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Douglas, Kevin S.
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Publications (10 of 34) Show all publications
Gatner, D. T., Douglas, K. S. & Hart, S. D. (2018). Comparing the lexical similarity of the triarchic model of psychopathy to contemporary models of psychopathy. Journal of personality, 86(4), 577-589
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Comparing the lexical similarity of the triarchic model of psychopathy to contemporary models of psychopathy
2018 (English)In: Journal of personality, ISSN 0022-3506, E-ISSN 1467-6494, Vol. 86, no 4, p. 577-589Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: The triarchic model of psychopathy (Patrick, Fowles, & Krueger, 2009) posits that psychopathic personality comprises three domains: boldness, meanness, and disinhibition. The present study aimed to clarify conceptual overlap between contemporary definitions of psychopathy, with particular emphasis given to the relevance of boldness (i.e., social dominance, venturesomeness, emotional resiliency)-a topic of recent debate. Method: Undergraduate students (N=439) compared the lexical similarity of triarchic domains with two contemporary models of psychopathy: the Comprehensive Assessment of Psychopathic Personality (CAPP; Cooke, Hart, Logan, & Michie, 2012) and the Five-Factor Model of psychopathy (FFM; Widiger & Lynam, 1998). Results: From a content validity perspective, meanness and disinhibition were lexically similar to both the CAPP and FFM psychopathy, whereas boldness was less strongly associated with these models. Meanness showed the strongest lexical similarity in comparison with past prototypicality ratings of the CAPP and FFM psychopathy. Conclusions: These findings bear implications for defining and comparing conceptualizations of psychopathy that underpin its assessment. 

Keywords
Boldness, CAPP, FFM psychopathy, Psychopathy, Triarchic psychopathy
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-32233 (URN)10.1111/jopy.12337 (DOI)000439550000001 ()
Note

Version of record online: 11 September 2017

Available from: 2017-12-04 Created: 2017-12-04 Last updated: 2018-08-17Bibliographically approved
Shaffer, C. S., Gulbransen, E. M. D., Viljoen, J. L., Roesch, R. & Douglas, K. S. (2018). Predictive Validity of the MAYSI-2 and PAI-A for Suicide-Related Behavior and Nonsuicidal Self-Injury Among Adjudicated Adolescent Offenders on Probation. Criminal justice and behavior, 45(9), 1383-1403
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Predictive Validity of the MAYSI-2 and PAI-A for Suicide-Related Behavior and Nonsuicidal Self-Injury Among Adjudicated Adolescent Offenders on Probation
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2018 (English)In: Criminal justice and behavior, ISSN 0093-8548, E-ISSN 1552-3594, Vol. 45, no 9, p. 1383-1403Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This prospective study evaluated the ability of the MAYSI-2 and PAI-A to predict suicide-related behavior (SRB) and nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) among adjudicated adolescent offenders on probation. Predictive validity of the MAYSI-2 for SRB and NSSI has generally been postdictively examined among detained adolescents. In addition, no published studies have examined the predictive validity of the PAI-A for SRB and NSSI among adolescent offenders. Neither the MAYSI-2 nor PAI-A added incremental predictive validity above lifetime SRB or NSSI. However, several MAYSI-2 and PAI-A subscales were predictive of SRB or NSSI. With some exceptions, most recommended instrument cut-off scores differentiated between low-risk and high-risk youth. These findings suggest that the MAYSI-2 and PAI-A hold promise for evaluating SRB and NSSI among justice-involved youth. In addition, these findings contribute to more informed decisions regarding the use of these tools and can be used to inform SRB and NSSI prevention efforts.

