miun.sePublications
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Sandström, Jennie
Publications (10 of 11) Show all publications
Sandström, J., Bernes, C., Junninen, K., Lõhmus, A., Macdonald, E., Müller, J. & Jonsson, B.-G. (2019). Impacts of dead-wood manipulation on the biodiversity of temperate and boreal forests - A systematic review. Journal of Applied Ecology, 56(7), 1770-1781
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Impacts of dead-wood manipulation on the biodiversity of temperate and boreal forests - A systematic review
Show others...
2019 (English)In: Journal of Applied Ecology, ISSN 0021-8901, E-ISSN 1365-2664, Vol. 56, no 7, p. 1770-1781Article in journal (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

Dead wood (DW) provides critical habitat for thousands of species in forests, but its amount, quality and diversity have been heavily reduced by forestry. Therefore, interventions aiming to increase DW might be necessary to support its associated biodiversity, even in protected forests, which may be former production forests. Our aim was to synthesize the current state of knowledge drawn from replicated experimental studies into solid quantitative evidence of the effects of DW manipulation on forest biodiversity, with a focus on protected forests.

We conducted a full systematic review of effects of DW manipulation on forest biodiversity in boreal and temperate regions. We included three intervention types: creation of DW from live trees at the site, addition of DW from outside the site and prescribed burning. Outcomes included abundance and species richness of saproxylic insects, ground insects, wood-inhabiting fungi, lichens, reptiles and cavity-nesting birds. In total, we included 91 studies, 37 of which were used in meta-analyses. Although meta-analysis outcomes were heterogeneous, they showed that increasing the amount of DW (“DW enrichment”) has positive effects on the abundance and richness of saproxylic insects and fungi. The positive effect on saproxylic pest insect abundance tended to be less than that on saproxylic insects in general. No significant effects were found for ground insects or cavity-nesting birds.

Although reviewed studies were mainly short term, our results support that management that increases DW amounts has the potential to increase the abundance of DW-dependent species and, in most cases, also their species richness. Studies of burning showed positive effects on the abundance of saproxylic insects similar to those of other interventions, even though burning on average resulted in a smaller enrichment of DW amounts.

Policy implications. The findings of the review suggest that manipulating dead wood (DW) can be an effective part of conservation management to support biodiversity in protected areas. The findings also indicate that the diversity of DW types is important, a mix of DW qualities should be favoured. Burning seems to be an effective method to increase biodiversity but to benefit cavity-nesting birds, snag losses need to be minimized.

