(yet social) disasters like earthquakes and tsunamis, and insecurities originating from extreme weather conditions due to climatechange (e.g. hurricanes, heatwaves, landslides, flooding). This paper presents a case of public simulation centres understood as amanifestation of the Foucauldian notion of self-technology, emphasizing, as it does, the modification of individual conduct: Not only skillsbut also attitudes must be aligned towards the overarching goal of preparedness (Foucault, 1988:18). Based on a diverse assemblage ofempirical sources (e.g. individual’s accounts of their simulation experiences, notes from sensuous ethnographic field work, andgovernmental rationalizing of the need for public simulation centres), the paper puts forward an analysis of the mechanisms andtechnologies by which individuals become “resilient”. One overall tentative conclusion is that the sensuous-affective experiences conveyedby the simulation (like excitement, thrill, discomfort, stress) are intended to have an empowering effect on the participants.

National Category
Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-37202 (URN)
Conference
14th Conference of the European Sociological Association, Manchester, 20-23 August, 2019
Available from: 2019-09-12 Created: 2019-09-12 Last updated: 2019-09-12
Linnell, M. (2019). Governing (through) anticipation, vigilance, affect. In: : . Paper presented at The 4th Northern European Conference on Emergency and Disaster Studies, NEEDS 2019, Uppsala, June 10-12, 2019.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Governing (through) anticipation, vigilance, affect
2019 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The perceived increase in and transformation of societal insecurities necessitates novelapproaches for governing societal responses to future disruption (e.g. O’Malley, 2008). Onesuch novel approach is the establishing of public disaster simulation centres to ensure avigilant and prepared population. Societal insecurities do not necessarily mean transboundaryor de-localized modern risks (in Beck’s, 2009, sense), but may just as well implythreats to geographically delimited communities, societies, and regions, for example natureinduced(yet social) disasters like earthquakes and tsunamis, and insecurities originating fromextreme weather conditions due to climate change (e.g. hurricanes, heatwaves, landslides,flooding). This paper presents a case of public simulation centres understood as amanifestation of the Foucauldian notion of self-technology, emphasizing, as it does, themodification of individual conduct: not only skills but also attitudes must be aligned towardsthe overarching goal of preparedness (Foucault, 1988:18). In other words, is the proliferationof public simulation centres to be understood as a concrete sign of ongoing processes ofresponsibilization? Alternatively, is it an expression of political and economic prestige: thefact that governments choose to spend huge resources on public preparedness? Based on adiverse assemblage of empirical sources (including individual’s accounts of their simulationexperiences, notes from sensuous ethnographic field work, governmental rationalizing of theneed for public simulation centres, and sketches of a giant simulation centre that was nevermaterialized), the paper puts forward an analysis of the mechanisms and technologies bywhich individuals and communities become “resilient”. One overall tentative conclusion isthat the sensuous-affective experiences conveyed by the simulation (like excitement, thrill,discomfort, stress) are intended to have an empowering effect on the participants.

National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-36767 (URN)
Conference
The 4th Northern European Conference on Emergency and Disaster Studies, NEEDS 2019, Uppsala, June 10-12, 2019
Available from: 2019-08-02 Created: 2019-08-02 Last updated: 2019-08-13Bibliographically approved
Linnell, M. (2019). Resilience in Sweden: Governance, Networks, and Learning. In: : . Paper presented at Functional Cities Conference 2019: Resilient Regions Association, Media Evolution City, Malmö, March 28,.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Resilience in Sweden: Governance, Networks, and Learning
2019 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Other academic)
National Category
Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-35908 (URN)
Conference
Functional Cities Conference 2019: Resilient Regions Association, Media Evolution City, Malmö, March 28,
Available from: 2019-03-29 Created: 2019-03-29 Last updated: 2019-05-02Bibliographically approved
Linnell, M. (2019). Resilient mottagande av flyktingar – ett europeiskt perspektiv.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Resilient mottagande av flyktingar – ett europeiskt perspektiv
2019 (Swedish)Report (Other academic)
Publisher
p. 37
Series
RCR Working Paper Series ; 2019:2
National Category
Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-36127 (URN)978-91-88947-08-6 (ISBN)
Available from: 2019-05-10 Created: 2019-05-10 Last updated: 2019-05-10Bibliographically approved
Linnell, M. (2019). The Haptic Space of Disaster. Space and Culture
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Haptic Space of Disaster
2019 (English)In: Space and Culture, ISSN 1206-3312, E-ISSN 1552-8308Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

The overall aim of this article is to contribute to discussions on the spatialization of future eventsand, in particular, on enactment as the primary contemporary response to uncertain futures.Realistically simulated disasters is an emerging feature in contemporary public preparednessexercises. The purpose of such simulations is to foster public vigilance and initiative by way ofimmersive experiences of future disasters. This new mode of experiential learning calls for newanalytical concepts that take into account the dynamic relationship between the materialityof experience and the experiencing subject. Therefore, in this article, I propose an analyticalvocabulary derived from recent interjections in visual and cultural studies, human geography,and sociology. More specifically I make use of, and extend, the notions of “haptic space” and“haptic sense” as elaborated by Bruno (2014), Fisher (2012), and Marks (2015). I apply theseconcepts to make sense of my empirical encounter with public simulation centers in Japan andTurkey. Finally, I discuss some implications of the haptic perspective in this context.

