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Publications (10 of 10) Show all publications
Walker, T. & Allan, R. (2018). Bridging the gap between university and upper secondary school English studies: The ULE project. ICAME Journal/International Computer Archive of Modern English, 42(1), 191-212
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Bridging the gap between university and upper secondary school English studies: The ULE project
2018 (English)In: ICAME Journal/International Computer Archive of Modern English, ISSN 0801-5775, E-ISSN 1502-5462, Vol. 42, no 1, p. 191-212Article in journal (Refereed) Published
National Category
Specific Languages
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-33492 (URN)10.1515/icame-2018-0009 (DOI)
Available from: 2018-04-13 Created: 2018-04-13 Last updated: 2018-04-13
Allan, R. (2017). From Do You Know to I Don’t Know: An Analysis of the Frequency and Usefulness of Lexical Bundles in Five English Language Self-Study Books. Corpus Pragmatics, 1(4), 351-372
Open this publication in new window or tab >>From Do You Know to I Don’t Know: An Analysis of the Frequency and Usefulness of Lexical Bundles in Five English Language Self-Study Books
2017 (English)In: Corpus Pragmatics, ISSN 2509-9507, Vol. 1, no 4, p. 351-372Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Knowing which phrases to use in everyday situations is a key part of communicating effectively in English, and increasingly language learning materials are expected to reflect this. This paper presents a corpus analysis of five contemporary self-study books for English language learners, to identify common phrases taught, assess their form and function, and evaluate them against a baseline of lexical bundles (i.e. recurring sequences of words) used in social situations by users of English as a Lingua Franca (ELF). Self-study textbooks aim to equip the learner with enough English to function appropriately in a range of different contexts; they usually present language in the form of dialogues in common everyday situations, often supplemented with exercises, grammar explanations and glossaries. While they may differ in pedagogical approach, it could be anticipated that the lexical bundles found would be broadly similar. However, analysis of this corpus showed a lack of consistency both in the form and number of bundles found in the different publications. Furthermore, comparison with a corpus of ELF conversations extracted from the Vienna-Oxford International Corpus of English (VOICE, version 2.0 XML) (2013) highlighted the underrepresentation of lexical bundles with certain pragmatic functions, such as hedges/stance expressions (I don’t know, I think) and vague language (a little bit).

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2017
Keyword
Self-study books Lexical bundles English as a Lingua Franca Corpus analysis Language acquisition
National Category
Humanities and the Arts
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-32493 (URN)10.1007/s41701-017-0016-9 (DOI)
Available from: 2017-12-18 Created: 2017-12-18 Last updated: 2018-03-26Bibliographically approved
Allan, R. (2016). Lexical bundles from one century to the next: An analysis of language input in English teaching texts. In: : . Paper presented at IVACS 2016, Bath Spa University, June 16-17, 2016.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Lexical bundles from one century to the next: An analysis of language input in English teaching texts
2016 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Other academic)
National Category
Humanities
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-29497 (URN)
Conference
IVACS 2016, Bath Spa University, June 16-17, 2016
Available from: 2016-12-09 Created: 2016-12-09 Last updated: 2016-12-12Bibliographically approved
Allan, R. (2016). Lexical Bundles in ELF Business Meetings. The Linguistics Journal, 10(1), 141-163
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Lexical Bundles in ELF Business Meetings
2016 (English)In: The Linguistics Journal, ISSN 1718-2301, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 141-163Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