Keywords
coarse woody debris, dead wood, diversity, forest conservation, forest restoration, habitat management, prescribed burning, saproxylic species
National Category
Biological Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-34829 (URN)10.1111/1365-2664.13395 (DOI)000474270200023 ()2-s2.0-85066074163 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-10-26 Created: 2018-10-26 Last updated: 2019-08-09Bibliographically approved
Bernes, C., Macura, B., Jonsson, B.-G., Junninen, K., Müller, J., Sandström, J., . . . Macdonald, E. (2018). Manipulating ungulate herbivory in temperate and boreal forests: Effects on vegetation and invertebrates. A systematic review. Environmental Evidence, 7(1), Article ID 13.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Manipulating ungulate herbivory in temperate and boreal forests: Effects on vegetation and invertebrates. A systematic review
Show others...
2018 (English)In: Environmental Evidence, ISSN 2047-2382, E-ISSN 2047-2382, Vol. 7, no 1, article id 13Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Livestock grazing and 'overabundance' of large wild herbivores in forested areas have long been perceived as conflicting with the aims of both silviculture and forest conservation; however, certain kinds of herbivory can help to maintain habitat values in forest ecosystems. Management of mammalian herbivory in protected forests can, therefore, be a critical tool for biodiversity conservation. The primary aim of this systematic review was to examine how forest vegetation and invertebrates are affected by manipulation of the grazing/browsing pressure by livestock or wild ungulates. The ultimate purpose was to investigate whether such manipulation is useful for conserving or restoring biodiversity in forest set-asides. Methods: We considered studies of manipulated ungulate herbivory in forests anywhere within the boreal and temperate zones, not only in protected areas but also in production forest. Non-intervention or alternative levels of intervention were used as comparators. Relevant outcomes included abundance, diversity and composition of plants and invertebrates, tree regeneration, and performance of focal/target species. Studies were mainly selected from a recent systematic map of the evidence on biodiversity effects of forest management relevant to protected areas. Additional studies were identified through updated searches online and in bibliographies of existing reviews. Relevant studies were critically appraised, and studies with low or unclear validity were excluded from the review. Quantitative outcomes were extracted from 103 articles, and summary effect sizes were derived by meta-analysis. Results: Most of the 144 studies included in the review had been conducted in North America, Europe or Australia/New Zealand. The intervention most commonly studied was experimental exclusion (or enclosure) of wild and/or domestic ungulates by fencing. Other studies examined culling of wild ungulates or compared forests long grazed by livestock to ungrazed forests. Effects on vegetation and invertebrates were reported in 135 and 23 of the studies, respectively. We found negative responses to herbivory in the abundance of understorey vegetation as a whole, woody understorey and bryophytes, and also in the species richness of woody understorey vegetation, whereas the richness of forbs and bryophytes responded positively. Several effects depended on ungulate origins: Understorey abundance responded negatively to livestock and to ungulates introduced into the wild, but not to native ones. In contrast, understorey species richness responded positively to livestock but not to wild ungulates. The duration and intensity of herbivory had few significant effects on vegetation - exceptions included woody understorey abundance and richness, which decreased with increasing duration and intensity, respectively. Among invertebrates we found negative responses to herbivory in the abundance of lepidopterans and spiders, but no significant effects on species richness. Conclusions: Our review revealed a large body of high-validity experimental studies on impacts of ungulate herbivory in forests. This evidence confirmed that manipulation of such herbivory is often highly influential on tree regeneration and on the abundance, diversity and composition of understorey vegetation. Nevertheless, we also identified important knowledge gaps - we found few studies of boreal areas, long-term herbivory effects, impacts on bryophytes, lichens and invertebrates, and effects of manipulation less radical than total exclusion of ungulates. 

Keywords
Biodiversity, Deer, Forest conservation, Forest restoration, Forest set-aside, Herbivory, Livestock, Natural regeneration, Silvopastoral system, Wood-pasture
National Category
Biological Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-33695 (URN)10.1186/s13750-018-0125-3 (DOI)000446168000001 ()2-s2.0-85046121337 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-06-01 Created: 2018-06-01 Last updated: 2018-11-15Bibliographically approved
Sandström, J. (2018). Old-Growth Forests in the High Coast Region in Sweden and Active Management in Forest Set-Asides. (Doctoral dissertation). Sundsvall: Mid Sweden University
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Old-Growth Forests in the High Coast Region in Sweden and Active Management in Forest Set-Asides
2018 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

In today´s intensively managed landscape, very few forests with old-growth characteristics and little human impact exist. One of the rare exceptions is pine forests on rocky soils, a forest type which has probably escaped extensive human use because of its low productivity. Our objective was to investigate the structure, dynamics, and history as well as the abundance and richness of wood-inhabiting fungi in these types of forest. We chose rocky pine forests situated in the High Coast Region to exemplify this forest type since the regional County Administration had already made surveys of the conservation value in 26 rocky pine forest stands in this region. We investigated the forests by recording tree species and measuring tree size and age in eight of the stands that were ranked with the highest conservation value. We also sampled dead wood to examine time since death and we sampled living and dead trees with fire scars to date fires. In addition, we made an inventory of wood-inhabiting fruiting bodies and took woodchip samples from logs to learn (by DNA analysis) whether five rare wood inhabiting fungi species were present as mycelia in logs.

