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Jong, M., Kristiansen, L., Jong, M. C. & Falkenberg, T. (2019). Integrative Nursing in Sweden (2ed.). In: Mary Koithan; Mary Jo Kreitzer (Ed.), Integrative Nursing: (pp. 652-662). New York: Oxford University Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Integrative Nursing in Sweden
2019 (English)In: Integrative Nursing / [ed] Mary Koithan; Mary Jo Kreitzer, New York: Oxford University Press, 2019, 2, p. 652-662Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This chapter describes the existing “core” of caring/nursing in the Nordic tradition and how that can be merged with the concepts of integrative nursing to form a vision and strategy for the future. Terms such as integrative nursing are unfamiliar among nurses in Sweden, but the concepts of holistic care and healing have been taught for a long time and are well integrated in education and legislation. This chapter discusses possible barriers, such as the level of decision-making in Swedish healthcare as well as the role and attitude towards legislation in the light of the dominant biomedical paradigm. Further discussion explores how integrative nursing may serve as a bridge between the caring, nursing, and biomedical perspectives in its effort to identify and construct evidence from the basis and understanding of complex interventions and complex systems science. Practical steps for progression are identified and suggested.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York: Oxford University Press, 2019 Edition: 2
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-35882 (URN)978-0-19-085104-0 (ISBN)
Available from: 2019-03-27 Created: 2019-03-27 Last updated: 2019-08-20Bibliographically approved
Jong, M. C., Lown, A., Schats, W., Otto, H. R. & Jong, M. (2019). Mapping the concept, content and outcome of wilderness therapy for childhood cancer survivors: protocol for a scoping review. BMJ Open, 9(8), Article ID e030544.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mapping the concept, content and outcome of wilderness therapy for childhood cancer survivors: protocol for a scoping review
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2019 (English)In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 9, no 8, article id e030544Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction: Long-term childhood cancer survivors are at risk for frailty and have significant health-related issues in adulthood. Various health promotion interventions have been proposed to enhance quality of life including wilderness therapy, which applies the impact of nature on health in a therapeutic context. Previous studies have described positive outcomes linked with various wilderness-related therapies for cancer survivors. However, there is no clarity on the role these therapies play in childhood cancer. The current scoping review aims to systematically map the concept, content and outcome of wilderness therapy for childhood cancer survivors.

Methods and analysis: This review will be guided by the Joanna Briggs Institute Reviewers’ manual for scoping reviews. A systematic literature search using medical subject headings (MeSH) and text words related to wilderness therapy and childhood cancer survivors will be performed in EMBASE, ERIC, Medline, Psycinfo, CINAHL, Scopus, Web of Science, SPORTDiscus and Svemed+, Sociological Abstracts, supplemented by grey literature searches. Eligible quantitative and qualitative studies will be screened, included, assessed for quality and extracted for data by two reviewers independently. Results will be described in a narrative style, reported in extraction tables and diagrams, and where appropriate in themes and text.

Ethics and dissemination: This study describes a protocol for a scoping review that will undertake secondary analysis of data already published in literature and is therefore exempt from medical ethical review. The scoping review will inform understanding of the benefits and risks of wilderness therapy for childhood cancer survivors, their families, practitioners, clinicians and researchers, and will help elucidate the steps necessary for building its evidence base going forward. Results will be published in a peer-reviewed scientific journal.

National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-37096 (URN)10.1136/bmjopen-2019-030544 (DOI)31481374 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85071740235 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-09-04 Created: 2019-09-04 Last updated: 2019-09-24Bibliographically approved
Backman Lönn, B., Olofsson, N. & Jong, M. (2019). Translation and validation of the Clinical Trial Nursing Questionnaire in Swedish: A first step to clarify the clinical research nurse role in Sweden. Journal of Clinical Nursing, 28(13-14), 2696-2705
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Translation and validation of the Clinical Trial Nursing Questionnaire in Swedish: A first step to clarify the clinical research nurse role in Sweden
2019 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 28, no 13-14, p. 2696-2705Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim and objectives: To translate the Clinical Trial Nursing Questionnaire (CTNQ) into Swedish and test it for face and content validity as well as internal consistency and reproducibility using test–retest procedures. Introduction/Background: In many countries, as in Sweden, a registered nurse can be involved in research by becoming a clinical research nurse. The clinical research nurse plays a pivotal role in clinical studies as a part of the research team. Scales have been developed and used with the objective to clarify the role of clinical research nurses: one of them is the CTNQ. Methods: A quantitative cross-sectional design with a test–retest procedure was applied to validate the translated questionnaire. By using a snowball sampling method, relevant participants were identified and 49 registered nurses working in the field of research as clinical research nurses answered the questionnaire on two occasions. An expert panel of three clinical research nurses evaluated the questionnaire for face and content validity. The STROBE checklist for observational research has been followed for presenting the research (see File S1). Results: Face and content validity was agreed upon in the expert panel group. Tests for internal consistency of the CTNQ was calculated and showed a high Cronbach's alpha for both the frequency and importance subscales. The test–retest correlation analysis (reproducibility) also revealed a high correlation coefficient for both subscales. Conclusion: The CTNQ-SWE is a valid and robust instrument in a Swedish version. The instrument can be of importance in assessing the role of clinical research nurses in Sweden in future studies. Relevance to clinical practice: Use of the CTNQ-SWE in future research can be of value for clarification and professional development of the clinical research nurse role in Sweden. The further use of the CTNQ in Sweden can be of value in understanding the process where licensed nurses make a transition into becoming a clinical research nurse, and to identify needs for customised education.

