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Sellström, Eva
Publications (10 of 36) Show all publications
Nordenmark, M., Gillander Gådin, K., Selander, J., Sjödin, J. & Sellström, E. (2015). Self-rated health among young Europeans not in employment, education or training-with a focus on the conventionally unemployed and the disengaged. Vulnerable Groups & Inclusion, 6, Article ID 25824.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Self-rated health among young Europeans not in employment, education or training-with a focus on the conventionally unemployed and the disengaged
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2015 (English)In: Vulnerable Groups & Inclusion, ISSN 2000-8023, E-ISSN 2000-8023, Vol. 6, article id 25824Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

NEET is an acronym for Not in Employment, Education or Training. For the year 2010, it isestimated that 12.5% of all young people aged 1524 in the OECD countries could be categorised as NEETs. Within this group, various subgroups of NEET are identified. Our study, which was conducted using cross-sectional data collected through the European Social Survey, focuses on the category of people who are assumed to be most marginalised and inactive: ‘‘the disengaged.’’ Participants in the study were men and women aged 1830, originating from 33 European countries. The results show that disengaged NEETs reported poorer health than both young people who were conventionally unemployed and those in employment or studying. It is also shown that ‘‘the disengaged’’ scored worse on other social and welfare variables, for example, trust and social activity. Being disengaged is discussed in relation to the gross domestic products of the different countries.

Keywords
NEET; conventionally unemployed; disengaged; GDP; gender
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-26087 (URN)10.3402/vgi.v6.25824 (DOI)
Available from: 2015-10-16 Created: 2015-10-16 Last updated: 2017-12-01Bibliographically approved
Carlsund, Å., Asplund, K., Sellström, E. & Eriksson, U. (2014). Swedish Parent’s Experiences of Joint Physical Custody. Open Family Studies Journal, 6, 1-7
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Swedish Parent’s Experiences of Joint Physical Custody
2014 (English)In: Open Family Studies Journal, ISSN 1874-9224, Vol. 6, p. 1-7Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Abstract: Aim: This study’s aim was to learn more about parent experiences, when living in joint physical custody with their children. Methods: The study design was descriptive, using a qualitative approach. Interviews were conducted with 28 parents who lived in joint physical custody with their children. Content was analysed using inductive content analysis. Results: Participants with joint custody reported many positive experiences, and a similar process of adapting to the new living- arrangement. Results indicate that shortly after the separation parents were mainly occupied with emotional reactions to the new family situation. After two to three years, or in some cases longer, things seemed to settle down and the participants became more accustomed to the arrangements. Conclusion: This qualitative study provides insights into parents’ experiences of living in joint physical custody with their children. Many positive experiences and a similar process of adapting to the new arrangement were revealed. In the initial period, the parents seemed mainly to have been occupied with emotional reactions to the new family situation.

