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Asplund, Kenneth
Publications (10 of 98) Show all publications
Kvamme, B. O., Asplund, K. & Bjerke, T. N. (2015). Drinking resumption: problematic alcohol use relapse after rehabilitation. A phenomenological hermeneutical perspective. Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, 29(4), 716-723
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Drinking resumption: problematic alcohol use relapse after rehabilitation. A phenomenological hermeneutical perspective
2015 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 29, no 4, p. 716-723Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The majority of patients being treated for alcohol abuse disorders experience one or more relapses after treatment. The fact that people use this inebriant in a way leading to so much harm and suffering might seem a conundrum. Therapists, family and others might find the person's relapse to be dramatic and upsetting, and one might question whether the person has the sufficient will or motivation to change. However, few previous studies have explored relapse from the patient's perspective. The aim of this study was to illuminate the patient's lived experience of relapse and to develop a deeper understanding of this phenomenon. The study consisted of qualitative interviews using a phenomenological hermeneutical approach. Three main themes emerged from the analyses: 'craving', 'self-image' and 'time'. The findings were discussed in the context of phenomenological literature. Cravings could occur unpredictably; nevertheless, craving was a common experience for the patients and signified a risk of relapse. Bodily experiences of craving were frequently mentioned, and alcohol addiction could be understood as to be a disease or a learned habit. Self-image was, at times, adversely affected by relapse episodes. Therefore, feelings of shame, self-respect and recognition were significant concepts. This study found that the perception of time as past, present and future greatly influenced the participants' experiences of relapse and rehabilitation. Thus, relapse was an upsetting and dramatic experience that could cause great discomfort and sometimes life-threatening situations. However, relapse could also be viewed as a planned event. This study highlights important truth and reality about alcoholism and relapse grounded in people's lived experience.

Keywords
addiction, alcohol, hermeneutics, lived experience, phenomenology, rehabilitation, relapse
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-27251 (URN)10.1111/scs.12202 (DOI)000368345900012 ()25851272 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84958933364 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-03-21 Created: 2016-03-17 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
Junehag, L., Asplund, K. & Svedlund, M. (2014). A qualitative study: Perceptions of the psychosocial consequences and access to support after an acute myocardial infarction. Intensive & Critical Care Nursing, 30(1), 22-30
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A qualitative study: Perceptions of the psychosocial consequences and access to support after an acute myocardial infarction
2014 (English)In: Intensive & Critical Care Nursing, ISSN 0964-3397, E-ISSN 1532-4036, Vol. 30, no 1, p. 22-30Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives: The aim of this study was to describe individuals' perceptions of the psychosocial consequences of an acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and of their access to support one year after the event. Methods: The study included 20 participants (14 men and six women) who lived in rural areas and had experienced their first AMI. Eleven were offered contact with a mentor. The participants were interviewed one year after their AMI. Results: The findings are presented in three themes: having a different life, having to manage the situation and having access to support, with 11 subthemes. During their recovery, the participants experienced psychosocial consequences, consisting of anxiety and the fear of being afflicted again. Most mentees appreciated their mentor and some of those without mentors wished they had received organised support. Participants were often more dissatisfied than satisfied with the follow-up provided during recovery. Conclusions: After an AMI, follow-up is important during recovery, but the standardised information provided is inadequate. During recovery, people need help dealing with existential crises. After discharge, receiving peer support from lay people with similar experiences could be valuable. The knowledge gleaned from this study could be used in education at coronary care units and in health care outside the hospital setting. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.

Keywords
Emotional distress, Existential crises, Mentor, Peer support, Qualitative content analysis
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Nursing Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-20993 (URN)10.1016/j.iccn.2013.07.002 (DOI)000349929400004 ()2-s2.0-84888428249 (Scopus ID)
Note