We found that rocky pine forests in the High Coast Region have a multi-sizedand multi-aged structure and old pine trees (approximately 13 ha-1 older than 300 years) are present. Fire has been common (an average of 42 years betweenfires) but they were likely to have been low-intense and small. Although the amount of dead wood is relatively low (4.4 m3 ha-1 on average) compared to many other boreal forests with old-growth characteristics, the share of deadwood of the total tree basal area (18%) was in line with other pine forests with low levels of human impact. The low dead wood volume is therefore likely to be an effect of the low productivity rather than dead wood extraction by humans. We also discovered that dead wood can be present for a really longtime without totally decomposing; we found logs and snags that had been dead for 500 years. This continuity of dead wood might be important for organisms dependent on dead wood as a substrate and even though we found that the species richness of wood-inhabiting fungi was somewhat low, we did find some rare species. Cinereomyces lenis and Hyphodontia halonata were present as fruiting bodies and we also found Antrodia albobrunnea, Antrodiainfirma, Crustoderma corneum and Anomoporia kamtschatica present as myceliain logs.

The second part of this thesis reports two systematic reviews studying the effects of active management on the biodiversity in boreal and temperate forests. A systematic review follows certain guidelines and aims to compile the evidence base in well-defined topics, so that managers, researchers and policymakers can gain access to a high-quality compilation of current research. In our systematic map, we found almost 800 relevant papers but the set of papers turned out to be too heterogenic (many intervention types, e.g. thinning, burning, grazing and many types of outcomes) to allow any quantitative analysis. However, this map identified knowledge gaps and several detailed research questions that had sufficient data to provide aquantitative statistical analysis.

One of these questions was: What is the impact of dead wood creation or addition on dead wood-dependent species? We focused on three types of interventions: creation of dead wood, addition of dead wood from elsewhere and prescribed burning. The selected outcomes were: saproxylic insects (rareand pest species), saproxylic fungi (rare species), ground-living insects and cavity-nesting birds. There was no significant negative effect on any of the investigated species groups but a positive effect on the abundance and richness of saproxylic insects and fungi. We also found that, although the amount of dead wood created was much less (50%) with prescribed burning, the abundance and richness of saproxylic insects showed similar positive effects to those of other intervention methods. A likely explanation for this is that burning results in a diversity of dead wood of various levels of quality (e.g. dense and/or charred wood), which creates a heterogeneity of dead woodtypes having a positive effect on the diversity of species dependent on deadwood. In summary, active management generally has a positive effect on biodiversity but the choice of management type should always be made carefully, and in consideration of the effect you want to achieve. In addition, there is a need for more long-term primary studies and more species groups in more geographical areas need to be incorporated so that the systematic reviews in this field will be even more informative in the future.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sundsvall: Mid Sweden University, 2018. p. 52
Series
Mid Sweden University doctoral thesis, ISSN 1652-893X ; 287
Keywords
Coarse woody debris, Dead wood, Dendrochronology, Fire history, Forest conservation, Forest structure, Log, Meta-analysis, Pine heath forest, Prescribed burning, Saproxylic fungi, Saproxylic beetles, Snag, Wood-inhabiting fungi, Aktiv skötselmetod, Bevarandebiologi, Brandhistorik, Dendrokronologi, Död ved, Hällmarkstallskog, Lågproduktiv skog, Meta-analys, Naturvård, Naturvårdsbrand, Skogsstruktur, Solbelyst död ved, Stock, Torraka, Vedlevande svamp, Vedlevande insekter, Åldersstruktur
National Category
Biological Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-34830 (URN)978-91-88527-65-3 (ISBN)
Public defence
2018-11-16, L111, Holmg. 10, Sundsvall, 10:15 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Note

Vid tidpunkten för disputationen var följande delarbeten opublicerade: delarbete 1 (manuskript), delarbete 2 (manuskript), delarbete 4 (inskickat).

At the time of the doctoral defence the following papers were unpublished: paper 1 (manuscript), paper 2 (manuscript), paper 4 (submitted).