Keywords
simulation, atmosphere, experience, materiality, affect
National Category
Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-35981 (URN)10.1177/1206331219840292 (DOI)
Available from: 2019-04-10 Created: 2019-04-10 Last updated: 2019-05-02Bibliographically approved
Linnell, M. (2018). Enhancing preparedness through the haptic sense. In: : . Paper presented at The Third Northern European Conference on Emergency and Disaster Studies, NEEDS 2018, Amsterdam, The Netherlands, March 21-23, 2018.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Enhancing preparedness through the haptic sense
2018 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The overall aim of this paper is to contribute to discussions on enactment as the premier contemporary response to uncertain futures. Realistically simulated disasters is an emerging feature in contemporary public preparedness exercise programs. The purpose of such simulations is to foster public vigilance and initiative by way of immersive experiences of future disaster. This new mode of experiential learning calls for new analytical concepts that take into account the dynamic relationship between the materiality of experience and the experiencing subject. Therefore, in this paper I propose an analytical vocabulary derived from recent interjections in art theory, film studies, and human geography. More specifically, I make use of, and extend, the notions of “haptic space” and “haptic sense” as elaborated by Bruno (2014), Fisher (2003) and Marks (2015). I apply these concepts to make sense of my empirical encounter with public simulation centres in Japan and Turkey. Finally, I discuss some implications of the haptic perspective.

Keywords
Simulation, Haptic sense
National Category
Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-33385 (URN)
Conference
The Third Northern European Conference on Emergency and Disaster Studies, NEEDS 2018, Amsterdam, The Netherlands, March 21-23, 2018
Available from: 2018-03-31 Created: 2018-03-31 Last updated: 2018-04-11Bibliographically approved
Linnell, M. (2018). On the role of anticipation in risk theory. In: : . Paper presented at The 27th annual conference of the Society for Risk Analysis Europe, SRA-E: From Critical Thinking to Practical Impact, Mid Sweden University, Östersund, June 19, 2018.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>On the role of anticipation in risk theory
2018 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

On the role of anticipation in risk theory

Mikael Linnell, RCR

In this paper I discuss anticipation as a key concept in regard to the more established

notions of risk and uncertainty. I argue that anticipation, although closely associated

with the notion of risk, has for a long time remained undertheorized (e.g. Gasparini,

2004:340; Poli, 2014:23, 2017:3). The overall purpose of the paper is thus to illustrate

the fact that anticipation may function as a mediating phenomenon between our

understanding of risk and our concrete practices for coping with uncertain futures. As

have been argued by Adams et al. (2009:246), “one defining quality of our current

moment is its characteristic state of anticipation, of thinking and living toward the

future”. Moreover, Granjou et al. (2017:1), point to a number of recent scholarly

themes, “ranging from an enduring assessment of the ‘not yet’ to the contested

prefiguring of the ‘what if’”, which seems indicative of what might be a reinvigorated

‘futures turn’. This view is shared by Levitas (2013), Nowotny (2016) and Poli (2014),

among others, who note that anticipation is at the heart of urgent risk-related debates,

from climate change to economic crisis. Accordingly, there is obviously reason for

some trans-disciplinary attention to and development of risk theory. In particular, we

need to understand better how to engage with the complexity of anticipation and

explore the knowledge practices associated with future-oriented approaches (e.g.

Adam, 2011; Brown et al., 2000; Mallard and Lakoff, 2011). According to Szerszynski

(2015), what is lacking is a systematic approach to ‘anticipatory regimes’ that enables

us to study how anticipation is understood and practiced in different social formations.

This paper is an attempt in this direction. Although a plethora of recent studies on risk

and risk management focus on the ways in which various actors imagine future

problems and seek to render them governable, the typical “governmental” study of

risk appears to have more or less moved on (O’Malley, 2016:110). Perhaps the

governmentality perspective, as we have come to know it, has now become

normalized and appears as “the ghost in the machinery of a good deal of

contemporary risk analysis – still present, but increasingly invisible” (O’Malley,

2016:110).

