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Eriksson Bergström, SofiaORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-5392-7198
Publications (10 of 14) Show all publications
Mozelius, P., Jaldemark, J., Eriksson Bergström, S. & Sundgren, M. (2019). Augmented Education: Location-Based Games for Real-World Teaching and Learning Sessions. In: Vladimir Geroimenko (Ed.), Augmented Reality Games I: (pp. 217-235). Springer
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Augmented Education: Location-Based Games for Real-World Teaching and Learning Sessions
2019 (English)In: Augmented Reality Games I / [ed] Vladimir Geroimenko, Springer, 2019, p. 217-235Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

GPS-equipped smartphones have enabled the construction of location-based games. In augmented reality (AR), fantasy worlds are mapped to real-world settings. Two location-based AR games that use historical markers as points of interest are Ingress and Pokémon GO. This chapter describes and discusses how PokéStop statues in Pokémon GO can be used in primary school outdoor sessions. A case study was conducted on how fifth-grade students learned about local history, social sciences and humanities during game sessions. Findings suggest that AR could be an inspiring  extension in educational settings, if activities are aligned to the surroundings and learning objectives and outdoor gaming activities are followed up in more traditional classroom sessions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2019
Series
Augmented Reality Games ; 1
Keywords
augmented reality, location-based games, Pokémon GO, outdoor learning
National Category
Didactics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-36148 (URN)10.1007/978-3-030-15616-9_14 (DOI)978-3-030-15615-2 (ISBN)
Available from: 2019-05-15 Created: 2019-05-15 Last updated: 2019-06-03Bibliographically approved
Jaldemark, J., Eriksson Bergström, S. & Mozelius, P. (2019). Orchestrating learning as an emergent practice in the use of location-based games with mobile devices. In: Teresa Cerratto Pargman and Isa Jahnke (Ed.), Emergent practices and material conditions in learning and teaching with technologies: (pp. 163-180). Cham, Switzerland: Springer
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Orchestrating learning as an emergent practice in the use of location-based games with mobile devices
2019 (English)In: Emergent practices and material conditions in learning and teaching with technologies / [ed] Teresa Cerratto Pargman and Isa Jahnke, Cham, Switzerland: Springer, 2019, p. 163-180Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This study discusses the inclusion of location-based games and mobile devices in an educational setting that embraces both indoor and outdoor sessions. The study was built on a framework including learning as a social and collaborative phenomenon. Two case units, in terms of a 5th grade Social Science class and a 6th grade Mathematics class, were included in the study. Each case unit embraced an indoor preparing session, an outdoor session including mobile devices and the location-based game Pokémon GO, and an indoor follow-up session. The chapter aims at contributing to the understanding of how students and teachers together, in an emergent practice of orchestrating learning, apply mobile devices and location-based games in their educational setting. From this aim, the following research question unfolds: How could location-based games and mobile devices be applied by students and teachers to orchestrate learning in middle school settings? Data were gathered by semi-structured group interviews and video recordings with 20 students and two teachers. Moreover, documents such as lesson plans were included in the dataset. In the study, it was found that students and teachers participated in a shared and emerging practice of orchestrating learning and teaching. In this practice students and teachers acted as co-designers to orchestrate the application of location-based games and mobile devices in the educational setting. Findings suggest that an orchestration including a combination of a collaborative approach to learning, location-based games and activities that embrace outdoor and indoor sessions has the potential to vitalise and enhance traditional classroom-based education. However, there is not a guarantee that all students will concentrate on the given task, and just as in an ordinary classroom setting, teaching and learning also require careful orchestration. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cham, Switzerland: Springer, 2019