Available from: 2018-10-26 Created: 2018-10-26 Last updated: 2018-10-26Bibliographically approved
Bernes, C., Jonsson, B. G., Junninen, K., Lõhmus, A., Macdonald, E., Müller, J. & Sandström, J. (2016). What are the impacts of manipulating grazing and browsing by ungulates on plants and invertebrates in temperate and boreal forests?: A systematic review protocol. Environmental Evidence, 5(1), Article ID 17.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>What are the impacts of manipulating grazing and browsing by ungulates on plants and invertebrates in temperate and boreal forests?: A systematic review protocol
Show others...
2016 (English)In: Environmental Evidence, ISSN 2047-2382, E-ISSN 2047-2382, Vol. 5, no 1, article id 17Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Livestock grazing and 'overabundance' of large wild herbivores in forested areas have long been perceived as conflicting with the aims of both silviculture and forest conservation; however, certain kinds of herbivory can help to maintain habitat values in forest ecosystems. Management of grazing/browsing in protected forests can, therefore, be a critical tool for biodiversity conservation. However, it is not clear what impacts of wild ungulates or livestock are tolerable or desirable in forests set aside for conservation or restoration. The primary aim of the proposed systematic review is to clarify how the diversity of plants and invertebrates is affected by manipulation of the grazing/browsing pressure by livestock or wild ungulates. The ultimate purpose of the review is to investigate whether such manipulation is useful as a means of conserving or restoring biodiversity in forest set-asides. Methods: The review will examine primary field studies of how fencing or other kinds of manipulation of the grazing/browsing pressure by livestock or wild ungulates affects plants or invertebrates. We will consider studies made in boreal or temperate forests anywhere in the world, incorporating investigations made not only in protected areas but also in stands under commercial management. Non-intervention or alternative levels of grazing pressure will be used as comparators. Relevant outcomes include abundance, diversity and composition of plants and invertebrates, tree regeneration, and performance of focal/target species. Relevant studies will mainly be selected from a recent systematic map of the evidence on biodiversity impacts of active management in forest set-asides. A search update will be made with a subset of the search terms used for the systematic map. Searches for additional literature will be made in bibliographies of existing reviews. Relevant studies will be subject to critical appraisal and categorised as having high, medium or low susceptibility to bias. Studies with high susceptibility to bias will be excluded from the review. Useful outcomes and data on interventions and other potential effect modifiers will be extracted from included articles. A narrative synthesis will describe the quality and findings of all studies in the review. Where studies report similar outcomes, meta-analysis will be performed.

Keywords
Biodiversity, Deer, Elk, Forest conservation, Forest reserve, Forest restoration, Forest set-aside, Herbivory, Livestock, Moose, Semi-natural habitat, Silvopastoral system, Wood-pasture
National Category
Biological Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-29296 (URN)10.1186/s13750-016-0070-y (DOI)2-s2.0-84992223368 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-11-14 Created: 2016-11-14 Last updated: 2017-11-29Bibliographically approved
Bernes, C., Jonsson, B.-G., Junninen, K., Lõhmus, A., Macdonald, E., Müller, J. & Sandström, J. (2015). What is the impact of active management on biodiversity in boreal and temperate forests set aside for conservation or restoration?: A systematic map. Environmental Evidence, 4(1), Article ID 25.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>What is the impact of active management on biodiversity in boreal and temperate forests set aside for conservation or restoration?: A systematic map
Show others...
2015 (English)In: Environmental Evidence, ISSN 2047-2382, E-ISSN 2047-2382, Vol. 4, no 1, article id 25Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: The biodiversity of forests set aside from forestry is often considered best preserved by non-intervention. In many protected forests, however, remaining biodiversity values are legacies of past disturbances, e.g. recurring fires, grazing or small-scale felling. These forests may need active management to keep the characteristics that were the reason for setting them aside. Such management can be particularly relevant where lost ecological values need to be restored. In this review, we identified studies on a variety of interventions that could be useful for conserving or restoring any aspect of forest biodiversity in boreal and temperate regions. Since the review is based on Swedish initiatives, we have focused on forest types that are represented in Sweden, but such forests exist in many parts of the world. The wide scope of the review means that the set of studies is quite heterogeneous. As a first step towards a more complete synthesis, therefore, we have compiled a systematic map. Such a map gives an overview of the evidence base by providing a database with descriptions of relevant studies, but it does not synthesise reported results. Methods: Searches for literature were made using online publication databases, search engines, specialist websites and literature reviews. Search terms were developed in English, Finnish, French, German, Russian and Swedish. We searched not only for studies of interventions in actual forest set-asides, but also for appropriate evidence from commercially managed forests, since some practices applied there may be useful for conservation or restoration purposes too. Identified articles were screened for relevance using criteria set out in an a priori protocol. Descriptions of included studies are available in an Excel file, and also in an interactive GIS application that can be accessed at an external website. Results: Our searches identified nearly 17,000 articles. The 798 articles that remained after screening for relevance described 812 individual studies. Almost two-thirds of the included studies were conducted in North America, whereas most of the rest were performed in Europe. Of the European studies, 58 % were conducted in Finland or Sweden. The interventions most commonly studied were partial harvesting, prescribed burning, thinning, and grazing or exclusion from grazing. The outcomes most frequently reported were effects of interventions on trees, other vascular plants, dead wood, vertical stand structure and birds. Outcome metrics included e.g. abundance, richness of species (or genera), diversity indices, and community composition based on ordinations. Conclusions: This systematic map identifies a wealth of evidence on the impact of active management practices that could be utilised to conserve or restore biodiversity in forest set-asides. As such it should be of value to e.g. conservation managers, researchers and policymakers. Moreover, since the map also highlights important knowledge gaps, it could inspire new primary research on topics that have so far not been well covered. Finally, it provides a foundation for systematic reviews on specific subtopics. Based on our map of the evidence, we identified four subtopics that are sufficiently covered by existing studies to allow full systematic reviewing, potentially including meta-analysis. © 2015 Bernes et al.

