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Alimadadi, M. (2018). Foam-formed Fiber Networks: Manufacturing, Characterization, and Numerical Modeling: With a Note on the Orientation Behavior of Rod-like Particles in Newtonian Fluids. (Doctoral dissertation). Sundsvall: Mid Sweden University
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Foam-formed Fiber Networks: Manufacturing, Characterization, and Numerical Modeling: With a Note on the Orientation Behavior of Rod-like Particles in Newtonian Fluids
2018 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Fiber networks are ubiquitous and are seen in both industrial materials (paper and nonwovens) and biological materials (plant cells and animal tissues). Nature intricately manipulates these network structures by varying their density, aggregation, and fiber orientation to create a variety of functionalities.

In conventional papermaking, fibrous materials are dispersed in water to form a sheet of a highly oriented two-dimensional (2D) network. In such a structure, the in-plane mechanical and transport properties are very different from those in the out-of-plane direction. A three-dimensional (3D) network, however, may offer unique properties not seen in conventional paper products.

Foam, i.e., a dispersed system of gas and liquid, is widely used as the suspending medium in different industries. Recently, foam forming was studied extensively to develop the understanding of foam-fiber interactions in order to find potential applications of this technology in papermaking.

In this thesis, a method for producing low-density, 3D fiber networks by utilizing foam forming is investigated and the structures and mechanical properties of such networks are studied. Micro-computed tomography is used to capture the 3D structure of the network and subsequently to reproduce artificial networks. The finite element method is utilized to model the compression behavior of both the reproduced physical network and the artificial networks in order to understand how the geometry and constitutive elements of the foam-formed network affect its bulk mechanical properties. Additionally, a method was studied in order to quantify the orientation behavior of particles in a laminar Newtonian flow based on the key parameters of the flow which control the orientation.

The resulting foam-formed structures were extremely bulky. Yet despite this high bulk, the fiber networks retained good structural integrity. The compression behavior in the thickness direction was characterized by extreme compressibility and high strain recovery after compression. The results from the modeling showed that the finite-deformation mechanical response of the fiber network in compression was satisfactorily captured by the simulation. However, the artificial network shows higher stiffness than the simulated physical network and the experiment. This discrepancy in stiffness was attributed to macroscopic structural non-uniformities in the physical network, which result in increased local compliance. It was also found that the friction between the fibers, as well as the fiber curvature, had a negligible impact on the compression response of the fiber network, while defects (in the form of kinks) had an effect on the response in the last stages of compression. The study of the orientation behavior of particles at different flow velocities, particle sizes, and channel geometries suggests that it might be possible to utilize the flow shear rate as a means to quantify the orientation behavior.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sundsvall: Mid Sweden University, 2018. p. 46
Series
Mid Sweden University doctoral thesis, ISSN 1652-893X ; 278
Keywords
3D fiber network structure, foam forming, numerical modeling, compression simulation, orientation, wall-bounded flow, CFD, Jeffery orbits, LS-DYNA
National Category
Paper, Pulp and Fiber Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-33219 (URN)978-91-88527-44-8 (ISBN)
Public defence
2018-03-28, O102, Holmgatan 10, Sundsvall, 09:00 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Note

Vid tidpunkten för disputationen var följande delarbeten opublicerade: delarbete 2 inskickat, delarbete 3 och 4 manuskript.

At the time of the doctoral defence the following papers were unpublished: paper 2 submitted, paper 3 and 4 manuscripts.

Available from: 2018-03-12 Created: 2018-03-07 Last updated: 2018-03-12Bibliographically approved
Alimadadi, M., Lindström, S. B. & Kulachenko, A. (2018). Role of microstructures in the compression response of three-dimensional foam-formed wood fiber networks. Soft Matter, 14(44), 8945-8955, Article ID C7SM02561K.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Role of microstructures in the compression response of three-dimensional foam-formed wood fiber networks
2018 (English)In: Soft Matter, ISSN 1744-683X, E-ISSN 1744-6848, Vol. 14, no 44, p. 8945-8955, article id C7SM02561KArticle in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

