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Selander, John, professor
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Publications (10 of 32) Show all publications
Tjulin, Å., MacEachen, E., Larsson, R., Bigelow, P., Vinberg, S., Selander, J. & White, D. (2019). An International Online Work Disability Policy Course: How a University Partnership Became a Facilitator. In: : . Paper presented at The Work Disability Prevention and Integration (WDPI) 2019, Odense, Denmark, June 4-7, 2019.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>An International Online Work Disability Policy Course: How a University Partnership Became a Facilitator
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2019 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-37386 (URN)
Conference
The Work Disability Prevention and Integration (WDPI) 2019, Odense, Denmark, June 4-7, 2019
Available from: 2019-09-26 Created: 2019-09-26 Last updated: 2019-09-30Bibliographically approved
Buys, N. J., John, S. & Sun, J. (2019). Employee experience of workplace supervisor contact and support during long-term sickness absence. Disability and Rehabilitation, 41(7), 808-814
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Employee experience of workplace supervisor contact and support during long-term sickness absence
2019 (English)In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 41, no 7, p. 808-814Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: Workplace support is an important factor in promoting successful return to work. The purpose of this article is to examine relationships between supervisor contact, perceived workplace support and demographic variables among employees on long-term sickness absence.

Materials and method: Data were collected from 204 public employees at a municipality in Sweden who had been on long term sickness absence (60 days or more) using a 23 question survey instrument that collected information on demographic variables, supervisor contact and perceived workplace support.

Results: Most injured employees (97%) reported having contact with their supervisors during their sickness absence, with a majority (56%) reporting high levels of support, including early (58.6%) and multiple (70.7%) contacts. Most were pleased with amount of contact (68.9%) and the majority had discussed workplace accommodations (68.1%). Employees who self-initiated contact, felt the amount of contact was appropriate, had a personal meeting with their supervisors and discussed workplace adjustments reported experiencing higher levels of support from supervisors.

Conclusions: Employees on long-term sickness absence appreciate contact from their supervisors and this is associated with perceived workplace support. However, the amount and employee experience of this contact is important. It needs to be perceived by employees as supportive, which includes a focus on strategies (e.g., work adjustment) to facilitate a return to work. Supervisor training is required in this area to support the return to work process.

  • Implications for Rehabilitation
  • Contact and support from workplace supervisors is important to workers on long-term sickness absence.

  • Employees appreciate frequent contact from supervisors during long-terms sickness absence.

  • Employees appreciate a personal meeting with supervisors and the opportunity to discuss issues related to return to work such as work adjustment.

  • Employers should provide training to supervisors on how to communicate and assist employees on long-term sickness absence.

Keywords
Workplace support, return to work, injured workers, workplace communication, workplace accommodations
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-32336 (URN)10.1080/09638288.2017.1410584 (DOI)000461680800008 ()29212387 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-12-08 Created: 2017-12-08 Last updated: 2019-05-20Bibliographically approved
Björk, A., Rönngren, Y., Selander, J., Vinberg, S., Hellzén, O. & Olofsson, N. (2018). Health, lifestyle habits, and physical fitness among adults with ADHD compared with a random sample of a Swedish general population. Society, health and vulnerability, 9(1), Article ID UNSP 1553916.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Health, lifestyle habits, and physical fitness among adults with ADHD compared with a random sample of a Swedish general population
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2018 (English)In: Society, health and vulnerability, E-ISSN 2002-1518, Vol. 9, no 1, article id UNSP 1553916Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Persons with Attention Deficit Hyperactive Disorder (ADHD) represent a high-risk population according to health and lifestyles. In the present study, 48 adults with ADHD were recruited to a forthcoming lifestyle intervention. The ADHD sample was matched to a random sample of 42 persons from a Swedish general population that was selected from LIV (a Lifestyle-Performance-Health project).

Objective: To identify potential differences in health, lifestyle habits, and physical fitness between adults with and without ADHD.

Method: Self-reported questionnaires and physical fitness tests.

