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Ioannides, Dimitri, Professor of Human GeographyORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-3549-750X
Publications (10 of 55) Show all publications
Ioannides, D., Röslmaier, M. & van der Zee, E. (2018). Airbnb as an instigator of ‘tourism bubble’ expansion in Utrecht's Lombok neighbourhood. Tourism Geographies, 1-19
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Airbnb as an instigator of ‘tourism bubble’ expansion in Utrecht's Lombok neighbourhood
2018 (English)In: Tourism Geographies, ISSN 1461-6688, E-ISSN 1470-1340, p. 1-19Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

The Airbnb phenomenon as part of the broader growth of the so-called collaborative economy has grabbed the attention of a growing number of tourism researchers. Among the topics explored have been investigations as to the spatial tendencies of Airbnb in cities and discussions concerning its effects, inter alia, on gentrification, over-touristification and eventual resident displacement. Recognizing that the majority of extant studies have been conducted either in major cities, which in their own right attract large numbers of visitors or in tourism-intensive smaller communities we chose to investigate what Airbnb growth means for a mid-sized city with a highly diversified economy, which is not yet over-touristified. Our focus was on the Dutch city of Utrecht. Through a geospatial and statistical analysis of AirDNA data, we explored the growth of Airbnbs in the city overall, focusing specifically on the phenomenon's effects on the Lombok neighbourhood, a nascent ‘neo-bohemia’ neighbouring the city-centre tourist bubble. Our analysis reveals that although Airbnb activity in this neighbourhood is relatively recent there are signs suggesting that further touristification of parts of Lombok has ignited increased Airbnb activity. Moreover, there is a distance decay of Airbnb activity as one moves away from the city centre and from established tourism services including restaurants. These findings suggest that in an emerging neo-bohemian space such as Lombok, Airbnb takes on a role as instigator of urban tourism bubble expansion. The study ends with a call for further investigations to better understand the implications expanded Airbnb activity has, among others, on social justice within cities. For example, future investigations could examine the manner in which Airbnbs influence the everyday life of the residents of urban spaces and investigate the conflicts that might arise in Airbnb ghettoes between visitors and locals. 

Keywords
Airbnb listings, collaborative economy, Lombok, neo-bohemia, urban tourist bubble, Utrecht
National Category
Other Social Sciences not elsewhere specified
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-33631 (URN)10.1080/14616688.2018.1454505 (DOI)
Note

Published online: 03 Apr 2018

Available from: 2018-05-15 Created: 2018-05-15 Last updated: 2018-05-15Bibliographically approved
Rodriguez-Giron, S., Vanneste, D. & Ioannides, D. (2018). An intergrative model (iModel) for decision-making in tourism. Tourism Planning & Development
Open this publication in new window or tab >>An intergrative model (iModel) for decision-making in tourism
2018 (English)In: Tourism Planning & Development, ISSN 2156-8316, E-ISSN 2156-8324Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

This article contributes to the conceptual and methodological strengthening of the study of tourism as a complex phenomenon using systems thinking. It is aimed at supporting decision-making for tourist destinations’ planning and management. Few authors provide a schematic model of how tourism works, and among them, even fewer expressly use a systemic approach. However, nobody presents a methodology for their models’ analytical application to bridge theory and practice. The integrative model (iModel) fills this gap. It is developed through a review of previous models, research in Belgian, German and Ecuadorian cases, discussion in experts’ panels and supported by a long experience in destination development in Ecuador. Main contributions are 1) the introduction of a model of tourism as a dynamic complex system based on the functions performed by the actors involved in the tourism experience; and 2) the presentation of a methodology to apply the model-as-a-tool for decision-making support in tourism practice.