National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-36660 (URN)10.1111/jocn.14855 (DOI)30938002 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85065032770 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-07-08 Created: 2019-07-08 Last updated: 2019-07-08Bibliographically approved
van Vliet, M., Jong, M. C. & Jong, M. (2018). A Mind Body Skills Course Among Nursing and Medical Students: A Pathway for an Improved Perception of Self and the Surrounding World. Global Qualitative Nursing Research, 5
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A Mind Body Skills Course Among Nursing and Medical Students: A Pathway for an Improved Perception of Self and the Surrounding World
2018 (English)In: Global Qualitative Nursing Research, ISSN 2333-3936, Vol. 5Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Despite increased recognition of self-care and self-awareness as core competences for health care professionals, little attention is paid to these skills during their education. Evidence suggests that a Mind-Body (MB) skills course has the potential to enhance self-care and self-awareness among medical students. However, less is known about the meaning of this course for students and how it affects their personal and professional life. Therefore, we examined the lived experiences with an MB skills course among Dutch medical and Swedish nursing students. This course included various MB techniques, such as mindfulness meditation and guided imagery. Guided by a phenomenological hermeneutical method, three main themes were identified: "ability to be more present," "increased perception and awareness of self," and "connection on a deeper level with others." Overall, participation in the MB skills course served as a pathway to inner awareness and supported connecting with others as well as with the surrounding world.

Keywords
professional education, lived body, empathy, holistic care, resilience, self-care, stress, nurse–patient communication, doctor– patient communication, phenomenology
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-34910 (URN)10.1177/2333393618805340 (DOI)000447783900001 ()30349869 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85065005043 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-11-19 Created: 2018-11-19 Last updated: 2019-07-08Bibliographically approved
Valan, L., Sundin, K., Kristiansen, L. & Jong, M. (2018). Child health nurses’ experiences and opinions of parent Internet use. Early Child Development and Care, 188(12), 1736-1747
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Child health nurses’ experiences and opinions of parent Internet use
2018 (English)In: Early Child Development and Care, ISSN 0300-4430, E-ISSN 1476-8275, Vol. 188, no 12, p. 1736-1747Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

ABSTRACT Background: On the basis of parents? growing use of the Internet as a resource for health-related information, and the total lack of scientific literature about how nurses in child healthcare experience how their work is affected, further information is needed.Purpose: This study describes child health nurses? (CHN) experiences and opinions of parent Internet use.Design and methods: Using a qualitative descriptive approach, CHNs (n?=?20) working at Health Centres in northern Sweden were interviewed.Results: An overarching theme named ?Parents? use of Internet has influenced Nurses? work? was identified. The theme comprises three categories; ?Internet facilitating care, access, and provision?; ?The Internet complicating the professional role and performance?; and ?Sensing an imperative for a new role as a CHN.Conclusions: These findings add a fresh perspective to understanding the new and transformed professional role of CHNs.