Source: Scopus

Available from: 2014-01-14 Created: 2014-01-09 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
Häggström, M., Asplund, K. & Kristiansen, L. (2014). Important quality aspects in transfer process. International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, 27(2), 123-139
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Important quality aspects in transfer process
2014 (English)In: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, ISSN 0952-6862, E-ISSN 1758-6542, Vol. 27, no 2, p. 123-139Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: Admission to and transfer from an intensive care unit affects not only the patient but also his or her relatives. The authors aimed to investigate relatives' perceptions of quality of care during a patient's transfer process from an intensive care unit to a general ward. Design/methodology/approach: The study had a mixed method design that included quantitative data and answers to open questions. The participants were 65 relatives of patients who received care in an ICU. They were recruited from two hospitals in Sweden. Findings: A majority perceived the transfer process as important, but analysis also showed that the participants rated it as an area for improvements. The relatives wanted participation, personal insight and control, respectful encounters, proximity, reassurance, continuous quality, reconnection and feedback. The relatives' participation in the transfer process was perceived as inadequate by 61 per cent, and the support that was received after the ICU discharge was perceived as inadequate by 53 per cent. The patients' length of stay in the ICU affected the relatives' perceptions of the quality of care. Overall, the relatives seemed to desire that the transfer process includes a continuous care, a competent staff, available information throughout the transfer process and personal involvement in the care, both before and after the transfer from the ICU. Research limitations/implications: The conclusion of this study is that relatives' needs and seeking for a well-planned ICU transitional process organisation with continuous quality before and after transfer, informational strategies that encourage the relatives to be involved and an organisation with competence throughout the healthcare chain are vital for quality. Practical implications: The conclusion of this study is that relatives' needs and seeking for a well-planned ICU transitional process organisation with continuous quality before and after transfer, informational strategies that encourage the relatives to be involved and an organisation with competence throughout the healthcare chain are vital for quality. Originality/value: The findings have important implications for nursing and nursing management. A relative's perception of the quality of care before and after transfer from ICU may be a valuable source to evaluate the ICU transitional care.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2014
Keywords
Critical care, intensive care, transfer process, transition, length-of-stay, relatives, quality in care
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-17097 (URN)10.1108/IJHCQA-09-2012-0090 (DOI)2-s2.0-84897031560 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2012-09-27 Created: 2012-09-27 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved
Junehag, L., Asplund, K. & Svedlund, M. (2014). Perceptions of illness, lifestyle and support after an acute myocardial infarction. Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, 28(2), 289-296
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Perceptions of illness, lifestyle and support after an acute myocardial infarction
2014 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 28, no 2, p. 289-296Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

After an acute myocardial infarction (AMI), people are encouraged to adopt a healthy lifestyle. But they are not always motivated to maintain the necessary lifestyle changes and need the right support to do it. In sparsely populated areas, people afflicted by an AMI have difficulty in finding standard rehabilitation programmes near their homes during the recovery, so they need alternative forms of support. The aim was to describe individual perceptions of their lifestyle and support, 1year after an AMI, with or without mentorship. This study has a qualitative, descriptive design with data collected in individual interviews. Twenty men and women were interviewed 1year after their first AMI, and 11 had been offered contact with mentors who had had an AMI. Content analysis was used to analyse the data. Those with and without mentors had similarities and tendencies to variation in their perceptions, with both a positive and negative view of life. The participants were aware of the necessity of living a healthy lifestyle but some resisted doing so. They wished to live as before, and all saw the future positively. Having a mentor with the same experience could be valuable for some people, but more research is needed to understand the lack of motivation to make beneficial lifestyle changes after a serious health event as AMI.

Keywords
rural areas, lifestyle changes, body limits, recovery, mentor, qualitative research
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-22004 (URN)10.1111/scs.12058 (DOI)000334503400010 ()2-s2.0-84898866468 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2014-06-04 Created: 2014-05-28 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
Carlsund, Å., Asplund, K., Sellström, E. & Eriksson, U. (2014). Swedish Parent’s Experiences of Joint Physical Custody. Open Family Studies Journal, 6, 1-7
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Swedish Parent’s Experiences of Joint Physical Custody
2014 (English)In: Open Family Studies Journal, ISSN 1874-9224, Vol. 6, p. 1-7Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Abstract: Aim: This study’s aim was to learn more about parent experiences, when living in joint physical custody with their children. Methods: The study design was descriptive, using a qualitative approach. Interviews were conducted with 28 parents who lived in joint physical custody with their children. Content was analysed using inductive content analysis. Results: Participants with joint custody reported many positive experiences, and a similar process of adapting to the new living- arrangement. Results indicate that shortly after the separation parents were mainly occupied with emotional reactions to the new family situation. After two to three years, or in some cases longer, things seemed to settle down and the participants became more accustomed to the arrangements. Conclusion: This qualitative study provides insights into parents’ experiences of living in joint physical custody with their children. Many positive experiences and a similar process of adapting to the new arrangement were revealed. In the initial period, the parents seemed mainly to have been occupied with emotional reactions to the new family situation.