Keywords
Analytical application; decision-making; iModel; methodology; systems thinking; tourism planning and management
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-34282 (URN)10.1080/21568316.2018.1506818 (DOI)
Available from: 2018-08-20 Created: 2018-08-20 Last updated: 2018-08-31Bibliographically approved
Margaryan, L., Prince, S., Ioannides, D. & Röslmaier, M. (2018). Dancing with Cranes: A humanist perspective of cultural ecosystem services of wetlands. Tourism Geographies
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Dancing with Cranes: A humanist perspective of cultural ecosystem services of wetlands
2018 (English)In: Tourism Geographies, ISSN 1461-6688, E-ISSN 1470-1340Article in journal (Refereed) In press
Abstract [en]

Cultural ecosystem services (CES) are important spatial elements providinghumans with recreational, aesthetic, spiritual and other benefits. Yet, because of their immaterial, subjective, qualitative and unmeasurable nature, this means that scientists,decision-makersand general public oftenfind their value difficult to grasp. Weenrich the CES approach with theoretical insights from humanistgeography, where we frame CESas arising from perpetual interactions between humans and their environment.Places are formed through various processes, both organic and planned, which endow people with unique identities, experiences, capabilities, knowledge and skills.We use the rural wetland area of Lake Hornborga, Sweden, with its complex history of restoration phases, to explore theprofound interrelations betweenenvironmental spaces and cultural practices expressed in the everyday activities of learning, playing, creating, caring, producing, and consuming. The data was collected through qualitative methods, including interviews, observations and a focused group interview, in order to capture these unique senses and experiences. The findings outline CES as key drivers behind the formation of place, rather than mere labels for inventoryingbenefits people receive from nature. The presence of the iconic migratory crane is especially conducive to a positive sense of place and the practice of various activities, including tourism, around the wetland. We frame the implications for planning and future research of our findings within a context of ethics.

Keywords
cultural ecosystem services, place making, cranes, wetlands, Sweden, case study
National Category
Other Social Sciences not elsewhere specified Human Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-34757 (URN)10.1080/14616688.2018.1522512 (DOI)
Available from: 2018-10-23 Created: 2018-10-23 Last updated: 2018-10-23Bibliographically approved
Wallstam, M., Ioannides, D. & Pettersson, R. (2018). Evaluating the social impacts of events: in search of unified indicators for effective policymaking. Journal of Policy Research in Tourism, Leisure and Events
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Evaluating the social impacts of events: in search of unified indicators for effective policymaking
2018 (English)In: Journal of Policy Research in Tourism, Leisure and Events, ISSN 1940-7963, E-ISSN 1940-7971Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Policymakers in destinations regularly struggle to identify effective ways to evaluate the impacts of planned events. Especially problematic is the relative lack of knowledge about the social impacts that planned events incur. This challenge is largely attributable to the historic focus on economic impacts. However, this trend is shifting along with the realization that events often fail to deliver on promised economic trickle-down effects. This paper addresses the absence of a unified view on social impacts, and how this impedes destinations that aspire to work strategically with planned events. Policymakers at the destination level currently lack the common language needed to effectively measure these impacts. We use a Delphi approach to pinpoint social impact indicators that are of use in policy settings. The results show six indicators that meet the study criteria, thereby contributing towards a unified set of indicators for dealing with strategic event management at the destination level.

Keywords
Delphi, destination management, event portfolio, Events, social impacts
National Category
Other Social Sciences not elsewhere specified
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-34608 (URN)10.1080/19407963.2018.1515214 (DOI)
Available from: 2018-10-03 Created: 2018-10-03 Last updated: 2018-11-21Bibliographically approved
Prince, S. & Ioannides, D. (2017). Contextualizing the complexities of managing alternative tourism at the community-level: A case study of a nordic eco-village. Tourism Management, 60(June), 348-356
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Contextualizing the complexities of managing alternative tourism at the community-level: A case study of a nordic eco-village
2017 (English)In: Tourism Management, ISSN 0261-5177, E-ISSN 1879-3193, Vol. 60, no June, p. 348-356Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

To shed light on the complexities of fostering sustainability through alternative tourism, we explore the managerial contradictions and difficulties that arise as alternative tourism is developed in the name of sustainability at Sólheimar eco-village in Iceland. Following a focused ethnographic approach, we establish that those behind the management of volunteers, students and other guests regularly struggle to coordinate these respective groups in a manner that balances economic objectives with those relating to the environment and social equity. This is because limited human resources and strategic knowledge exist to fulfill all the host community’s goals through alternative tourism. The findings reveal the need to conceptualize alternative tourism as a forum for discussion between host and guest over the complexities of generating sustainable development.  This highlights the need for knowledge transmission over matters such as conflict resolution, critical reflection and cultural communication associated with the tourist experience at the community.