Keywords
Childhood, Game-based learning, Learning, Location-based games, Middle school, Mobile devices, Mobile learning, Orchestration, Outdoor education, Smartphones
National Category
Pedagogy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-35019 (URN)10.1007/978-3-030-10764-2_10 (DOI)978-3-030-10763-5 (ISBN)978-3-030-10764-2 (ISBN)
Available from: 2019-03-26 Created: 2019-03-26 Last updated: 2019-04-04Bibliographically approved
Jaldemark, J., Eriksson Bergström, S., von Zeipel, H. & Westman, A.-K. (2019). Wearable technologies as a research tool for studying learning: The application of spy glasses in data collection of children's learning (2ed.). In: Yu Aimee Zhang, Dean Cristol (Ed.), Handbook of mobile teaching and learning: . Springer
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Wearable technologies as a research tool for studying learning: The application of spy glasses in data collection of children's learning
2019 (English)In: Handbook of mobile teaching and learning / [ed] Yu Aimee Zhang, Dean Cristol, Springer, 2019, 2Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This chapter discusses the potential that wearable technologies have for studying and understanding how people learn. In particular, the focus is on how spy glasses can be used as a tool for collecting data from educational situations. The chapter report from two different cases performed by the authors in which spy glasses were used, including considerations made from a methodological point of view. From the first case a conclusion is that spy-glass recording made it possible to closely follow teaching and learning during science labwork and find specific elements not found in video data from ordinary video cameras. The second case reports on valuable information about how the motivation for learning works in young children. Drawing further from these studies, the study elaborate on themes that arise as central to video research: ethics, technology and methodology as well as selection and analysis. The chapter discusses a transformation in how childhood is considered in relation to new technology. Here children are seen as more active and participatory in the shaping of their own childhoods. This can also result in developing new research methods in order to understand and visualise the child’s perspective, and using wearable technologies could certainly be one of these areas. In other words, it is a unique perspective when participants are co-creators of research studies. This implies important future work ahead, developing and applying wearable technologies for education and educational research.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2019 Edition: 2
Keywords
excursion, labwork, mobile learning, participant’s perspective, point-of-view video glasses, spy glasses, wearable devices, wearable technologies
National Category
Pedagogy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-35015 (URN)9789811327650 (ISBN)
Available from: 2019-03-26 Created: 2019-03-26 Last updated: 2019-06-19Bibliographically approved
Mozelius, P., Eriksson Bergström, S. & Jaldemark, J. (2018). Location-based games as a key to unlock the classroom. In: Proceedings of the the 12th European Conference on Games Based Learning, ECGBL 2018: . Paper presented at 12th European Conference on Games Based Learning, ECGBL 2018. Sophia Antipolis, France, 12
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Location-based games as a key to unlock the classroom
2018 (English)In: Proceedings of the the 12th European Conference on Games Based Learning, ECGBL 2018, Sophia Antipolis, France, 2018, Vol. 12Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Around a century ago John Dewey (2015) questioned the idea of schooling with a mandatory focus on classroom based studies only. Today, after a century of rapid technological development and vivid didactic discussions the classroom focus still remains. New portable, interconnected and omnipresent 21st century technology opens up possibilities for a spatial independent ubiquitous learning in the spirit of Dewey (Cope & Kalantzis, 2010). This study had the aim to explore and discuss the potential of using location-based games as a catalyst for outdoor activities in formal education. In what ways might a location-based and augmented reality unlock the constraint of traditional classrooms?