Keywords
Content analysis, experiences, family, joint physical custody, parents, qualitative, well-being
National Category
Other Medical Sciences not elsewhere specified
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-35083 (URN)10.2174/1874922401406010001 (DOI)
Available from: 2018-12-06 Created: 2018-12-06 Last updated: 2018-12-06Bibliographically approved
Rising Holmström, M., Olofsson, N., Asplund, K. & Kristiansen, L. (2014). Transitions in the Swedish school system and the impact on student's positive self-reported-health. BMC Public Health, 14, Art. no. 1045
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Transitions in the Swedish school system and the impact on student's positive self-reported-health
2014 (English)In: BMC Public Health, ISSN 1471-2458, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 14, p. Art. no. 1045-Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: To explore three school based transitions and their impact on positive self-reported-health (SRH), pre-school to elementary school (6-10 y), elementary school to junior high school (10-13y), and junior high school to upper secondary school/high school (13-16y), in a long-term longitudinal population based study. Methods: The study followed three cohorts through one school transition each. A longitudinal study with data from 6693 Health Dialogue questionnaires were used. Data were collected in the middle of Sweden during 2007-2012 with school children age 6-16 years old. Results: Several significant factors were identified with an impact for a positive self-reported-health among children age 6-16y; not feeling sad or depressed, afraid or worried, positive school environment (schoolyard and restrooms), not bullied, good sleep, daily physical activity and ability to concentrate. There was no single factor identified, the factors differed according to gender and age. Conclusion: The study have identified several gender and age specific factors for successful school transitions relevant for a positive SRH. This is valuable information for school staff, parents and school children and provides a possibility to provide support and assistance when needed.

Keywords
Health dialogue, Health promotion, Longitudinal, School nurse
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-20117 (URN)10.1186/1471-2458-14-1045 (DOI)000343285600001 ()2-s2.0-84940566397 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2013-11-04 Created: 2013-11-04 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
Olsson, H., Strand, S., Asplund, K. & Kristiansen, L. (2014). Turning points and treatment readiness in forensic patients: A study based on staff experiences.. Nordisk sygeplejeforskning, 4(3), 175-188
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Turning points and treatment readiness in forensic patients: A study based on staff experiences.
2014 (English)In: Nordisk sygeplejeforskning, ISSN 1892-2678, E-ISSN 1892-2686, Vol. 4, no 3, p. 175-188Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Many individuals sentenced to forensic psychiatric care fail in the rehabilitation process, resulting in long-term inpatient hospital care. The concepts of turning points and treatment readiness in forensic settings should therefore be afforded more attention. Much can be learned from the features that characterize trajectories of recovery and processes related to turning points. The aim of this study was to explore forensic nursing staff’s experiences of forensic psychiatric patients’ turning towards recovery. A qualitative content analysis was used to analyse interviews with 13 forensic psychiatric nursing staff. Analysis of the data revealed two main themes with implications for clinical practice: promoting a turning point and recognizing a turning point. In the first of these, the emphasis was on actions and conditions that must exist to promote a turning. In the second, the main experiences related to recognizing a turning point were stories about visible and perceptible changes in the patient. The experiences that stood out most distinctly were those of being able to wait out the patient, and having patience when there was a lack of progression. The composition of staff and patients contributed to whether or not the environment was perceived as salutary.

Keywords
Forensic Nursing, changing process, forensic psychiatric care, interviews, recovery
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-19785 (URN)
Available from: 2013-08-28 Created: 2013-08-28 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
Björkman Randström, K., Wengler, Y., Asplund, K. & Svedlund, M. (2014). Working with 'hands-off' support: a qualitative study of multidisciplinary teams' experiences of home rehabilitation for older people. International Journal of Older People Nursing, 9(1), 25-33
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Working with 'hands-off' support: a qualitative study of multidisciplinary teams' experiences of home rehabilitation for older people
2014 (English)In: International Journal of Older People Nursing, ISSN 1748-3735, E-ISSN 1748-3743, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 25-33Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background

There is a move towards the provision of rehabilitation for older people in their homes. It is essential to ensure that rehabilitation services promote independence of older people.

Aim

The aim of the study was to explore multidisciplinary teams' experiences of home rehabilitation for older people.

Methods

Five focus groups were conducted with multidisciplinary teams based in a municipality in Sweden, covering seven different professions. In total, 28 participants volunteered to participate in these interviews. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed according to content analysis.

Results

Two main categories, as well as four subcategories, emerged. The first main category, having a rehabilitative approach in everyday life, consisted of the subcategories: ‘giving ‘hands-off’ support’ and ‘being in a home environment’. The second main category, working across professional boundaries, consisted of the subcategories: ‘coordinating resources’ and ‘learning from each other’.