High-porosity, three-dimensional wood fiber networks made by foam forming present experimentally accessible instances of hierarchically structured, athermal fiber networks. We investigate the large deformation compression behavior of these networks using fiber-resolved finite element analyses to elucidate the role of microstructures in the mechanical response to compression. Three-dimensional network structures are acquired using micro-computed tomography and subsequent skeletonization into a Euclidean graph representation. By using a fitting procedure to the geometrical graph data, we are able to identify nine independent statistical parameters needed for the regeneration of artificial networks with the observed statistics. The compression response of these artificially generated networks and the physical network is then investigated using implicit finite element analysis. A direct comparison of the simulation results from the reconstructed and artificial network reveals remarkable differences already in the elastic region. These can neither be fully explained by density scaling, the size effect nor the boundary conditions. The only factor which provides the consistent explanation of the observed difference is the density and fiber orientation nonuniformities; these contribute to strain-localization so that the network becomes more compliant than expected for statistically uniform microstructures. We also demonstrate that the experimentally manifested strain-stiffening of such networks is due to development of new inter-fiber contacts during compression.

National Category
Paper, Pulp and Fiber Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-34885 (URN)10.1039/C7SM02561K (DOI)000450442300008 ()30398491 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85056540966 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-11-14 Created: 2018-11-14 Last updated: 2018-12-11Bibliographically approved
Alimadadi, M. & Uesaka, T. (2016). 3D-oriented fiber networks made by foam forming. Cellulose (London), 23(1), 661-671
Open this publication in new window or tab >>3D-oriented fiber networks made by foam forming
2016 (English)In: Cellulose (London), ISSN 0969-0239, E-ISSN 1572-882X, ISSN 1572-882X, Vol. 23, no 1, p. 661-671Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In industrial applications, such as paper and nonwovens, cellulose fibers are used in the form of a network where the fibers are oriented more or less in the sheet-plane direction. However, in many biological systems, fibers are instead oriented in a three-dimensional (3D) space, creating a wide variety of functionalities. In this study we created a 3D-oriented fiber network on the laboratory scale and have identified some unique features of its structure and mechanical properties. The 3D fiber network sheets were prepared by using foam-forming as well as modifying consolidation and drying procedures. The fiber orientation and tensile/compression behavior were determined. The resulting sheets were extremely bulky (above 190 cm3/g) and had extremely low stiffness (or high softness) compared to the reference handsheets. Despite this high bulk, the sheets retained good structural integrity. We found that a 3D-oriented fiber network requires much less fiber-fiber contact to create a connected (“percolated”) network than a two-dimensionally oriented network. The compression behavior in the thickness direction was also unique, characterized by extreme compressibility because of its extreme bulk and a long initial increase in the compression load as well as high strain recovery after compression because of its fiber reorientation during compression.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Netherlands, 2016
Keywords
3D fiber network; Foam forming; Percolation; Compression
National Category
Paper, Pulp and Fiber Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-26269 (URN)10.1007/s10570-015-0811-z (DOI)000368802700046 ()2-s2.0-84955739047 (Scopus ID)
Note

Publ online Nov 2015

The final publication is available at Springer via

http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10570-015-0811-z

Available from: 2015-11-18 Created: 2015-11-18 Last updated: 2018-03-12Bibliographically approved
Alimadadi, M. & Uesaka, T. (2014). Exploring One-more Dimension of Paper: Properties of 3D-Orieneted Fiber Network. In: Progress in Paper Physics Proceedings 2014: . Paper presented at Progress in Paper Physics 2014 Seminar, North Carolina, USA, September 8-11, 2014.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Exploring One-more Dimension of Paper: Properties of 3D-Orieneted Fiber Network
2014 (English)In: Progress in Paper Physics Proceedings 2014, 2014Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
National Category
Paper, Pulp and Fiber Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-24234 (URN)
Conference
Progress in Paper Physics 2014 Seminar, North Carolina, USA, September 8-11, 2014
Available from: 2015-01-27 Created: 2015-01-27 Last updated: 2015-04-17Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-3977-1892

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