Keywords
adolescent offenders, MAYSI-2, nonsuicidal self-injury, PAI-A, suicide-related behavior
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-34514 (URN)10.1177/0093854818784988 (DOI)000441716700005 ()2-s2.0-85049864970 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-09-26 Created: 2018-09-26 Last updated: 2018-09-28Bibliographically approved
Shaffer, C. S., Adjei, J., Viljoen, J. L., Douglas, K. S. & Saewyc, E. M. (2018). Ten-Year Trends in Physical Dating Violence Victimization Among Adolescent Boys and Girls in British Columbia, Canada. Journal of Interpersonal Violence
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Ten-Year Trends in Physical Dating Violence Victimization Among Adolescent Boys and Girls in British Columbia, Canada
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2018 (English)In: Journal of Interpersonal Violence, ISSN 0886-2605, E-ISSN 1552-6518Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Physical dating violence (PDV) victimization among adolescents is a serious global problem. Although knowledge of trends in PDV victimization can help guide programming and health policies, little research has examined whether the prevalence of PDV victimization has increased, decreased, or remained stable over time among non-U.S.-based samples of youth. In addition, few studies have directly tested whether disparities in PDV victimization between boys and girls have narrowed, widened, or remained unchanged in recent years. To address these gaps, we used school-based data from the British Columbia Adolescent Health Survey (BC AHS) of 2003, 2008, and 2013 (n boys = 18,441 and n girls = 17,459) to examine 10-year trends in PDV victimization. We also tested whether trends differed across self-reported sex. Data from the 2003 to 2013 BC AHS revealed that recent PDV victimization rates had significantly decreased among youth overall (5.9%-5.0%) and boys (8.0%-5.8%), but not girls (5.3%-4.2%). Although boys had steeper declines than girls in PDV victimization rates, year-by-sex interactions indicate that the sex gap in PDV victimization had not significantly narrowed. Moreover, rates of PDV victimization over the 10-year period indicated significantly higher rates of PDV victimization among boys compared with girls. Despite positive declines in recent rates of PDV victimization among youth, important differences in rates of PDV victimization between boys and girls remain. These findings underscore the need for greater attention to sex differences in research and programming and health policies to reduce PDV victimization and the sex disparities therein. 

Keywords
adolescent health survey, dating violence, sex differences, trends
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-34560 (URN)10.1177/0886260518788367 (DOI)
Available from: 2018-09-28 Created: 2018-09-28 Last updated: 2018-09-28Bibliographically approved
Kelley, S. E., Balsis, S., Smith, S. T., Edens, J. F., Douglas, K. & Poythress, N. G. . (2016). A dimensional comparison of a self-report and a structured interview measure of conduct disorder. Journal of Personality Disorders, 30(2), 232-241
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A dimensional comparison of a self-report and a structured interview measure of conduct disorder
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2016 (English)In: Journal of Personality Disorders, ISSN 0885-579X, E-ISSN 1943-2763, Vol. 30, no 2, p. 232-241Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Eligibility for a diagnosis of antisocial personality disorder (ASPD) requires evidence of antecedent conduct disorder (CD). Accurately identifying CD may be influenced by various factors, including assessment methodology. The present study used a two-parameter latent variable model to examine the relative performance of a self-report measure and a structured clinical interview in retrospectively detecting the CD spectrum among adult male offenders (N = 1,159). Self-report and clinical interview tended to converge regarding the rank order of severity indicated by CD symptom criteria. In addition, at relatively low levels of CD severity, self-report provided more information about the CD spectrum than did clinical interview. At relatively higher levels of CD severity, however, clinical interview provided more information about the CD spectrum than did self-report. Latent variable models offer a potential means of combining multiple assessment methods in a way that maximizes information gleaned by capitalizing on the contextual strengths of each approach.

National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-29485 (URN)000373868500006 ()25905729 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84962086940 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-12-09 Created: 2016-12-09 Last updated: 2017-11-29Bibliographically approved
Gatner, D. T., Douglas, K. S. & Hart, S. D. (2016). Examining the Incremental and Interactive Effects of Boldness With Meanness and Disinhibition Within the Triarchic Model of Psychopathy. Personality Disorders: Theory, Research, and Treatment, 7(3), 259-268
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Examining the Incremental and Interactive Effects of Boldness With Meanness and Disinhibition Within the Triarchic Model of Psychopathy
2016 (English)In: Personality Disorders: Theory, Research, and Treatment, ISSN 1949-2715, E-ISSN 1949-2723, Vol. 7, no 3, p. 259-268Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The triarchic model of psychopathy (Patrick, Fowles, & Krueger, 2009) comprises 3 phenotypic domains: Meanness, Disinhibition, and Boldness. Ongoing controversy surrounds the relevance of Boldness in the conceptualization and assessment of psychopathy. In the current study, undergraduate students (N = 439) completed the Triarchic Psychopathy Measure (Patrick, 2010) to examine the association between Boldness and a host of theoretically relevant external criteria. Boldness was generally unrelated to either prosocial or harmful criteria. Boldness rarely provided incremental value above or interacted with Meanness and Disinhibition with respect to external criteria. Curvilinear effects of Boldness rarely emerged. The findings suggest that Boldness might not be a central construct in the definition of psychopathic personality disorder. Implications for the 5th edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (American Psychiatric Association, 2013) psychopathic specifier are discussed.

