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von Zeipel, Hugo
Publications (7 of 7) Show all publications
von Zeipel, H. & Westman, A.-K. (2019). Elevers och lärares fokus i naturvetenskapliga laborationer. Utbildning och Demokrati, 28(3), 57-75
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Elevers och lärares fokus i naturvetenskapliga laborationer
2019 (English)In: Utbildning och Demokrati, ISSN 1102-6472, E-ISSN 2001-7316, Vol. 28, no 3, p. 57-75Article in journal (Refereed) Published
National Category
Didactics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-37932 (URN)
Available from: 2019-12-09 Created: 2019-12-09 Last updated: 2019-12-09Bibliographically approved
Jaldemark, J., Eriksson Bergström, S., von Zeipel, H. & Westman, A.-K. (2019). Wearable technologies as a research tool for studying learning: The application of spy glasses in data collection of children's learning (2ed.). In: Yu Aimee Zhang, Dean Cristol (Ed.), Handbook of mobile teaching and learning: . Springer
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Wearable technologies as a research tool for studying learning: The application of spy glasses in data collection of children's learning
2019 (English)In: Handbook of mobile teaching and learning / [ed] Yu Aimee Zhang, Dean Cristol, Springer, 2019, 2Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This chapter discusses the potential that wearable technologies have for studying and understanding how people learn. In particular, the focus is on how spy glasses can be used as a tool for collecting data from educational situations. The chapter report from two different cases performed by the authors in which spy glasses were used, including considerations made from a methodological point of view. From the first case a conclusion is that spy-glass recording made it possible to closely follow teaching and learning during science labwork and find specific elements not found in video data from ordinary video cameras. The second case reports on valuable information about how the motivation for learning works in young children. Drawing further from these studies, the study elaborate on themes that arise as central to video research: ethics, technology and methodology as well as selection and analysis. The chapter discusses a transformation in how childhood is considered in relation to new technology. Here children are seen as more active and participatory in the shaping of their own childhoods. This can also result in developing new research methods in order to understand and visualise the child’s perspective, and using wearable technologies could certainly be one of these areas. In other words, it is a unique perspective when participants are co-creators of research studies. This implies important future work ahead, developing and applying wearable technologies for education and educational research.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2019 Edition: 2
Keywords
excursion, labwork, mobile learning, participant’s perspective, point-of-view video glasses, spy glasses, wearable devices, wearable technologies
National Category
Pedagogy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-35015 (URN)9789811327650 (ISBN)
Available from: 2019-03-26 Created: 2019-03-26 Last updated: 2019-06-19Bibliographically approved
von Zeipel, H. & Westman, A.-K. (2018). The Science labwork situation and opportunities for learning – Teacher and student perspectives. In: : . Paper presented at XVIII IOSTE Symposium, Malmö, Sweden 13-17 Aug, 2018.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Science labwork situation and opportunities for learning – Teacher and student perspectives
2018 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Labwork in science education has been questioned with respect to its contribution to learning. This paper reports on critical factors to enhance students’ meaning making during labwork in six different Swedish schools. Using Spy-glass cameras we were able to collect close-up video data from student talk and activities. Student focus varied between schools and student groups, on most occasion a majority of time was spent focusing clearly outside anything related to the subject. Teachers’ introductions were categorized according to their main focus (scientific ideas, laboratory skills or knowledge of scientific inquiries) and school-related students’ negotiations were analyzed using the same categories. There was no clear-cut relationship between the focus of teacher introductions and the nature of the school-related student negotiations. Overall, teacher introductions most often focused on the scientific ideas. However, student negotiations were dominated by the laboratory skills category, followed by scientific ideas. Negotiations concerning knowledge of scientific inquiry were rare. Small variations among groups suggests that students had similar experiences of what was expected from them in the labwork situation. We found a connection between whether the scientific ideas had been previously processed and the likelihood that students discussions would focus on the scientific ideas. There was a range in the type of tasks given to the students in connection with the labwork. We found that both open discussions about scientific topics as well as limited activities such as simply filling in a form could potentially generate scientific discussions. However, the combination of previously unprocessed scientific content and openly formulated tasks was never successful. We conclude that several factors affect student focus and that the labwork situation remains questionable as learning situations as long as all these factors are not entirely appreciated by teachers.