National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-32184 (URN)10.1080/03004430.2017.1278697 (DOI)000447301100010 ()2-s2.0-85009829462 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-11-29 Created: 2017-11-29 Last updated: 2018-11-19Bibliographically approved
Valan, L., Kristiansen, L., Sundin, K. & Jong, M. (2018). Health-Related Internet Information Both Strengthens and Weakens Parents’ Potential for Self-Care: A Mixed-Methods Study on Parents’ Search Patterns. Open Journal of Nursing, 8(10), 731-745, Article ID 88148.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Health-Related Internet Information Both Strengthens and Weakens Parents’ Potential for Self-Care: A Mixed-Methods Study on Parents’ Search Patterns
2018 (English)In: Open Journal of Nursing, ISSN 2162-5336, E-ISSN 2162-5344, Vol. 8, no 10, p. 731-745, article id 88148Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Today’s parents belong to the digital generation and regularly use the Internet as a source of information. Parents’ quests for health-related online information comprise an effort to manage symptoms of illness or address questions about child development which may be an expression of self-management or self-care. Purpose: This study aims to describe health and child development related Internet search patterns used by parents of children ages zero to six, and further, how the obtained information was used in contacts with Child Health Care. Design and Methods: A two-step mixed- method approach is used in this study, comprising both a quantitative and a qualitative approach. First, a questionnaire was distributed to parents (n = 800) at 13 health centers in a medium sized county in Sweden. Second, one narrative interview with two parents total was conducted. Descriptive and non-parametric statistics were calculated, and qualitative manifest content analyses were performed. Results: A total of 687 completed the questionnaire, which corresponds to a response rate of 86%. The results show that 97% used the Internet for health-related and developmental child issues. The results show that parents often look at basic tips and the Internet is seen as a fast and accessible forum to obtain information. Parents often initiated their Internet searches using Google search for the specific subject, but the most common and most used website (used by 95% of parents), was the Swedish health site 1177.se. 98.4% of parents evaluated the general information searches they made on the Internet as reliable despite only 31% of the parents checking to see if the websites they used were scientifically based. Parents (81.7%) stated that they wanted their Child Health Nurses (CHN) to give them recommendations for valid websites. Conclusions: The results in this study show that, on the one hand, the Internet could strengthen parental knowledge (support self-care capacity), but, on the other hand, the found information could worry them and increase their anxiety—negatively affected self-care capacity. The parents suggested that the information should be double-checked to establish trust and develop self-care knowledge. Having a good resource to rely on, such as personal contact with a CHN, or using reliable websites seems to strengthen and reassure parents.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Scientific Research Publishing, 2018
Keywords
Health Literacy, Internet Advice, Mixed-Method, Parenting, Self-Care
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-35216 (URN)10.4236/ojn.2018.810055 (DOI)
Available from: 2018-12-14 Created: 2018-12-14 Last updated: 2018-12-14Bibliographically approved
Jong, M. C., Jong, M., van Wietmarschen, H. & Staps, S. (2018). Needs and strengths of citizens in Amsterdam regarding improving their health and living environment. Paper presented at 11th European Public Health Conference. Ljubljana, Slovenia, 28 November - 1 December, 2018. European Journal of Public Health, 28, 39-39
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Needs and strengths of citizens in Amsterdam regarding improving their health and living environment
2018 (English)In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 28, p. 39-39Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-36164 (URN)000461384200081 ()
Conference
11th European Public Health Conference. Ljubljana, Slovenia, 28 November - 1 December, 2018
Available from: 2019-05-20 Created: 2019-05-20 Last updated: 2019-05-20Bibliographically approved
Klein-Laansma, C. T., Jong, M., von Hagens, C., Jansen, J. P., van Wietmarschen, H. & Jong, M. C. (2018). Semi-Individualized Homeopathy Add-On Versus Usual Care Only for Premenstrual Disorders: A Randomized, Controlled Feasibility Study. Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine, 24(7), 684-693
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Semi-Individualized Homeopathy Add-On Versus Usual Care Only for Premenstrual Disorders: A Randomized, Controlled Feasibility Study
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2018 (English)In: Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine, ISSN 1075-5535, E-ISSN 1557-7708, Vol. 24, no 7, p. 684-693Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVES: Premenstrual syndrome and premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMS/PMDD) bother a substantial number of women. Homeopathy seems a promising treatment, but it needs investigation using reliable study designs. The feasibility of organizing an international randomized pragmatic trial on a homeopathic add-on treatment (usual care [UC] + HT) compared with UC alone was evaluated.

DESIGN: A multicenter, randomized, controlled pragmatic trial with parallel groups.

SETTINGS/LOCATION: The study was organized in general and private homeopathic practices in the Netherlands and Sweden and in an outpatient university clinic in Germany.

SUBJECTS: Women diagnosed as having PMS/PMDD, based on prospective daily rating by the daily record of severity of problems (DRSP) during a period of 2 months, were included and randomized.

INTERVENTIONS: Women were to receive UC + HT or UC for 4 months. Homeopathic medicine selection was according to a previously tested prognostic questionnaire and electronic algorithm. Usual care was as provided by the women's general practitioner according to their preferences.

OUTCOME MEASURES: Before and after treatment, the women completed diaries (DRSP), the measure yourself concerns and well-being, and other questionnaires. Intention-to-treat (ITT) and per protocol (PP) analyses were performed.

RESULTS: In Germany, the study could not proceed because of legal limitations. In Sweden, recruitment proved extremely difficult. In the Netherlands and Sweden, 60 women were randomized (UC + HT: 28; UC: 32), data of 47/46 women were analyzed (ITT/PP). After 4 months, relative mean change of DRSP scores in the UC + HT group was significantly better than in the UC group (p = 0.03).