Keywords
Content analysis, experiences, family, joint physical custody, parents, qualitative, well-being
National Category
Other Medical Sciences not elsewhere specified
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-35083 (URN)10.2174/1874922401406010001 (DOI)
Available from: 2018-12-06 Created: 2018-12-06 Last updated: 2018-12-06Bibliographically approved
Thomson, H., Thomas, S., Sellström, E. & Petticrew, M. (2013). Housing improvements for health and associated socio-economic outcomes. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (2), Art. No. CD008657
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Housing improvements for health and associated socio-economic outcomes
2013 (English)In: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, ISSN 1469-493X, E-ISSN 1469-493X, no 2, p. Art. No. CD008657-Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background The well established links between poor housing and poor health indicate that housing improvement may be an important mechanism through which public investment can lead to health improvement. Intervention studies which have assessed the health impacts of housing improvements are an important data resource to test assumptions about the potential for health improvement. Evaluations may not detect long term health impacts due to limited follow-up periods. Impacts on socio-economic determinants of health may be a valuable proxy indication of the potential for longer term health impacts. Objectives To assess the health and social impacts on residents following improvements to the physical fabric of housing. Search methods Twenty seven academic and grey literature bibliographic databases were searched for housing intervention studies from 1887 to July 2012 (ASSIA; Avery Index; CAB Abstracts; The Campbell Library; CINAHL; The Cochrane Library; COPAC; DH-DATA: Health Admin; EMBASE; Geobase; Global Health; IBSS; ICONDA; MEDLINE; MEDLINE In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations; NTIS; PAIS; PLANEX; PsycINFO; RIBA; SCIE; Sociological Abstracts; Social Science Citations Index; Science Citations Index expanded; SIGLE; SPECTR). Twelve Scandinavian grey literature and policy databases (Libris; SveMed+; Libris uppsok; DIVA; Artikelsok; NORART; DEFF; AKF; DSI; SBI; Statens Institut for Folkesundhed; Social.dk) and 23 relevant websites were searched. In addition, a request to topic experts was issued for details of relevant studies. Searches were not restricted by language or publication status. Selection criteria Studies which assessed change in any health outcome following housing improvement were included. This included experimental studies and uncontrolled studies. Cross-sectional studies were excluded as correlations are not able to shed light on changes in outcomes. Studies reporting only socio-economic outcomes or indirect measures of health, such as health service use, were excluded. All housing improvements which involved a physical improvement to the fabric of the house were included. Excluded interventions were improvements to mobile homes; modifications for mobility or medical reasons; air quality; lead removal; radon exposure reduction; allergen reduction or removal; and furniture or equipment. Where an improvement included one of these in addition to an included intervention the study was included in the review. Studies were not excluded on the basis of date, location, or language. Data collection and analysis Studies were independently screened and critically appraised by two review authors. Study quality was assessed using the risk of bias tool and the Hamilton tool to accommodate non-experimental and uncontrolled studies. Health and socio-economic impact data were extracted by one review author and checked by a second review author. Studies were grouped according to broad intervention categories, date, and context before synthesis. Where possible, standardized effect estimates were calculated and statistically pooled. Where meta-analysis was not appropriate the data were tabulated and synthesized narratively following a cross-study examination of reported impacts and study characteristics. Qualitative data were summarized using a logic model to map reported impacts and links to health impacts; quantitative data were incorporated into the model. Main results Thirty-nine studies which reported quantitative or qualitative data, or both, were included in the review. Thirty-three quantitative studies were identified. This included five randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and 10 non-experimental studies of warmth improvements, 12 non-experimental studies of rehousing or retrofitting, three non-experimental studies of provision of basic improvements in low or mIddle Income countries (LMIC), and three non-experimental historical studies of rehousing from slums. Fourteen quantitative studies (42.4%) were assessed to be poor quality and were not included in the synthesis. Twelve studies reporting qualitative data were identified. These were studies of warmth improvements (n = 7) and rehousing (n = 5). Three qualitative studies were excluded from the synthesis due to lack of clarity of methods. Six of the included qualitative studies also reported quantitative data which was included in the review. Very little quantitative synthesis was possible as the data were not amenable tometa-analysis. This was largely due to extreme heterogeneity both methodologically as well as because of variations in the intervention, samples, context, and outcome; these variations remained even following grouping of interventions and outcomes. In addition, few studies reported data that were amenable to calculation of standardized effect sizes. The data were synthesised narratively. Data from studies of warmth and energy efficiency interventions suggested that improvements in general health, respiratory health, and mental health are possible. Studies which targeted those with inadequate warmth and existing chronic respiratory disease were most likely to report health improvement. Impacts following housing-led neighbourhood renewal were less clear; these interventions targeted areas rather than individual households in most need. Two poorer quality LMIC studies reported unclear or small health improvements. One better quality study of rehousing from slums (pre-1960) reported some improvement in mental health. There were few reports of adverse health impacts following housing improvement. A small number of studies gathered data on social and socioeconomic impacts associated with housing improvement. Warmth improvements were associated with increased usable space, increased privacy, and improved social relationships; absences from work or school due to illness were also reduced. Very few studies reported differential impacts relevant to equity issues, and what data were reported were not amenable to synthesis. Authors' conclusions Housing investment which improves thermal comfort in the home can lead to health improvements, especially where the improvements are targeted at those with inadequate warmth and those with chronic respiratory disease. The health impacts of programmes which deliver improvements across areas and do not target according to levels of individual need were less clear, but reported impacts at an area level may conceal health improvements for those with the greatest potential to benefit. Best available evidence indicates that housing which is an appropriate size for the householders and is affordable to heat is linked to improved health and may promote improved social relationships within and beyond the household. In addition, there is some suggestion that provision of adequate, affordable warmth may reduce absences from school or work. While many of the interventions were targeted at low income groups, a near absence of reporting differential impacts prevented analysis of the potential for housing improvement to impact on social and economic inequalities.