National Category
Didactics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-37873 (URN)
Conference
XVIII IOSTE Symposium, Malmö, Sweden 13-17 Aug, 2018
Available from: 2019-12-04 Created: 2019-12-04 Last updated: 2019-12-04Bibliographically approved
von Zeipel, H. (2015). Illustrations in Science Education: An Investigation of Young Pupils Using Explanatory Pictures of Electrical Currents. In: XVI INTERNATIONAL ORGANISATION FOR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION SYMPOSIUM (IOSTE BORNEO 2014): . Paper presented at 16th Symposium of the International-Organisation-for-Science-and-Technology-Education (IOSTE), SEP 21-27, 2014, Kuching, MALAYSIA (pp. 204-210).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Illustrations in Science Education: An Investigation of Young Pupils Using Explanatory Pictures of Electrical Currents
2015 (English)In: XVI INTERNATIONAL ORGANISATION FOR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION SYMPOSIUM (IOSTE BORNEO 2014), 2015, p. 204-210Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This study is part of a project regarding explanatory illustrations in science education. Research questions here concern how pupils use and make meaning from illustrations in a science textbook. Electricity was chosen as the subject. Video data was collected in 8 sessions, each with a pair of pupils, 10-11 years of age in one school in Sweden. Communication within the pairs and with the interviewer was analyzed. The children also drew a picture of a battery and explained its function using this drawing. The most striking result was an almost complete lack of transparency for the scientific information in the illustrations. Regardless of previous knowledge, pupils were almost never able to collect new information on their own or together with their peer. As long as the visual information matched previous knowledge they could explain the content, but as the complexity increased, they were lost. They then either expressed their incomprehension or carried on to argue for evident misconceptions, not realizing that the illustrations were contradicting them. Together with the interviewer, pupils could eventually identify central scientific messages and where their previous understanding was challenged. One conclusion is that scientific illustrations can drive scientific in-depth discussion. However, the main conclusion is that pupils are not trained to interpret multimodal information themselves and that teachers and textbook authors therefore risk overestimating pupils de-coding abilities. (C) 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

Series
Procedia Social and Behavioral Sciences, ISSN 1877-0428 ; 167
Keywords
visual information, explanatory illustrations, science education, electricity, primary school
National Category
Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-26546 (URN)10.1016/j.sbspro.2014.12.663 (DOI)000361493500029 ()
Conference
16th Symposium of the International-Organisation-for-Science-and-Technology-Education (IOSTE), SEP 21-27, 2014, Kuching, MALAYSIA
Available from: 2015-12-16 Created: 2015-12-16 Last updated: 2016-12-16Bibliographically approved
Moles, A. T., Peco, B., Wallis, I. R., Foley, W. J., Poore, A. G., Seabloom, E. W., . . . Hui, F. K. (2013). Correlations between physical and chemical defences in plants: Tradeoffs, syndromes, or just many different ways to skin a herbivorous cat?. New Phytologist, 198(1), 252-263
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Correlations between physical and chemical defences in plants: Tradeoffs, syndromes, or just many different ways to skin a herbivorous cat?
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2013 (English)In: New Phytologist, ISSN 0028-646X, E-ISSN 1469-8137, Vol. 198, no 1, p. 252-263Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Most plant species have a range of traits that deter herbivores. However, understanding of how different defences are related to one another is surprisingly weak. Many authors argue that defence traits trade off against one another, while others argue that they form coordinated defence syndromes. We collected a dataset of unprecedented taxonomic and geographic scope (261 species spanning 80 families, from 75 sites across the globe) to investigate relationships among four chemical and six physical defences. Five of the 45 pairwise correlations between defence traits were significant and three of these were tradeoffs. The relationship between species' overall chemical and physical defence levels was marginally nonsignificant (P = 0.08), and remained nonsignificant after accounting for phylogeny, growth form and abundance. Neither categorical principal component analysis (PCA) nor hierarchical cluster analysis supported the idea that species displayed defence syndromes. Our results do not support arguments for tradeoffs or for coordinated defence syndromes. Rather, plants display a range of combinations of defence traits. We suggest this lack of consistent defence syndromes may be adaptive, resulting from selective pressure to deploy a different combination of defences to coexisting species.