National Category
Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-35907 (URN)
Conference
The 27th annual conference of the Society for Risk Analysis Europe, SRA-E: From Critical Thinking to Practical Impact, Mid Sweden University, Östersund, June 19, 2018
Available from: 2019-03-29 Created: 2019-03-29 Last updated: 2019-06-19Bibliographically approved
Linnell, M. (2015). Att iscensätta apokalypsen: Zombiemetaforer i den samtida katastrofberedskapen. Sociologisk forskning, 52(2), 155-179
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Att iscensätta apokalypsen: Zombiemetaforer i den samtida katastrofberedskapen
2015 (Swedish)In: Sociologisk forskning, ISSN 0038-0342, Vol. 52, no 2, p. 155-179Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Since the turn of the millennium, enactment of possible emergencies and catastrophes has become

a most common way of producing knowledge about events yet to occur. Preparedness exercises

are frequently performed by public authorities at local and regional levels. Collaborative

approaches among relevant actors are enhanced and evaluated through simulated accidents and

acts of terror as well as school shootings and epidemic outbreaks. Due to the incalculability of

many modern threats, enactment is employed as a method for rendering potential future events

available as empirical phenomena. However, sometimes these potential futures are represented

in ways that correspond only to imagined and fictional worlds. The aim of this article is to explore

the enactment of unreal possibilities in contemporary preparedness exercises. The empirical

material employed for this purpose consists of crisis plans and exercise guides used in public

and official institutions in the United States as well as qualitative interviews with municipal

safety coordinators in Sweden.

Keywords
Enactment, Irrealis, Metaphors, Preparedness, Uncertainty, Zombies
National Category
Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-25264 (URN)000358107800004 ()2-s2.0-84982243209 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2015-06-25 Created: 2015-06-25 Last updated: 2017-07-04Bibliographically approved
Linnell, M. (2015). Cultures of preparedness: imagining and enacting disasters to come. A brief ethnography.. In: : . Paper presented at ESA 2015 12th Conference of the European Sociological Association.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cultures of preparedness: imagining and enacting disasters to come. A brief ethnography.
2015 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Knowledge about, and preparedness for, possible future disasters are created through various techniques. Via simulation of imagined events, not yet substantialised disasters can be rendered physically and cognitively accessible as objects of knowledge. Simulations can be theoretical and immaterial, created by way of computer programs, or they can be enacted as material full scale exercises, complete with a backdrop of the complex and disordered reality, and all the sensorial experiences associated with it. In either case, simulation is employed as a technique for reducing uncertainty about possible future harm. Simulation thus allows for imagining potential futures in order to manage their consequences (Lentzos and Rose 2009:236). The aim of this paper is to critically investigate the “doing” of preparedness, by way of practically engaging with the physical world, in two geographically and culturally very different contexts. In Tokyo, Japan, citizens awaiting “the big one” are requested to practice earthquake preparedness in government sponsored earthquake prevention centres, whereas in Tafjord, Norway, visitors of the local rockslide centre can “design their own rockslide” as a playful way of practicing their disaster imagination. The question posed in this paper concerns how possible future disasters are imagined, represented, and socially enacted in order to enhance individual and collective preparedness supposed to last for decades. A common feature to the two empirical sites is the fact that, sooner or later, they will be destroyed. Consequently, the challenge is to produce a culture of preparedness durable for an unspecified range of time and conveyed over generations.

National Category
Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-25811 (URN)
Conference
ESA 2015 12th Conference of the European Sociological Association
Available from: 2015-08-28 Created: 2015-08-28 Last updated: 2015-10-13Bibliographically approved
Linnell, M., Johansson, C., Olofsson, A., Wall, E. & Öhman, S. (2015). Enhancing public resilience: A community approach. Planet@Risk, 3(1), 33-44
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Enhancing public resilience: A community approach
Show others...
2015 (English)In: Planet@Risk, ISSN 2296-8172, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 33-44Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The overall aim of the paper is to explore two key areas in crisis management: (a) the role of local communities in crisis preparedness and response, and (b) how to involve the citizens in this task.Specifically we ask: What areas are important to develop in order for public resilience to be enhanced? The study has a broad scope and utilizes a novel design since it takes four stakeholder perspectives into consideration: the perspectives of municipal safety coordinators, members of voluntary organizations, semiorganized individuals, and nonorganized individuals. In total 33 in-depth interviews were undertaken in three different Swedish municiplaities.Seven major themes related to enhanced public resilience were developed in the analytic process: a) Collaboration: formal and informal practices, b) Specific competences and general abilities, c) Collective efforts and individual self help, d) Education and empowerment, e) Traditional communication versus digital media, f) Individual motivation and involvement, and g) Generation and age. From these themes four policy-level recommendations aimed for civil servants and similar public authority representatives. The recommendations consist of four key words, or ‘The four In:s; Inclusive, Interested, Insistent, and Inventive’. The study is part of an extensive research project, Public Empowerment Policies for Crisis Management, funded as part of the European Community's Seventh Framework Program.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Davos: Global Risk Forum, 2015
Keywords
public empowerment, crisis management, resilience, community, collaboration
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-24559 (URN)DEMICOM (Local ID)DEMICOM (Archive number)DEMICOM (OAI)
Funder
EU, FP7, Seventh Framework Programme, 284927
Available from: 2015-03-13 Created: 2015-03-13 Last updated: 2015-03-25Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-4011-8954

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