Keywords
antisocial outcomes, assessment, boldness, psychopathy, Triarchic Psychopathy Measure
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-29502 (URN)10.1037/per0000182 (DOI)000386156100006 ()26986961 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84960940278 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-12-12 Created: 2016-12-12 Last updated: 2017-11-29Bibliographically approved
Shaffer, C., Gatner, D., Gray, A. L., Douglas, K. S., Viljoen, J. L., Tweed, R., . . . Gagnon, N. (2016). Incremental and Predictive Validity of the Antisocial Process Screening Device in a Community Sample of Male and Female Ethnic Minority and Caucasian Youth. Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology, 44(8), 1599-1612
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Incremental and Predictive Validity of the Antisocial Process Screening Device in a Community Sample of Male and Female Ethnic Minority and Caucasian Youth
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2016 (English)In: Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology, ISSN 0091-0627, E-ISSN 1573-2835, Vol. 44, no 8, p. 1599-1612Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The Antisocial Process Screening Device (APSD) is a well-supported tool for assessing psychopathic features in youth. However, most research with the APSD has been derived from clinical and forensic samples comprised mainly of male Caucasian and African American adolescents. In this prospective study, the incremental and predictive validity of the self-report APSD for violent and non-violent offending was examined in an ethnically diverse community sample of male and female youth (N = 335) aged 12 to 14. High-school students from a moderate sized city in Western Canada completed the self-report APSD and then completed the Self-Report of Offending 6 months later. Receiver Operating Characteristics analysis indicated that APSD total and subscale scores were predictive of violent and non-violent offending at 6-month follow-up with moderate to large effect sizes. In addition, total scores on the APSD added incremental predictive utility above and beyond traditional criminogenic predictors of youth offending (i.e., prior offending, delinquent peer affiliation, poor school achievement, substance use, low parental monitoring). Although sex differences emerged in the predictive utility of the Impulsivity subscale of the APSD vis-à-vis violent offending, sex did not moderate the relationship between APSD total, Narcissism, or Callous/Unemotional scores and offending. In addition, the predictive utility of the APSD did not vary as a function of the youth’s ethnic background. These findings suggest that: (1) the self-report APSD may have utility for risk or threat assessment with normative school populations, (2) APSD findings from higher risk samples generalize to a lower risk sample of high-school youth, and (3) predictive utility of APSD total scores do not differ across male and female Caucasian and ethnic minority youth.

Keywords
Antisocial process screening device, Ethnicity, Offending, Sex differences, Youth psychopathy
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-29149 (URN)10.1007/s10802-016-0130-3 (DOI)000386116700012 ()26830294 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84991206876 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-10-28 Created: 2016-10-28 Last updated: 2017-11-29Bibliographically approved
Robbe, M. d., de Vogel, V., Wever, E. C., Douglas, K. & Nijman, H. L. I. (2016). Risk and Protective Factors for Inpatient Aggression. Criminal justice and behavior, 43(10), 1364-1385
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Risk and Protective Factors for Inpatient Aggression
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2016 (English)In: Criminal justice and behavior, ISSN 0093-8548, E-ISSN 1552-3594, Vol. 43, no 10, p. 1364-1385Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Dynamic risk and protective factors serve to assess the violence risk level of (forensic) psychiatric patients and offer guidance to clinical interventions. Risk assessment scores on Historical Clinical Risk Management-20 (HCR-20) risk factors and Structured Assessment of Protective Factors for violence risk (SAPROF) protective factors at different treatment stages were compared with violent incidents during treatment for 399 multidisciplinary coded assessments on 185 male and female forensic psychiatric patients. At later stages of treatment, less risk factors and more protective factors were observed, and predictive validities were higher. The HCR-20 and SAPROF scores showed good overall predictive validity for inpatient violence. The combination of risk factors and protective factors was a good predictor of incidents of aggressive behavior for different groups of patients, such as patients with violent or sexual offending histories, patients with major mental illnesses or personality disorders, and patients with a high score on psychopathy. Implications of these findings and recommendations for future research are discussed.

Keywords
risk assessment, violence risk, inpatient aggression, protective factors, treatment stages
National Category
Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-29068 (URN)10.1177/0093854816637889 (DOI)000382941500005 ()2-s2.0-84984853868 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-10-07 Created: 2016-10-07 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
Robbe, M. D., de Vogel, V., Douglas, K. S. & Nijman, H. L. I. (2015). Changes in Dynamic Risk and Protective Factors for Violence During Inpatient Forensic Psychiatric Treatment: Predicting Reductions in Postdischarge Community Recidivism. Law and human behavior, 39(1), 53-61
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Changes in Dynamic Risk and Protective Factors for Violence During Inpatient Forensic Psychiatric Treatment: Predicting Reductions in Postdischarge Community Recidivism
2015 (English)In: Law and human behavior, ISSN 0147-7307, E-ISSN 1573-661X, Vol. 39, no 1, p. 53-61Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Empirical studies have rarely investigated the association between improvements on dynamic risk and protective factors for violence during forensic psychiatric treatment and reduced recidivism after discharge. The present study aimed to evaluate the effects of treatment progress in risk and protective factors on violent recidivism. For a sample of 108 discharged forensic psychiatric patients pre- and posttreatment assessments of risk (HCR-20) and protective factors (SAPROF) were compared. Changes were related to violent recidivism at different follow-up times after discharge. Improvements on risk and protective factors during treatment showed good predictive validity for abstention from violence for short-(1 year) as well as long-term (11 years) follow-up. This study demonstrates the sensitivity of the HCR-20 and the SAPROF to change and shows improvements on dynamic risk and protective factors are associated with lower violent recidivism long after treatment.