 

Keywords
Sustainability, alternative tourism, Iceland, volunteer tourism, focused ethnography.
National Category
Human Geography Other Social Sciences not elsewhere specified
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-29796 (URN)10.1016/j.tourman.2016.12.015 (DOI)000395599600037 ()2-s2.0-85007248633 (Scopus ID)ETOUR (Local ID)ETOUR (Archive number)ETOUR (OAI)
Note

Available online 27 December 2016

Available from: 2016-12-29 Created: 2016-12-29 Last updated: 2017-08-18Bibliographically approved
Wall-Reinius, S., Ioannides, D. & Zampoukos, K. (2017). Does Geography Matter in All-Inclusive Resort Tourism?: An investigation of the marketing approach of major Scandinavian Tour operators. Tourism Geographies
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Does Geography Matter in All-Inclusive Resort Tourism?: An investigation of the marketing approach of major Scandinavian Tour operators
2017 (English)In: Tourism Geographies, ISSN 1461-6688, E-ISSN 1470-1340Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Over the last decade, there has been noticeable rise in popularity of all-inclusive holidays. This growth has coincided with the propensity in many destinations to develop tourism enclaves, which can either be purpose-built gated resorts physically isolated from their surrounding community or appear in the form of cruises, which have emerged as a particularly popular form of travel. In this explorative paper, we focus on the marketing of all-inclusive holidays, specifically those occurring in enclaves (including cruise-ships). We investigate to what extent the geographic location of the tourist enclave is an important consideration for the travel industry. In other words, when it comes to all-inclusive holiday products, do the place-based attributes on offer at the destination and the actual location of the holiday matter from the perspective of those who are creating and selling the travel packet? An explorative study of Scandinavian tour operators shows that the local settingof the holiday is in fact a secondary consideration compared to the services and facilities on offer. Thus, there is an overriding tendency to downplay the destination’s place-based attributes and it does not seem so important where the all-inclusive resort is located as long as it is well connected to the market and promises a comfortable holiday to the consumer. Tourism enclaves in the context of placelessness are discussed.

Keywords
All-inclusive resorts; cruises; enclave tourism; marketing; placelessness; Scandinavia
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-32533 (URN)10.1080/14616688.2017.1375975 (DOI)
Available from: 2017-12-19 Created: 2017-12-19 Last updated: 2017-12-22Bibliographically approved
Ankre, R., Kronenberg, K. & Ioannides, D. (2017). Möjligheter och utmaningar för tillgänglighet till friluftsliv och naturupplevelser: En fallstudie om Östersunds kommun. Östersund: Mid Sweden University
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Möjligheter och utmaningar för tillgänglighet till friluftsliv och naturupplevelser: En fallstudie om Östersunds kommun
2017 (Swedish)Report (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Östersund: Mid Sweden University, 2017
Series
Rapportserien / European Tourism Research Institute, ISSN 1403-4220 ; 2017:3
National Category
Other Social Sciences not elsewhere specified
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-33590 (URN)978-91-88527-41-7 (ISBN)
Available from: 2018-05-08 Created: 2018-05-08 Last updated: 2018-05-09Bibliographically approved
Stoffelen, A., Ioannides, D. & Vanneste, D. (2017). Obstacles to achieving cross-border tourism governance: A multi-scalar approach focusing on the German-Czech borderlands. Annals of Tourism Research, 64, 126-138
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Obstacles to achieving cross-border tourism governance: A multi-scalar approach focusing on the German-Czech borderlands
2017 (English)In: Annals of Tourism Research, ISSN 0160-7383, E-ISSN 1873-7722, Vol. 64, p. 126-138Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper aims to identify distinctive obstacles to the establishment of tourism destination governance in both transnational and within-country borderlands. Analysis of the German-Czech borderlands, a region also incorporating within-country borders between three German federal states, indicates the multi-scalar and political contestations of cross-border tourism collaboration. Local tourism projects are generally successful, both on a transnational German-Czech level and between the German states of Bavaria, Saxony and Thuringia. However, structural cross-border destination management does not exist because of (transnational) multi-scalar institutional alignment problems and (internal) tourism-specific destination-level power contestations. Understanding destination management processes in borderlands, therefore, requires: (i) explicit multi-scalar analysis; (ii) recognition of both transnational and within-country contexts; (iii) more cross-pollination between tourism planning and cross-border governance research.