 

The overall research strategy has been the case study approach where data has been gathered by spy glasses, hand-held video cameras and group interviews. Two outdoor teaching and learning activities were the two main case units. In the walking sessions K12 students played Pokémon Go to learn about local history and mathematics. Around 1 TB of video clips have been thematically analysed with the use of the computer-assisted qualitative data analysis software tool NVivo. Patterns and themes found in the video analysis have been compared to themes in the answers from the group interviews.

 

Analysis themes related to location-based gaming were Discussions, Outdoor activities and Gaming and gender. Findings indicate that the use of a location-based game can be motivating and a way to unchain students’ sit-down 'enchairment'. However, game-based outdoor activities seem to have more reliable learning outcomes if they are combined with follow-up activities in the classroom. Physically active students also tend to have more active discussions than sitting students in a classroom. Finally, boys and girls seem to have different collaboration patterns during the gaming sessions.                                                                                                                        

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sophia Antipolis, France: , 2018
Keywords
Location-based games, Outdoor activities, Game-based learning, Mobile learning, Enchairment
National Category
Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-34644 (URN)978-1-911218-99-9 (ISBN)
Conference
12th European Conference on Games Based Learning, ECGBL 2018
Available from: 2018-10-06 Created: 2018-10-06 Last updated: 2018-12-12Bibliographically approved
Jaldemark, J., Eriksson Bergström, S. & Mozelius, P. (2017). Applying mobile devices and game-based learning in formal educational settings: Playing Pokémon Go as a tool for learning in a Swedish elementary school. In: Ola Lindberg, Anders D: Olofsson (Ed.), Recent Trends in the Digitalization of the Nordic K-12 Schools: . Paper presented at Recent Trends in the Digitalization of the Nordic K-12 Schools, Umeå, 11-13 October 2017 (pp. 1-4). Umeå
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Applying mobile devices and game-based learning in formal educational settings: Playing Pokémon Go as a tool for learning in a Swedish elementary school
2017 (English)In: Recent Trends in the Digitalization of the Nordic K-12 Schools / [ed] Ola Lindberg, Anders D: Olofsson, Umeå, 2017, p. 1-4Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Umeå: , 2017
Keywords
childhood studies, elementary school, gamebased learning, locationbased games, mobile learning, Pokemon GO, technology-enhanced learning
National Category
Pedagogy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-32682 (URN)
Conference
Recent Trends in the Digitalization of the Nordic K-12 Schools, Umeå, 11-13 October 2017
Available from: 2018-01-15 Created: 2018-01-15 Last updated: 2018-01-16Bibliographically approved
Mozelius, P., Eriksson Bergström, S. & Jaldemark, J. (2017). Learning by Walking - Pokémon Go and Mobile Technology in Formal Education. In: L. Gómez Chova, A. López Martínez and I. Candel Torres (Ed.), ICERI2017 Proceedings: . Paper presented at 10th International Conference of Education, Research and Innovation, Seville, Spain, NOV 16-18, 2017 (pp. 1172-1179). Valencia, Spain: The International Academy of Technology, Education and Development, 10
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Learning by Walking - Pokémon Go and Mobile Technology in Formal Education
2017 (English)In: ICERI2017 Proceedings / [ed] L. Gómez Chova, A. López Martínez and I. Candel Torres, Valencia, Spain: The International Academy of Technology, Education and Development, 2017, Vol. 10, p. 1172-1179Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Peripatetic group learning has a long history that dates back to the walking sessions that Plato and Aristotle led in the Lyceum of Athens. Other teachers in ancient Greece also frequently used play and physical training didactically. Pokémon Go has a relatively short history (starting in the summer of 2016), but this location-based game had a faster global spread than anyone could have imagined. In the first week after its release, the game became the most downloaded app in history. In Pokémon Go, the players use real-world maps on which buildings, roads and water are correctly indicated. The game is played on mobile devices; the Pokémon figures pop up on maps and can be captured with virtual balls. To catch the Pokémon figures, players must physically move to the place where the figure is located; thus, unlike most other digital games, Pokémon Go involves outdoor activities such as long walks.

With its high degree of physical activity, Pokémon Go has attracted researchers’ attention for use as an exergame. Several researchers are also looking at Pokémon Go’s use as an augmented-reality game. In this study, the focus is on Pokémon Go’s use as a mobile-learning game and on the potential for outdoor activities in formal education. In this study, two primary school classes used the game for learning sessions in mathematics and social science. The aim of this study is to discuss students’ expressions regarding how a location-based game such as Pokémon Go could be used as a tool for outdoor activities in formal education.