Results: The ADHD group show worse health outcomes with higher odds ratios for bad general health (OR;13 CI; (3,4–50)), and poorer lifestyle habits with higher odds ratios for low weekly exercise (OR; 3,8 CI; (1,2–13)). When adjusting for education, employment status, and cash margin, the ADHD sample did not show decreased aerobic fitness (OR; 0,9 CI; (0,8–1,0), but lower odds ratios for doing less sit-ups (OR; 0,6 CI; (0,4–0,9)) compared to the general population group.

Conclusion: It is not possible to prove that the ADHD diagnosis itself cause the worse health and lifestyle. Other lifestyle factors may have negative consequences of adult ADHD, such as lower levels of education, less succeed in working life, and minor financial margins.

Keywords
Adult ADHD, general health, lifestyle habits, mental health, fitness test, Swedish general population
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-35207 (URN)10.1080/20021518.2018.1553916 (DOI)000453874400001 ()
Note

Published online: 18 Dec 2018

Available from: 2018-12-14 Created: 2018-12-14 Last updated: 2019-01-08Bibliographically approved
Wall, E. & John, S. (2018). Return to Work After Long-Term Sick Leave: Stories of Employed Women With Common Mental Disorders. International Journal of Disability Mangement Research, 13(e4), 1-7
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Return to Work After Long-Term Sick Leave: Stories of Employed Women With Common Mental Disorders
2018 (English)In: International Journal of Disability Mangement Research, ISSN 1833-8550, E-ISSN 1834-4887, Vol. 13, no e4, p. 1-7Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of this study is to investigate the perceptions of female employees on long-term sickness absence due to common mental disorders (CMDs), in relation to what they perceive would best help them to return to work. Data were collected through a survey answered by employees at a municipality in Sweden on long-term sick leave. Results of the current study are based on a part of that material, namely from 56 women with CMDs who responded to the final open question. The analysis involves two steps. Initially, we explored themes that form the accounts in the findings. Secondly, based on the themes, collective narratives, storylines were identified. Three different storylines were found to be prominent in the findings. The storylines describe how the participants collectively expressed themselves in relation to the possibilities for return to work, and the following storylines were derived: It feels like too much, Things are moving too fast, and I have to get out of here!. The findings are related to perceived demands, control and support. From a disability management perspective, we have learned the importance of restoring the balance between demands, control and support — not only to prevent absence from work, but also to facilitate return to work after a period of long-term sickness.

Keywords
disability management, return to work, women’s health, common mental disorder
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-35165 (URN)10.1017/idm.2018.6 (DOI)2-s2.0-85057756149 (Scopus ID)
Note

Published online: 03 December 2018

Available from: 2018-12-11 Created: 2018-12-11 Last updated: 2019-03-27Bibliographically approved
Björk, A., Rönngren, Y., Selander, J., Vinberg, S. & Hellzen, O. (2017). Perspectives on Everyday Suffering among People with Adult Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder and Concurrent Mental Disorders. Open Journal of Nursing, 7, 583-598
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Perspectives on Everyday Suffering among People with Adult Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder and Concurrent Mental Disorders
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2017 (English)In: Open Journal of Nursing, ISSN 2162-5336, E-ISSN 2162-5344, Vol. 7, p. 583-598Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of this study was to describe the perceptions of everyday suffering among adults with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and comorbid mental disease. Directed content analysis guided by Eriksson’s theory on human suffering was performed on data from 20 individual interviews. Expressions of both suffering and well-being were identified; the former centred on loneliness and related to life, illness, and care, which supported Eriksson’s theory, whereas expressions of well-being related to ADHD diagnosis and supportive social relationships. Nevertheless, results indicate the need to expand those expressions in order to better contribute to developing a supportive rehabilitation regimen that can provide more interpersonal care.