Keywords
Biodiversity, Boreal forest, Browsing, Dead wood, Disturbance legacy, Forest conservation, Forest reserve, Forest restoration, Forest set-aside, Grazing, Habitat management, Partial harvesting, Prescribed burning, Temperate forest, Thinning
National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-26907 (URN)10.1186/s13750-015-0050-7 (DOI)000449406700025 ()2-s2.0-84952330057 (Scopus ID)
Note

Article

Available from: 2016-01-25 Created: 2016-01-25 Last updated: 2019-11-12Bibliographically approved
Bernes, C., Jonsson, B. G., Junninen, K., Asko, L., McDonald, E., Müller, J. & Sandström, J. (2014). What is the impact of active management on biodiversity in forests set aside for conservation or restoration?: A systematic review protocol. Environmental Evidence, 3(22)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>What is the impact of active management on biodiversity in forests set aside for conservation or restoration?: A systematic review protocol
Show others...
2014 (English)In: Environmental Evidence, ISSN 2047-2382, E-ISSN 2047-2382, Vol. 3, no 22Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background

The traditional approach to limiting impacts of forestry on biodiversity is to set aside forest areas of particular conservation interest, either as formally protected reserves or on a voluntary basis. Many set-asides are left more or less untouched, but some of them have a history of disturbances such as wildfires, forest grazing, coppicing or small-scale felling. Such areas may gradually lose the qualities that were to be safeguarded unless the disturbances are re-introduced (e.g. by burning) or replaced with alternatives (e.g. gap-felling). Active management of forest set-asides may be particularly relevant in areas where the biota has been impoverished by intensive and large-scale harvesting. Here, biodiversity may not be able to recover adequately without restoration measures such as gap-felling or creation of dead wood.

In recent years, interest in active management of forest set-asides has increased, but opinions differ among conservationists on how such management should be balanced against non-intervention. The topic of the proposed systematic review has therefore met approval among stakeholders in Sweden, where it is currently an issue of high concern.

Methods

The review will examine primary field studies of how various forms of active management have affected biodiversity in boreal or temperate forests set aside for conservation or restoration. The primary focus will be on forest types represented in Sweden. In some cases, useful insights about management options may also be provided by studies of interventions in commercially managed forests. Non-intervention or alternative forms of active management will be used as comparators. Relevant outcomes include assemblage diversity (species richness, diversity indices), abundance of different functional or taxonomic groups of organisms, population viability of target species, and indicators of forest biodiversity such as forest structure and amounts of dead wood.

The relevant scientific literature may turn out to be very heterogeneous, however. Numerous combinations of management forms and biodiversity outcomes can be conceived, and it remains to be seen whether any such combination is covered by sufficiently many studies to allow a meaningful meta-analysis. Nonetheless, it should be feasible to achieve a useful narrative synthesis of the available evidence.