Keywords
Cyanogenesis, Extrafloral nectaries, Hair, Leaf toughness, Lipid, Plant-herbivore interactions, Spines, Tannin
National Category
Botany
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-18640 (URN)10.1111/nph.12116 (DOI)000315440400026 ()2-s2.0-84874195500 (Scopus ID)
Note

CODEN: NEPHA

Available from: 2013-03-28 Created: 2013-03-27 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
Moles, A. T., Wallis, I. R., Foley, W. J., Warton, D. I., Stegen, J. C., Bisigato, A. J., . . . Prior, L. D. (2011). Putting plant resistance traits on the map: A test of the idea that plants are better defended at lower latitudes. New Phytologist, 191(3), 777-788
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Putting plant resistance traits on the map: A test of the idea that plants are better defended at lower latitudes
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2011 (English)In: New Phytologist, ISSN 0028-646X, E-ISSN 1469-8137, Vol. 191, no 3, p. 777-788Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

It has long been believed that plant species from the tropics have higher levels of traits associated with resistance to herbivores than do species from higher latitudes. A meta-analysis recently showed that the published literature does not support this theory. However, the idea has never been tested using data gathered with consistent methods from a wide range of latitudes. • We quantified the relationship between latitude and a broad range of chemical and physical traits across 301 species from 75 sites world-wide. • Six putative resistance traits, including tannins, the concentration of lipids (an indicator of oils, waxes and resins), and leaf toughness were greater in high-latitude species. Six traits, including cyanide production and the presence of spines, were unrelated to latitude. Only ash content (an indicator of inorganic substances such as calcium oxalates and phytoliths) and the properties of species with delayed greening were higher in the tropics. • Our results do not support the hypothesis that tropical plants have higher levels of resistance traits than do plants from higher latitudes. If anything, plants have higher resistance toward the poles. The greater resistance traits of high-latitude species might be explained by the greater cost of losing a given amount of leaf tissue in low-productivity environments. © 2011 New Phytologist Trust.

Keywords
Global patterns, Latitude, Leaf size, Leaf toughness, Lipid, Plant traits, Plant-animal interactions, Tannin
National Category
Biological Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-14208 (URN)10.1111/j.1469-8137.2011.03732.x (DOI)000292924600016 ()2-s2.0-79960538282 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2011-07-19 Created: 2011-07-19 Last updated: 2017-12-08Bibliographically approved
von Zeipel, H. & Eriksson, O. (2007). Fruit removal in the forest herb Actaea spicata depends on local context of fruits sharing the same dispersers. International journal of plant sciences, 168(6), 855-860
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Fruit removal in the forest herb Actaea spicata depends on local context of fruits sharing the same dispersers
2007 (English)In: International journal of plant sciences, ISSN 1058-5893, E-ISSN 1537-5315, Vol. 168, no 6, p. 855-860Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Heterospecific effects from neighboring plants on fruit removal are rarely examined. In this study we recorded removal of fruits of four species from experimental plots. The main study species, the forest herb Actaea spicata, has berries attractive to rodents. We tested for effects from a larger-scale context (plant abundance) and a smaller scale (number of fruits aggregated including several species with fleshy as well as dry fruits). Fruit removal varied among sites. Fleshy-fruited species removal was correlated within sites. Fruit removal was higher within than outside Actaea populations but was unrelated to plant abundances among existing populations. The small-scale context treatment yielded clear results. Removal of Actaea fruits was higher from large aggregations of fruits, and it was the number of fruits rather than species identity that affected removal. Presence of both fleshy and dry fruits increased removal. This study provides experimental evidence of heterospecific effects on fruit removal, and we conclude that the species included in the study attract the same dispersers and that the small-scale biotic context is important. We suggest the existence of dispersal hot spots related to the fruit presence overlaid by an unexplained variation among sites.

Keywords
Biotic context, Dispersal, Facilitation, Fruit crop hypothesis, Plant abundance, Rodents
National Category
Biological Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-11640 (URN)10.1086/518255 (DOI)000248303100006 ()2-s2.0-34547129824 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2010-06-10 Created: 2010-06-10 Last updated: 2017-12-12Bibliographically approved
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