Conclusion

Common goals, communication skills and role understanding contributed to facilitating the teams' performances of rehabilitation. A potential benefit of home rehabilitation, because the older person is in a familiar environment, is to work a rehabilitative approach into each individual's activity in their everyday life in order to meet their specific needs. At an organisational level, there is a need for developing services to further support older people's psychosocial needs during rehabilitation.

Implications for practice

Team performance towards an individual's rehabilitation should come from an emerged whole and not only from the performance of a specific professional approach depending on the traditional role of each profession. A rehabilitative approach is based on ‘hands-off’ support in order to incorporate an individual's everyday activities as a part of their rehabilitation.

Keywords
Focus group, Home rehabilitation, Multidisciplinary team, Municipality, Older people
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-17698 (URN)10.1111/opn.12013 (DOI)2-s2.0-84894484062 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2012-12-12 Created: 2012-12-12 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved
Björkman Randström, K., Asplund, K., Svedlund, M. & Paulson, M. (2013). Activity and participation in home rehabilitation: Older people's and family members perspectives. Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, 45(2), 211-216
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Activity and participation in home rehabilitation: Older people's and family members perspectives
2013 (English)In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 45, no 2, p. 211-216Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: To explore the experiences of older people and their supporting family members in relation to home rehabilitation, with a focus on activity and participation. Methods: Qualitative interviews were carried out with 6 older people and 6 family members at 1 and 6 months after the older person’s discharge to their home. Qualitative content analysis of the data was carried out. The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health provides a guiding framework for rehabilitation. Results: Informants’ experiences of home rehabilitation contributed to the formation of 6 categories: (i) living with a frail body; (ii) striving for well-being in daily life; (iii) being close at hand; (iv) feeling dependent in daily life; (v) struggling to carry on; and (vi) striving to be at home. Conclusion: Older people’s goals were to return to daily routines and to perform meaningful activities without feeling dependent on other people. Family members’ participation was crucial. Psychosocial support and autonomy were essential for facilitating activity and participation. Healthcare professionals should consider each individual’s unique experiences along with the significance of being at home.

Keywords
rehabilitation, older people, family member, interviews, qualitative research
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-17697 (URN)10.2340/16501977-1085 (DOI)000315179700017 ()2-s2.0-84875984561 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2012-12-12 Created: 2012-12-12 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved
Eriksson, M., Asplund, K., Hochwälder, J. & Svedlund, M. (2013). Changes in hope and health-related quality of life in couples following acute myocardial infarction: A quantitative longitudinal study. Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, 27(2), 295-302
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Changes in hope and health-related quality of life in couples following acute myocardial infarction: A quantitative longitudinal study
2013 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 27, no 2, p. 295-302Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background:  Acute myocardial infarction (AMI) is a life-changing event that affects both the patient and the family and can have an influence on hope as well as HRQoL during the recovery period.

Aims:  To compare self-rated scores of hope and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) 1, 7, 13 and 25 months, after an AMI with regard to (i) differences across time, and (ii) differences between patients and their partners.

Design:  Explorative and longitudinal study.

Methods:  In this nonrandomized study, Short Form 36 Health Questionnaire (SF-36) and Herth Hope Index-Swedish (HHI-S) questionnaires were completed by thirteen post-AMI patients and their partners. Data were collected on four occasions.

Results:  In general, hope as well as HRQoL scores increased over time. A 2 (groups) × 4 (times) anova for mixed design showed significant changes in mental as well as in physical health over time but no significant effect of group on mental or physical health. Calculation of the minimum detectable change (MDC-index) for HHI-S and SF-36 revealed that scores between data collection points were not stable.

Conclusion:  Our results show that although hope and HRQoL scores increased, only a few of the changes were statistically significant. Neither HHI-S nor SF-36 seems to measure stable states. Changes in hope and HRQoL levels may be due to participants striving to adapt to the current situation.

Relevance to clinical practice:  These results can be used in the training of nursing staff to enhance their understanding of the significance of a family-centred approach after an AMI.

Keywords
Acute myocardial infarction, Health Related Quality of Life, Hope, Minimum Detectable Change, Nursing
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-12057 (URN)10.1111/j.1471-6712.2012.01032.x (DOI)000318815700012 ()2-s2.0-84877831127 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2010-09-29 Created: 2010-09-29 Last updated: 2017-12-12Bibliographically approved
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