Each primary school class was divided into groups of three to four students each for planned lessons that included walks. Each group had one or two smartphones to stimulate collaboration between students. The walks included PokéStops where teachers conducted planned sessions; later, the teachers followed up on the outdoor lessons within a traditional classroom setting. Data were gathered from group interviews with the students who participated in the outdoor sessions involving Pokémon Go. The collected data were then analysed and categorised via a thematic analysis.

The findings show that Pokémon Go can be seen as a learning-stimulating game that could augment traditional teaching sessions in formal education. Students reported that they enjoyed catching the Pokémon figures the most, but some students also mentioned that they appreciated the math assignments and liked learning about the statues that they passed during the walkings. The most positive findings were that there were concrete learning outcomes and that this mobile, game-based educational setting seemed to encourage students to engage in collaborative learning. However, Pokémon Go is not an all-encompassing solution for the ongoing digitalisation of primary school. The conclusion is rather that location-based games have the potential to vitalise formal education, provided that they are carefully integrated into the curriculum.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Valencia, Spain: The International Academy of Technology, Education and Development, 2017
Series
ICERI Proceedings, ISSN 2340-1095 ; 10
Keywords
Game-based learning, location-based games, mobile learning, outdoor learning, peripatetic group learning, Pokémon Go
National Category
Didactics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-32104 (URN)10.21125/iceri.2017.0394 (DOI)000429975301044 ()978-84-697-6957-7 (ISBN)
Conference
10th International Conference of Education, Research and Innovation, Seville, Spain, NOV 16-18, 2017
Available from: 2017-11-20 Created: 2017-11-20 Last updated: 2018-05-30Bibliographically approved
Eriksson Bergström, S. (2017). Rum, barn och pedagoger: Om möjligheter och begränsningar för lek, kreativitet och förhandlingar. (1ed.). Stockholm: Liber
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Rum, barn och pedagoger: Om möjligheter och begränsningar för lek, kreativitet och förhandlingar.
2017 (Swedish)Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: Liber, 2017. p. 160 Edition: 1
Keywords
Förskola, lärandemiljö, kreativitet, lek
National Category
Pedagogy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-31791 (URN)978-91-47-11218-0 (ISBN)
Available from: 2017-10-06 Created: 2017-10-06 Last updated: 2017-10-06Bibliographically approved
Eriksson Bergström, S. & Jaldemark, J. (2017). Students’ expressions of learning on the move: Game-based learning and mobile devices in formal outdoor educational settings. In: Fernando Loizides, George Papadopoulos, Nicos Souleles (Ed.), ACM International Conference Proceeding Series: . Paper presented at 16th World Conference on Mobile and Contextual Learning mLearn 2017, Larnaca, Cyprus, 30 October-1 November 2017 (pp. 1-3). Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), Article ID a14.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Students’ expressions of learning on the move: Game-based learning and mobile devices in formal outdoor educational settings
2017 (English)In: ACM International Conference Proceeding Series / [ed] Fernando Loizides, George Papadopoulos, Nicos Souleles, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2017, p. 1-3, article id a14Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The study reported here is part of a project that draws on research from mobile learning, game-based learning and the state-of-the-art view of childhood. These three strands of the wider field of learning meet in this short paper’s intersection of students’ expressions of mobile game-based learning in formal outdoor educational settings. It built on a mobile game-based learning approach that applied a commercial off-the-shelf game included in two teachers’ planning of lessons in mathematics and social science. The study included students’ expressions of learning while playing the game Pokémon Go during an excursion. The students carried spy glasses during the recording of data implying that they were co-producers in the data-collection. The expressions were collected through five focus group interviews, each involving 3-4 students. This data helped to answer the research question: What expressions of applying mobile gamebased learning in formal outdoor educational settings have students aged 11-12 years? The preliminary analysis resulted in categories based on the students’ expressions of various aspects related to the game Pokémon Go, the excursion lesson, using the smartphone, and how they consider learning and teaching at the school. From the preliminary results, the conclusion was that students found the lessons they participated in intriguing. The design of the lessons allowed them to have an open discussion about how learning occurs and to explore different crossdisciplinary themes that they otherwise not might have been able to explore. This conclusion is in line with results from state-of-the-art research within childhood studies. Therefore, the results from the current study suggest that mobile game-based learning in formal outdoor educational settings invited students to be coproducers of the content they were supposed to learn.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2017
Keywords
Childhood studies, commercial off-the-shelf, excursions, gamebased learning, mobile learning, Pokémon GO, spy glasses
National Category
Pedagogy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-32681 (URN)10.1145/3136907.3136921 (DOI)2-s2.0-85041443773 (Scopus ID)978-1-4503-5255-0 (ISBN)
Conference
16th World Conference on Mobile and Contextual Learning mLearn 2017, Larnaca, Cyprus, 30 October-1 November 2017
Available from: 2018-01-15 Created: 2018-01-15 Last updated: 2018-02-21Bibliographically approved
Eriksson Bergström, S. (2013). Rum, barn och pedagoger: Möjligheter och begränsningar i förskolans fysiska miljö. (Doctoral dissertation). Umeå universitet: Print & Media
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Rum, barn och pedagoger: Möjligheter och begränsningar i förskolans fysiska miljö
2013 (Swedish)Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