It is widely accepted that lexical bundles can provide useful insights into the characteristics of different types of discourse. However, studies have tended to focus on native speaker or language learner use, and English as a Lingua Franca (ELF), English used as a common means of communication among speakers from different first-language backgrounds, has received limited attention in this respect. Given that ELF is widely used in a business context, the research reported in this paper is an initial attempt to characterize ELF used in one business community of practice by identifying the frequency and function of lexical bundles in a small corpus of ELF business meetings. It draws on a subcorpus of business meeting transcripts from the Vienna-Oxford Corpus of English (VOICE) to identify the most frequent two-, three- and four-word bundles used, and compares these to lexical bundles used in ELF in other domains and in ENL business meetings (Handford, 2010). Results showed similar levels of use of frequent bundles in ELF business meetings to the comparative data, and a high degree of overlap. Many of the bundles used in ELF business meetings were the same as those used in general contexts, suggesting that there are there are stable core features in spoken ELF, although key bundles indicated certain differences. Furthermore, a number of the ELF business bundles corresponded to frequent ENL bundles. Many of the bundles used in ELF business meetings were associated with developing relationships, such as providing verbal feedback (yeah yeah yeah, mhm mhm mhm) hedging (I don’t know, I think that), and making interpersonal references (you know, you can see), and vague expressions (more or less, and so on) were also common. Idiomatic expressions tended to be avoided, with the exception of at the end of (the day) which had a high frequency in ELF, as in ENL business meetings.

National Category
Humanities
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-27398 (URN)
Available from: 2016-04-13 Created: 2016-04-13 Last updated: 2016-12-20Bibliographically approved
Allan, R. (2016). Lexical bundles in English language teaching texts: A century of change?. In: : . Paper presented at Celebrating the 10th Anniversary of A Corpus of English Dialogues 1560–1760: Research on Historical Corpora of Speech-related Texts,21-22 April 2016, Sundsvall, Sweden.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Lexical bundles in English language teaching texts: A century of change?
2016 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Other academic)
National Category
Humanities
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-29498 (URN)
Conference
Celebrating the 10th Anniversary of A Corpus of English Dialogues 1560–1760: Research on Historical Corpora of Speech-related Texts,21-22 April 2016, Sundsvall, Sweden
Available from: 2016-12-09 Created: 2016-12-09 Last updated: 2016-12-20Bibliographically approved
Allan, R. (2016). Lexical bundles in graded readers: To what extent does language restriction affect lexical patterning?. System An International Journal of Educational Technology and Applied Linguistics, 59, 61-72
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Lexical bundles in graded readers: To what extent does language restriction affect lexical patterning?
2016 (English)In: System An International Journal of Educational Technology and Applied Linguistics, ISSN 0346-251X, Vol. 59, p. 61-72Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study examines how far the lexical bundles that occur in graded readers are influenced by simplified language, comparing them quantitatively and qualitatively with those occurring in a corpus of authentic prose fiction. Phrasal language found in the graded readers is also evaluated using Martinez and Schmitt’s (2012) PHRASE list. The results are largely encouraging, showing that lexical bundles occur with greater density in graded readers than authentic fiction, that they largely reflect authentic language use, and that most of the phrases deemed to be important and useful are represented. However, differences between B1 and B2 level readers indicate that a higher degree of simplification affects both the range and grammatical type of lexical bundles. Non-transparent lexical bundles, despite being composed of very frequent words, were under-represented in the readers, particularly at B1 level. It is concluded that while graded readers are a valuable source of exposure to lexical bundles, the under-representation of frequently-used opaque phrases points to the need for a more systematic approach to their inclusion.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2016
Keyword
Graded readers, lexical bundles, English language learning
National Category
Humanities
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-27399 (URN)10.1016/j.system.2016.04.005 (DOI)000378673300005 ()2-s2.0-84964326005 (Scopus ID)
External cooperation:
Available from: 2016-04-13 Created: 2016-04-13 Last updated: 2016-09-06Bibliographically approved
Allan, R. (2014). Lexical Chunks in Business English as a Lingua Franca. In: : . Paper presented at I7th Biennial IVACS Conference, Newcastle, 19-21 June 2014.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Lexical Chunks in Business English as a Lingua Franca
2014 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Other academic)
National Category
General Language Studies and Linguistics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-22957 (URN)
Conference
I7th Biennial IVACS Conference, Newcastle, 19-21 June 2014
Available from: 2014-09-12 Created: 2014-09-12 Last updated: 2018-01-11Bibliographically approved
Allan, R. (2013). At the end of the day… An ELF perspective on lexical chunks in spoken business English.. In: : . Paper presented at iLinC 2013; Interdisciplinary Linguistics Conference Evolving perspective; Queens University, Belfast, UK; 2nd Nov 2013..
Open this publication in new window or tab >>At the end of the day… An ELF perspective on lexical chunks in spoken business English.
2013 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Since Sinclair (1991) identified “the idiom principle”, lexical chunks, i.e. frequently occurring clusters of words, have been recognized as an important part of language learning. This importance has been highlighted as advances in computer software have made it easier to identify patterns in language use, and most published English teaching materials are now informed by the analysis of large corpora of native speaker language. However, given that the most widespread use of English language throughout the world takes the form of English as a Lingua Franca (ELF), i.e. English used as a common means of communication among speakers from different first-language backgrounds, there is a strong argument for examining the lexical chunks used in this context when considering students’ needs.