Keywords
protective factors, risk assessment, treatment progress, violence, desistance
National Category
Forensic Science Psychiatry Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-24592 (URN)10.1037/lhb0000089 (DOI)000349022200006 ()2-s2.0-84925606052 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2015-03-17 Created: 2015-03-17 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
Fields, S., Edens, J. F., Smith, S. T., Rulseh, A., Donnellan, M. B., Ruiz, M. A., . . . Douglas, K. S. (2015). Examining the Psychometric Properties of the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale Brief Form in Justice-Involved Samples. Psychological Assessment, 27(4), 1211-1218
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Examining the Psychometric Properties of the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale Brief Form in Justice-Involved Samples
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2015 (English)In: Psychological Assessment, ISSN 1040-3590, E-ISSN 1939-134X, Vol. 27, no 4, p. 1211-1218Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Impulsivity is an important component If many forms of psychopathology. Though widely used as an index of this construct, the 30-item Barratt Impulsiveness Scale-11 (HIS-11) has demonstrated questionable psychometric properties in several research reports. An 8-item shortened Version has recently been proposed, the Barran Impulsiveness Scale Brief (BIS-Brief) form, which was designed to overcome some of the limitations of the longer scale. In this report, we examine the internal structure and theoretically relevant external correlates of this new short form in large archival samples of individuals involved in the criminal justice system (prison inmates, substance abusers in mandatory treatment, and forensic inpatients). Confirmatory factor analysis of the BIS-Brief indicates adequate fit following a relatively minor modification. Correlations between the HIS-Brief and an array' of criterion measures other self-report scales, interview-based measures, and behavioral outcomes are consistent with predictions and show relatively little or no decrement in predictive validity when compared with the 30-item HIS-11. Our results suggest that the HIS-Brief is a promising brief measure of impulsivity that evinces good psychometric properties across a range of offender samples.

Keywords
Barran Impulsiveness Scale-11, Barran Impuisneness Scale Brief, criminal offenders, cross-validation, impulsivity
National Category
Social Sciences Psychiatry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-26871 (URN)10.1037/a0039109 (DOI)000366820900009 ()2-s2.0-84927941765 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-01-15 Created: 2016-01-15 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
Guy, L. S., Kusaj, C., Packer, I. K. & Douglas, K. S. (2015). Influence of the HCR-20, LS/CMI, and PCL-R on Decisions About Parole Suitability Among Lifers. Law and human behavior, 39(3), 232-243
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Influence of the HCR-20, LS/CMI, and PCL-R on Decisions About Parole Suitability Among Lifers
2015 (English)In: Law and human behavior, ISSN 0147-7307, E-ISSN 1573-661X, Vol. 39, no 3, p. 232-243Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Among 5,181 inmates indeterminately sentenced to life in California who were evaluated for parole suitability between January 2009 and November 2010, 11% were granted parole. After administration of the HCR-20, LS/CMI, and PCL-R, psychologists judged most inmates (78%) to be at low or moderate risk for future violence. This overall risk rating (ORR) was significantly associated with parole suitability decisions. Moderate to large associations were observed between the ORR and all risk indices. The HCR-20 Clinical and Risk Management scales demonstrated the strongest associations with parole suitability decisions. Among the LS/CMI scales, Procriminal Attitudes and Leisure/Recreation were most predictive of failure to obtain parole. PCL-R scores had little influence on parole suitability decisions beyond the HCR-20 and LS/CMI. Overall, findings suggest parole board members' decisions were consistent with empirically supported practice, in that individuals assessed to be at relatively low risk were far more likely to be granted parole than those assessed to be at moderate or high risk for future violence.

Keywords
HCR-20, long-term inmate, LS/CMI, parole, PCL-R
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-25663 (URN)10.1037/lhb0000111 (DOI)000355838800003 ()25365474 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84930244002 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2015-08-28 Created: 2015-08-18 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
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