In this thesis the relationship between the physical environment of preschool, children and preschool teachers is studied. Children participate in preschool from an early age and thus are expected to find themselves within an institutional framework (Eilard & Tallberg Broman, 2011) early in life. Today preschool as an institution can be seen as a place where childhood to a great extent is spent and created (Halldén, 2007e). The physical environment of preschool can consequently be regarded as a structure within which childhood is institutionalized (Kampmann, 2004). In general the thesis deals with how children are shaped by and shape the physical environment that they spend so much time in during early childhood. The purpose is clarified in the following questions: How does the physical environment of preschool structure and organise the activities of chil-dren? What activities are created in relation to the possibilities and limitations of the physical environment? In what way can the relationship between the invitations of the physical environment, the child’s scope for action, and preschool teachers be seen? To understand the empirical material in the thesis the concept of affordance (J.J.Gibson, 1986) and the activity theory (Leontiev, 1986; Engeström, 1987) has been used. The empirical evidence in the thesis is based on both video observations and interviews. The study was designed as a multiple case study (Stake, 1995), and three preschool classes each formed a case. The study was inspired by ethnography. The significance of seeing the environment as a set of affordances (J.J.Gibson, 1986) is that it, to a greater degree, can lead to children being allowed to discover the invitations to action there are and as a result freedom to act and negotiations can be created in both inside and outside environments. Through this way of thinking a free zone is created in an institutionalised childhood where children through their agency handle and redesign that which was intended to regulate and give structure. As a counterbalance to the institutionalisation of childhood this study contribute to an understanding of children’s individual and collective activities as a free zone in an otherwise controlled and regulated milieu. The contribution of this thesis consists of the study of the physical environment and the importance of the material in forming the child.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Umeå universitet: Print & Media, 2013
Series
Akademiska avhandlingar vid Pedagogiska institutionen, Umeå universitet, ISSN 0281-6768 ; 104
National Category
Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-26774 (URN)978-91-7459-572-7 (ISBN)
Supervisors
Available from: 2016-01-05 Created: 2015-12-30 Last updated: 2016-01-05Bibliographically approved
Eriksson Bergström, S. (2008). Agency, affordances and artefacts: Towards a theoretical perspective in preschool?.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Agency, affordances and artefacts: Towards a theoretical perspective in preschool?
2008 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Other academic)
National Category
Pedagogy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-8185 (URN)
Available from: 2009-01-22 Created: 2009-01-12 Last updated: 2009-11-06Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-5392-7198

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