National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-18683 (URN)10.1002/14651858.CD008657.pub2 (DOI)000315460300008 ()2-s2.0-84878602432 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2013-04-04 Created: 2013-04-04 Last updated: 2018-02-20Bibliographically approved
Carlsund, Å., Eriksson, U., Löfstedt, P. & Sellström, E. (2013). Risk behaviour in Swedish adolescents: is shared physical custody after divorce a risk or a protective factor?. European Journal of Public Health, 23(1), 3-8
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Risk behaviour in Swedish adolescents: is shared physical custody after divorce a risk or a protective factor?
2013 (English)In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 23, no 1, p. 3-8Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: The increase in shared physical custody in Sweden has been dramatic; 20 years ago only a small percentage of adolescents lived in shared physical custody, but currently ∼30% of the adolescents whose parents have separated or divorced divide their residence between parents. We hypothesized that living in shared physical custody or in a single-parent family is associated with a higher prevalence of adolescent risk behaviour than living in a two-parent family. METHODS: Data on 15-year-old adolescents from the 2005/2006 to 2009/2010 Swedish Health Behaviour in School-aged Children (HBSC) survey were analysed using logistic regression. RESULTS: Adolescents living in shared physical custody had slightly higher rates of risk behaviour compared with adolescents from two-parent families, but significantly lower rates than their counterparts from single-parent families. Their odds of being a smoker or having been drunk were 60 and 50% higher, respectively, than those of their counterparts in two-parent families. CONCLUSION: Shared physical custody after marriage break-up seems to constitute a health protective factor for adolescents' health and problem behaviour. In order to deepen our understanding of the positive and negative aspects of shared physical custody, our study should be followed by qualitative analyses and longitudinal studies of adolescents' experiences.

Keywords
Family-structure; Children; Arrangements; Immigrants; Adjustment; Outcomes; Alcohol; Sweden; Parent; Adults
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-17604 (URN)10.1093/eurpub/cks011 (DOI)000314126700003 ()22383476 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84876552314 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2012-12-06 Created: 2012-12-06 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved
Carlsund, Å., Eriksson, U. & Sellström, E. (2013). Shared physical custody after family split-up: implications for health and well-being in Swedish schoolchildren.. Acta Paediatrica, 102(3), 318-323
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Shared physical custody after family split-up: implications for health and well-being in Swedish schoolchildren.
2013 (English)In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 102, no 3, p. 318-323Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

AIM: In Sweden, shared physical custody following a parental separation has emerged as means for children to keep close relationships with both parents. Previous studies show that children benefit from regular contact with both parents, who share responsibility for their social, emotional, and economic welfare. In this study we investigate any associations between family arrangements, i.e. two parent, single and shared physical custody families and child health outcomes and whether this association was modified by parent-child communication Methods Data on 11-15-year-old children from the 2005/2006 and 2009/2010 Swedish Health Behaviour in School-aged Children survey were analysed using multivariate logistic regression RESULTS: Children in shared physical custody were more likely than children in two-parent families to report multiple health complaints (OR 1.26) and low well-being (OR 1.71). When variables of parent-child communication were entered in the model, the initial differences remained between children living in shared physical custody and those living in two-parent families. Conclusion Children in shared physical custody and single parent families are more at risk of negative outcomes compared to children in two parent families. This association was not modified by parent-child communication in children in shared custody families, indicating that the communication equals that in two-parent family children.

Keywords
HBSC; Health complaints; Parent-child relations; Public health; School-aged children
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-17605 (URN)10.1111/apa.12110 (DOI)000314656600031 ()23190407 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84873404762 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2012-12-06 Created: 2012-12-06 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved
Eriksson, U., Carlsund, Å., Hochwälder, J. & Sellström, E. (2012). Health outcomes among Swedish children: the role of social capital in the family, school, and neighbourhood. Acta Paediatrica, 101(5), 513-517
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Health outcomes among Swedish children: the role of social capital in the family, school, and neighbourhood
2012 (English)In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 101, no 5, p. 513-517Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim: The aim of the study was to explore the extent to which Swedish children's perceptions of social capital in the family, school and neighbourhood predicted health complaints and well-being. Methods: The study used data from the Swedish Health Behaviour in School-agedChildren survey. The sample consisted of 3926 children aged 11-15 years. Correlations and hierarchical multiple linear regression were performed. Results: Higher degrees of family, school and neighbourhood social capital corresponded to lower levels of health complaints and higher levels of well-being. Social capital in these three spheres had a cumulative effect on children's health and well-being. Conclusions: Social capital in the family, school and neighbourhood matters for children's health and well-being and the contributions from each context seem to be additive. Besides the family context, investments for improving child health should primarily be in the school, focusing on social relations and on creating safe and cohesive school environments. Neighbourhood social capital is also of importance and so must be taken into consideration when planning childhealth promotion interventions. © 2011 The Author(s)/Acta Pædiatrica.