National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-23999 (URN)10.1186/2047-2382-3-22 (DOI)2-s2.0-84950242461 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2014-12-22 Created: 2014-12-22 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
Sandström, J. (2013). Phytoplankton response to a changing climate in lakes in northern Sweden. (Licentiate dissertation). Sundsvall: Mid Sweden University
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Phytoplankton response to a changing climate in lakes in northern Sweden
2013 (English)Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

In a climate change perspective, increased air temperatures are already a reality and are expected to increase even more in the future, especially in areas at high latitudes. The present thesis therefore addresses the influence of climate change on the physical properties and the phytoplankton communities of typical small and oligotrophic lakes in northern Sweden (62-64˚N). In the first part of the study, we found a significant trend (10 lakes from 1916 to 2010) of ice break-ups occurring increasingly earlier. The timing of ice break-up was strongly influenced by the April air temperature indicating that expected increases in air temperature in the future will also result in an earlier ice break-up. We also used concentrations of chlorophyll a (chl a) as estimations of phytoplankton biomass and discovered a positive relationship between surface water temperature and concentrations of chl a in Lake Remmaren (from 1991 to 2008). The second part of the thesis focuses on climatic conditions and cyanobacteria abundance in three small, oligotrophic lakes in northern Sweden; Lake Remmaren, Lake S. Bergsjön and Lake Gransjön. The concentration and relative abundance of cyanobacteria differ between 2011 and 2012, with different climatic conditions. The "warm" year of 2011 had higher concentrations and relative abundance of cyanobacteria than the "cold" year of 2012. Trends in increasing surface water temperatures as well as increasing abundance of cyanobacteria in August were found in Lake Remmaren (from 1988 to 2011). The direct or indirect effects of warming had a positive effect on the cyanobacteria abundance, since nutrients (Tot N and Tot P) did not display an increasing trend in Lake Remmaren. An analysis on the composition of phytoplankton species in Lake Remmaren, Lake S. Bergsjön and Lake Gransjön revealed that the cyanobacteria Merismopedia sp. was more common in 2011 than 2012. If different cyanobacteria become more common in oligotrophic lakes in the future, the functioning of lake ecosystems may be impacted. Small zooplankton eats small phytoplankton and if smaller phytoplankton species, e.g. cyanobacteria, increase at the expense of other phytoplankton groups, an extra step in the food chain might be added. Less energy might be transferred to the upper levels because many cyanobacteria contain toxic compounds and are less edible than other phytoplankton groups. An increase of toxic containing cyanobacteria in lakes can also make lakes less attractive for recreational purposes in the future.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sundsvall: Mid Sweden University, 2013. p. 28
Series
Mid Sweden University licentiate thesis, ISSN 1652-8948 ; 103
Keywords
Climate change, cyanobacteria, ice break-up, oligotrophic lakes, phytoplankton, temperature
National Category
Biological Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-20014 (URN)978-91-87103-97-1 (ISBN)
Supervisors
Available from: 2013-10-17 Created: 2013-10-17 Last updated: 2014-02-03Bibliographically approved
Sandström, J. & Ekelund, N.Climate warming influences the timing of ice break-up and phytoplankton chlorophyll a in northern Sweden..
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Climate warming influences the timing of ice break-up and phytoplankton chlorophyll a in northern Sweden.
(English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
National Category
Biological Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-20011 (URN)
Available from: 2013-10-17 Created: 2013-10-17 Last updated: 2013-10-17Bibliographically approved
Sandström, J. & Ekelund, N.Climatic impact on the abundance of cyanobacteria in oligotrophic lakes in northern Sweden.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Climatic impact on the abundance of cyanobacteria in oligotrophic lakes in northern Sweden
(English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
National Category
Biological Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-20012 (URN)
Available from: 2013-10-17 Created: 2013-10-17 Last updated: 2013-10-17Bibliographically approved
Sandström, J., Edman, M. & Jonsson, B.-G.Rocky pine forests in the High Coast Region in Sweden: structure, dynamics and history.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Rocky pine forests in the High Coast Region in Sweden: structure, dynamics and history
(English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
National Category
Biological Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-34827 (URN)
Available from: 2018-10-26 Created: 2018-10-26 Last updated: 2018-10-26Bibliographically approved
Organisations

Search in DiVA

Show all publications