CONCLUSIONS: With respect to recruitment and different legal status, it does not seem feasible to perform a larger, international, pragmatic randomized trial on (semi-)individualized homeopathy for PMS/PMDD. Since the added value of HT compared with UC was demonstrated by significant differences in symptom score changes, further studies are warranted.

Keywords
PMS/PMDD, homeopathy, pragmatic trials, premenstrual, randomized clinical trials
National Category
Other Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-33471 (URN)10.1089/acm.2017.0388 (DOI)000428034200001 ()29565636 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85050362520 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-04-11 Created: 2018-04-11 Last updated: 2019-03-22Bibliographically approved
Häggström, M., Rising Holmström, M. & Jong, M. (2017). Establishing Patient Safety in Intensive Care -A Grounded Theory.: Building Trust-Important for Patient Safety. Open Journal of Nursing, 07(10)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Establishing Patient Safety in Intensive Care -A Grounded Theory.: Building Trust-Important for Patient Safety
2017 (English)In: Open Journal of Nursing, ISSN 2162-5336, E-ISSN 2162-5344, Vol. 07, no 10Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: The modern intensive care unit (ICU) is a complex and high-risk environment, and even small adverse events and changes may deteriorate the patient’s conditions and eventually cause harm. Many factors can potentially be associated within an increased amount of errors, leading to adverse events. Nurses, nurse managers, and other leaders all play important roles in establishing patient safety. Aim: This study aimed to obtain a deeper understanding of leaders’ and nurses’ main concerns in establishing patient safety in Swedish intensive care units. Method: A grounded theory methodology was used. Data from 15 interviews with leaders and nurses involved in critical care in Sweden were collected, analysed and constant compared. Findings: The main concern in establishing patient safety was promoting quality of care, work engagement, and staffs well-being in strained ICUs. The core category building trust explained how the leaders’ and nurses’ strove for quality of care and wished a healthy, safe work environment. This is further explained in the categories “Being an accessible and able leader”, “Creating knowledge and understanding”, and “Establishing collaborative practice”. Conclusion: Establishing patient safety in the ICU requires that staffs enjoy going to work, have good work relations, are committed and want to stay at the unit. A healthy, salutogenetic unit with a work environment marked by trust provides a better opportunity to establish patient safety, and various leaders have potential to achieve this.

Keywords
Critical Care, Grounded Theory, Nursing Management, Patient Safety, Organisational Trust
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-32473 (URN)10.4236/ojn.2017.710084 (DOI)
Available from: 2017-12-15 Created: 2017-12-15 Last updated: 2017-12-22Bibliographically approved
Lundberg, K., Jong, M. C., Kristiansen, L. & Jong, M. (2017). Health Promotion in Practice—District Nurses׳ Experiences of Working with Health Promotion and Lifestyle Interventions Among Patients at Risk of Developing Cardiovascular Disease. Explore: The Journal of Science and Healing, 13(2), 108-115
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Health Promotion in Practice—District Nurses׳ Experiences of Working with Health Promotion and Lifestyle Interventions Among Patients at Risk of Developing Cardiovascular Disease
2017 (English)In: Explore: The Journal of Science and Healing, ISSN 1550-8307, E-ISSN 1878-7541, Vol. 13, no 2, p. 108-115Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective Health Promotion Practice (HPP) has the objective to promote a healthier lifestyle and reduce the risk of disease. The aim of this study was to examine district nurses׳ experiences of working with health preventive actions among patients with risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD), and to identify facilitators and obstacles in HPP. Design/Setting The study was carried out with a qualitative approach where individual semistructured interviews were performed with a total of 12 district nurses in primary care. Data transcripts were analyzed with a manifest content analysis. Findings Five categories were identified. Firstly, informants regarded HPP as the core essence of their work. Secondly, counseling and coaching were reported as crucial elements in working with HPP. Thirdly, informants identified tools such as motivational interviewing (MI) to facilitate HPP. In the fourth category facilitators and barriers of HPP appeared, consisting of both positive and negative attitudes and presence as well as lack of organizational culture and structure. Finally, some informants were dissatisfied with HPP and viewed it as compulsory or as a burden, while others were satisfied and experienced it as a stimulating challenge. Conclusion This study identified that HPP is the core of the district nurses׳ work to promote a healthier lifestyle in individuals with CVD. Organizational structures and culture need to be improved in order to support district nurses to successfully work with HPP. To optimize health promotion and strengthen patients׳ self-care, it is recommended that HPP include holistic elements of care.

Keywords
cardiovascular disease, counseling, health behavior, primary care, risk reduction behavior
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-31135 (URN)10.1016/j.explore.2016.12.001 (DOI)000402588400011 ()28094228 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85009788198 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-07-03 Created: 2017-07-03 Last updated: 2019-04-04Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-3907-2197

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