Keywords
Adolescence; Health Behaviour in School-aged Children; Health complaints; Health promotion; Well-being
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-14903 (URN)10.1111/j.1651-2227.2011.02579.x (DOI)000302349200031 ()2-s2.0-84859594158 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2011-11-24 Created: 2011-11-24 Last updated: 2017-12-08Bibliographically approved
Sellström, E., O'Campo, P., Muntaner, C., Arnoldsson, G. & Hjern, A. (2011). Hospital admissions of young persons for illicit drug use or abuse: does neighborhood of residence matter?. Health and Place, 17(2), 551-557
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Hospital admissions of young persons for illicit drug use or abuse: does neighborhood of residence matter?
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2011 (English)In: Health and Place, ISSN 1353-8292, E-ISSN 1873-2054, Vol. 17, no 2, p. 551-557Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Adolescence constitutes a period of risk for drug use and drug use disorders.  Previous research, largely focused on individual risk factors, has failed to include neighborhood structure in the study of determinants of youth drug abuse. A cohort of 76,693 adolescents ages 13–15 from 586 urban neighborhoods in Sweden were followed up for 12 years, from age 16 to age 28. Multilevel modeling was used to analyze neighborhood variations in hospital admissions due to illicit drug abuse. We found that illicit drug abuse varied by 8% by neighborhood economic status and the risk of being admitted to hospital increased 73% in  low- compared to high-income neighborhoods. Our results suggest that neighborhood of residence in adolescence plays a significant role in predicting future health-related behaviors and that the need for drug abuse interventions at a neighborhood level is compelling.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2011
Keywords
Neighborhood; Mental health; Multilevel method; Urban; Youth
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-13508 (URN)10.1016/j.healthplace.2010.12.013 (DOI)000289339000018 ()21239211 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-79952533877 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2011-04-11 Created: 2011-04-11 Last updated: 2017-12-11Bibliographically approved
Eriksson, U., Hochwälder, J. & Sellström, E. (2011). Perceptions of community trust and safety: Consequences for children’s well-being in rural and urban contexts. Acta Paediatrica, 100(10), 1373-1378
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Perceptions of community trust and safety: Consequences for children’s well-being in rural and urban contexts
2011 (English)In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 100, no 10, p. 1373-1378Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim:  To explore the associations between subjective well-being and perceptions of community trust and safety amongst children in rural and urban areas.

Methods:  The study used self-reported data from the 2001/2002 Swedish cross-national WHO study Health Behaviour in School-aged Children. The sample consisted of 3852 children aged 11–15 years, living in different residential areas. Bivariate analyses and multivariate logistic regression were performed.

Results:  The results indicated that a greater proportion of children in urban areas perceived low community trust and safety, compared with children in rural areas. Further, the multivariate analysis revealed that perceived community trust and safety significantly impacts upon children’s subjective well-being in both rural and urban contexts.

Conclusion:  Children’s perceptions of trust and safety have different magnitudes in urban and rural areas. The associations of perceptions of community trust and safety for children’s subjective well-being are relevant in both urban and rural areas. As perceptions of low trust and safety in the community seem to be related to low subjective well-being, efforts to encourage community trust and safety should be included amongst the key priorities in community health promotion.

Keywords
Adolescent; HBSC; Health promotion; Social capital
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-13933 (URN)10.1111/j.1651-2227.2011.02346.x (DOI)000294900300031 ()21554386 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-80052822711 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2011-06-08 Created: 2011-06-08 Last updated: 2017-12-11Bibliographically approved
Sellström, E., Bremberg, S. & O'Campo, P. (2011). Yearly incidence of mental disorders in economically inactive young adults. European Journal of Public Health, 21(6), 812-814
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Yearly incidence of mental disorders in economically inactive young adults
2011 (English)In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 21, no 6, p. 812-814Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Increasing rates of mental health problems in youth and an extended period of school-to-work transition is a major concern in Sweden and many other European countries. In this study, being out of the workforce and not in education was associated with severe mental disorders. The risk of being admitted in hospital due to depression was more than doubled in economically inactive young adults. Similarly, the risk of being admitted to hospital due to self-harm and alcohol-related disorder was tripled. Drug abuse was seven times more prevalent among inactive young adults. Processes leading to economic inactivity and to deteriorating mental health are inextricably intertwined. Even if it is not possible to clarify if the association is caused by selection or if it is being outside of labour force that causes mental disorders, it is still urgent to prevent young persons from ending up in long-term economic inactivity.

Keywords
hospital admissions; mental illness; unemployment; youth
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-11932 (URN)10.1093/eurpub/ckq190 (DOI)000297368800026 ()21183471 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-82355181276 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2010-08-24 Created: 2010-08-24 Last updated: 2017-12-12Bibliographically approved
Brännström, L., Sellström, E. & Arnoldsson, G. (2010). Boendesegregation. Konsekvenser för ungdomars framtida levnadsförhållanden. In: Social rapport 2010 (pp. 204-220). Stockholm: Socialstyrelsen
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Boendesegregation. Konsekvenser för ungdomars framtida levnadsförhållanden
2010 (Swedish)In: Social rapport 2010, Stockholm: Socialstyrelsen , 2010, , p. 313p. 204-220Chapter in book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: Socialstyrelsen, 2010. p. 313
Series
Social Rapport ; 2010
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-13427 (URN)978-91-86585-00-6 (ISBN)
Available from: 2011-03-28 Created: 2011-03-28 Last updated: 2011-04-06Bibliographically approved
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