 

This study uses VOICE (the Vienna-Oxford International Corpus of English), a corpus of spoken ELF interactions, to examine the occurrence of language chunks in ELF in the professional domain. A subcorpus of VOICE comprising of occurring in the professional domain (business, organizational and research contexts) was created, representing approximately 830,000 tokens of transcribed oral text. Recurring lexical chunks were identified using Wordsmith Tools (Scott 2012), and categorized according to type and function. The types of lexical chunk occurring most frequently proved to be vague expressions, e.g. “and so on” and discourse markers such as “at the end of the day”. The pedagogical implications of these findings are considered, concerning whether and how published materials might be supplemented to better meet the needs of those students who expect to use English in an ELF context. 

Keyword
English as a lingua franca, corpus linguistics, lexical chunks
National Category
Humanities
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-21029 (URN)
Conference
iLinC 2013; Interdisciplinary Linguistics Conference Evolving perspective; Queens University, Belfast, UK; 2nd Nov 2013.
Available from: 2014-01-13 Created: 2014-01-13 Last updated: 2015-06-18Bibliographically approved
Allan, R. (2010). Concordances versus dictionaries: Evaluating approaches to word learning in ESOL. In: R. Chacón-Beltrán, C. Abello-Contesse, M. Mar Torreblanca-López & M. Dolores López-Jiménez (Ed.), Insights into non-native vocabulary teaching and learning: (pp. 112-126). Clevedon: Multilingual Matters
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Concordances versus dictionaries: Evaluating approaches to word learning in ESOL
2010 (English)In: Insights into non-native vocabulary teaching and learning / [ed] R. Chacón-Beltrán, C. Abello-Contesse, M. Mar Torreblanca-López & M. Dolores López-Jiménez, Clevedon: Multilingual Matters, 2010, p. 112-126Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Clevedon: Multilingual Matters, 2010
Keyword
Concordances, vocabulary, English language learning
National Category
Humanities
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-27397 (URN)9781847692894 (ISBN)
Available from: 2016-04-13 Created: 2016-04-13 Last updated: 2017-05-18Bibliographically approved
Rachel, A. (2009). Can a graded corpus provide 'authentic' input?. ELT Journal, 63(1), 23-32
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Can a graded corpus provide 'authentic' input?
2009 (English)In: ELT Journal, ISSN 0951-0893, E-ISSN 1477-4526, Vol. 63, no 1, p. 23-32Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In addition to their intended purpose, graded reader texts can be made into a corpus appropriate for use with lower-level learners. Here I consider using such a corpus for data-driven learning (DDL), to make this approach more accessible to intermediate level students. However, how far does grading the corpus in this way compromise the authenticity of the language learners are exposed to? The simplified nature of such corpora may limit learners' exposure to lexical chunks, which are fundamental to the acquisition of natural and fluent language. This paper compares lexical chunks in graded corpora and the British National Corpus, examining frequency, type, and composition, to evaluate the ‘authenticity’ of graded input. Despite some differences, it is argued that the scale and type of lexical chunks are sufficient to provide input that reflects authentic language, suggesting that graded readers may offer an acceptable balance of accessibility and authenticity.

Keyword
English language learning, graded readers.
National Category
Humanities
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-27396 (URN)10.1093/elt/ccn011 (DOI)
Available from: 2016-04-13 Created: 2016-04-13 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-7968-297X

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