Keywords
Adult Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, Directed Content Analysis, Suffering, Supportive Rehabilitation
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-30783 (URN)10.4236/ojn.2017.75044 (DOI)
Available from: 2017-05-28 Created: 2017-05-28 Last updated: 2017-05-29Bibliographically approved
Selander, J. (2016). Is Employer-Based Disability Management Necessary in a Social-Democratic Welfare State like Sweden?. International Journal of Disability Mangement Research, 11, Article ID e4.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Is Employer-Based Disability Management Necessary in a Social-Democratic Welfare State like Sweden?
2016 (English)In: International Journal of Disability Mangement Research, ISSN 1833-8550, E-ISSN 1834-4887, Vol. 11, article id e4Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this article the need for employer-based disability management (DM) in a modern welfare state is discussed. The article is not a traditional research article, but rather a conceptual article with a purpose to discuss and reflect over existing perspectives, and argue for a stronger focus on welfare state issues in DM research. Focus is set on Sweden and it is concluded that much of the thought behind DM is indeed built into the comprehensive welfare system. In addition to the employer's responsibilities regarding ill-health prevention, the Acts and regulations of the governmental social insurance agency's responsibilities regarding return to work are comprehensive. As can be seen, however, this is no guarantee that the established process will work in practice. In too many cases, the system in Sweden is suffering from organisational and case-level related problems. Against this background, it is suggested that current responsibilities put on the social insurance agency can be removed and instead be put on the employer. The answer to the main question stated in this article (i.e., ‘Is employer-based DM necessary in a social-democratic welfare state like Sweden?’) is obviously yes.

Keywords
disability management, welfare state
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-29354 (URN)10.1017/idm.2016.3 (DOI)2-s2.0-84994174406 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-11-28 Created: 2016-11-28 Last updated: 2017-07-04Bibliographically approved
Rinaldo, U. & Selander, J. (2016). Return to work after vocational rehabilitation for sick-listed workers with long-term back, neck and shoulder problems: A follow-up study of factors involved. Work: A journal of Prevention, Assesment and rehabilitation, 55(1), 115-131
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Return to work after vocational rehabilitation for sick-listed workers with long-term back, neck and shoulder problems: A follow-up study of factors involved
2016 (English)In: Work: A journal of Prevention, Assesment and rehabilitation, ISSN 1051-9815, E-ISSN 1875-9270, Vol. 55, no 1, p. 115-131Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Absence from work due to musculoskeletal disorders is a significant problem from a number of perspectives, and there is a great need to identify factors that facilitate return to work (RTW). OBJECTIVE: To identify factors related to RTW after vocational rehabilitation for sick-listed workers with long-term back, neck and/or shoulder problems, and to compare the results with those from a previous literature review based on studies from 1980 to 2000. METHODS: A literature review based on studies published 2001-2014 in PubMed, CINAHL, EMBASE, ERIC and the Cochrane Library. RESULTS: Major risk factors for not returning to work are: higher age, factors related to pain such as higher levels of pain and pain related fear, avoidance of activity, high distress and depression. Facilitating factors for RTW are: lower functional disability, gaining control over one's own condition, believing in RTW and work-related factors such as occupational training, and having a job coach or an RTW coordinator. Compared with the results from the previous review, the present review shows less of a focus on sociodemographic factors and more on psychological factors. Both studies highlight risk factors such as older age, higher levels of pain, depression and less internal locus of control. CONCLUSION: Psychosocial and work-related factors are important and should be included in interventions for the RTW of people with long-term back, neck and/or shoulder problems.