Keywords
Border regions, Cross-border cooperation, Cross-border tourism, Destination management, Multi-level governance, Tourism planning
National Category
Other Social Sciences not elsewhere specified
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-30656 (URN)10.1016/j.annals.2017.03.003 (DOI)000401675900011 ()2-s2.0-85016147115 (Scopus ID)ETOUR (Local ID)ETOUR (Archive number)ETOUR (OAI)
Note

Available online 25 March 2017

Available from: 2017-04-25 Created: 2017-04-25 Last updated: 2017-08-10Bibliographically approved
Ankre, R., Ioannides, D. & Kronenberg, K. (2017). Opportunities and Challenges for Accessibility to Outdoor Recreation in an Urban Environment: A Case Study of Östersund, Sweden. In: : . Paper presented at International Symposium on Society and Resource Management (ISSRM) June 19-22, 2017 in Umeå, Sweden.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Opportunities and Challenges for Accessibility to Outdoor Recreation in an Urban Environment: A Case Study of Östersund, Sweden
2017 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Practically all Swedes enjoy being out in nature and engaging in outdoor recreation activities. An important reason behind this is that they benefit from the Swedish Public Right of Access (Allemansrätten). Outdoor recreation is highlighted as a major contributor to good health, leads to a higher level of understanding of nature in an urban society, and can function as a means of integration and sustainable development. However, society and our constant search for new experiences are changing as does the practice of outdoor recreation.

It is of interest to identify how different users participate in outdoor recreation and use nature. Previous studies show that outdoor recreation often is conducted close to where we live. Planning and management, along with information, are vital components leading to the accessibility and development of outdoor recreation. Accessibility for outdoor recreation relate to both physical and socio-economic conditions. Today, outdoor recreation for urban dwellers is highly dependent on access to natural areas close to cities, yet open spaces are increasingly under threat due to urban growth and development density. The Public Right of Access places new demands on future planning and management, for example in order to prevent conflicts with private landowners as there may be increased pressure on specific natural areas.

The above issues are analyzed from the results of an online survey conducted in autumn 2016. The survey was sent to 3,000 randomly selected residents in Östersund, Sweden (response rate 32%). Additionally, municipal planning documents are examined. The results show that the respondents do not consider that access to nature is constrained. Rather they feel they lack the time to make full use of this accessibility. They also express a need for more information about nature areas. The results also show that those with higher education and higher income value outdoor recreation higher, but that they also have less time.

National Category
Other Social Sciences not elsewhere specified
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-31623 (URN)
Conference
International Symposium on Society and Resource Management (ISSRM) June 19-22, 2017 in Umeå, Sweden
Available from: 2017-09-14 Created: 2017-09-14 Last updated: 2017-09-22Bibliographically approved
Alebaki, M. & Ioannides, D. (2017). Threats and obstacles to resilience: Insights from Greece's wine tourism (1ed.). In: Joseph M. Cheer and Alan A. Lew (Ed.), Tourism, Resilience and Sustainability: Adapting to Social, Political and Economic Change (pp. 132-148). Abingdon, Oxon, UK: Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Threats and obstacles to resilience: Insights from Greece's wine tourism
2017 (English)In: Tourism, Resilience and Sustainability: Adapting to Social, Political and Economic Change / [ed] Joseph M. Cheer and Alan A. Lew, Abingdon, Oxon, UK: Routledge, 2017, 1, p. 132-148Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Abingdon, Oxon, UK: Routledge, 2017 Edition: 1
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-31442 (URN)978-1-138-20678-6 (ISBN)978-1-315-46405-3 (ISBN)
Available from: 2017-08-20 Created: 2017-08-20 Last updated: 2017-08-21Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-3549-750X

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