Keywords
facilitating factors, Musculoskeletal disorders, re-entry, sick leave, working life
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-29142 (URN)10.3233/WOR-162387 (DOI)000386411100012 ()2-s2.0-84989321408 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-10-27 Created: 2016-10-27 Last updated: 2017-11-29Bibliographically approved
Selander, J., Tjulin, Å., Mussner, U. & Ekberg, K. (2015). Contact With the Workplace During Long-Term Sickness Absence and Worker Expectations of Return to Work. International Journal of Disability Mangement Research, 10, Article ID e3.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Contact With the Workplace During Long-Term Sickness Absence and Worker Expectations of Return to Work
2015 (English)In: International Journal of Disability Mangement Research, ISSN 1833-8550, E-ISSN 1834-4887, Vol. 10, article id e3Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Since long-term sickness absence constitutes a problem in most western countries, research that can facilitate return to work (RTW) is important. Today there is evidence that the social context at the workplace has a significant impact on return to work. The dual aims of the study was firstly to investigate the pattern and quality of contact between employees on long-term sick leave and different actors at the workplace, and secondly to investigate whether contacts with the workplace were associated with expectations regarding return to work. An explorative method and descriptive design was used for the first aim. For the second aim, the data was analysed in a multivariate logistic regression model. The results show that employees had frequent and, in most cases, appreciated contact with their supervisor and co-workers. Contact with other workplace actors; that is, the occupational health unit, the union representative, and the human resources department, were less frequent. Employees who experienced the contact as supportive and constructive were far more positive and optimistic than others regarding return to work. It is concluded that supervisors and co-workers should be aware that they play a significant role in the return-to-work process, and that quality of contact is what matters.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2015
Keywords
co-worker, long-term sickness, return to work, workplace contact
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-26410 (URN)10.1017/idm.2015.3 (DOI)2-s2.0-84949921833 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2015-12-11 Created: 2015-12-11 Last updated: 2019-09-30Bibliographically approved
Tjulin, Å., Mussner, U., Selander, J. & Ekberg, K. (2015). Learning Experiences in Return to Work Among Workplace Actors. International Journal of Disability Mangement Research, 10, Article ID e1.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Learning Experiences in Return to Work Among Workplace Actors
2015 (English)In: International Journal of Disability Mangement Research, ISSN 1833-8550, E-ISSN 1834-4887, Vol. 10, article id e1Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: The objective of this article was to investigate how individual learning emerges among workplace actors during the return-to-work process, and whether the prerequisites for collective learning at the workplace are present and managed by the actors. Learning in this context is viewed as a change in the preconceptions, experience or competence of the individual as a result of interactions in the workplace due to the return-to-work process. Method: A qualitative method was used, consisting of open-ended interviews with 19 individuals across 11 workplaces in the public and private sector. Inductive content analysis was performed. Results: The key findings from this study are that individual learning emerges in the return-to-work process due to previous experience, communication with other workplace actors, or insights into what works for the individual. However, the individual learning that occurs in the return-to-work process is not carried over into workplace learning due to barriers in understanding the needs and opportunities that may be present in the process. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that individual learning occurs within social practices through social interaction between the actors involved (workers on sickness absence supervisors and colleagues) and individual experiences. A greater knowledge of the factors that contribute to workplace learning could facilitate biopsychosocial and ecological return-to-work interventions, which allow workplace actors to draw on previous experiences from one return-to-work process to another.

Keywords
workplace; learning; return to work; Sweden; qualitative
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-26319 (URN)10.1017/idm.2015.1 (DOI)2-s2.0-84939202234 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2015-11-27 Created: 2015-11-27 Last updated: 2017-05-22Bibliographically approved
Nordenmark, M., Gillander Gådin, K., Selander, J., Sjödin, J. & Sellström, E. (2015). Self-rated health among young Europeans not in employment, education or training-with a focus on the conventionally unemployed and the disengaged. Vulnerable Groups & Inclusion, 6, Article ID 25824.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Self-rated health among young Europeans not in employment, education or training-with a focus on the conventionally unemployed and the disengaged
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2015 (English)In: Vulnerable Groups & Inclusion, ISSN 2000-8023, E-ISSN 2000-8023, Vol. 6, article id 25824Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

NEET is an acronym for Not in Employment, Education or Training. For the year 2010, it isestimated that 12.5% of all young people aged 1524 in the OECD countries could be categorised as NEETs. Within this group, various subgroups of NEET are identified. Our study, which was conducted using cross-sectional data collected through the European Social Survey, focuses on the category of people who are assumed to be most marginalised and inactive: ‘‘the disengaged.’’ Participants in the study were men and women aged 1830, originating from 33 European countries. The results show that disengaged NEETs reported poorer health than both young people who were conventionally unemployed and those in employment or studying. It is also shown that ‘‘the disengaged’’ scored worse on other social and welfare variables, for example, trust and social activity. Being disengaged is discussed in relation to the gross domestic products of the different countries.

Keywords
NEET; conventionally unemployed; disengaged; GDP; gender
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-26087 (URN)10.3402/vgi.v6.25824 (DOI)
Available from: 2015-10-16 Created: 2015-10-16 Last updated: 2017-12-01Bibliographically approved
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