miun.sePublications
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Jönsson, Jessica H.
Publications (10 of 38) Show all publications
Jönsson, J. H. (2018). A weakening welfare state and the changing professional identities of social workers in Sweden. In: 8th European Conference for Social Work Research Book of Abstracts: . Paper presented at 8th European Conference for Social Work Research, Edinburgh, Scotland, 18-20 April, 2018. Edinburgh
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A weakening welfare state and the changing professional identities of social workers in Sweden
2018 (English)In: 8th European Conference for Social Work Research Book of Abstracts, Edinburgh, 2018Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Social workers have historically been an integral part of a well-developed welfare state in Sweden. However, the traditional ‘solidary role’ of social workers has rapidly altered due to the neoliberal changes, which has weakened the social support system. This has created ‘identity crisis’ for many social workers who still perceive themselves as promoters of ‘welfare of the people’. This study explores the neoliberal transformations and the changing professional identity of municipal social workers and their experiences of, and responses to, the neoliberal reorganisation of public social work in Sweden. The following questions have guided the study: How has the recent political, social and organisational transformations influenced the daily work of social workers? How such changes have influenced the relationship and trust between social workers and service users? How such neoliberal transformations have influenced social workers professional identity? How do social workers respond to neoliberal changes in and limitations to their professional activities? The contribution is based on interviews with 15 social workers working in different municipalities in Sweden, during 2016-17. The interviewed social workers were engaged in different areas of public municipal social work, such as in the areas of child and family welfare, homelessness, mental health problems and substance abuse and social work with asylum-seekers. The results have been analysed in the frame of critical social theory. The study shows that meanwhile some social workers are resisting the neoliberal managerialism, which influence their sense of pride in their professional identities by finding new creative and progressive ways of working with people in need, others are uncritically adjusting themselves to evolving forms of neoliberal managerialism. It is concluded that the new neoliberal political and organisational landscape of professional social work in Sweden and the retreat of the welfare state from its traditional duties and, thereby, the reduction of social workers possibilities to work directly with service users, make the struggle for revitalisation of rights-based welfare state and solidary social work more urgent than ever.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Edinburgh: , 2018
National Category
Social Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-33555 (URN)978-1-9999205-7-9 (ISBN)
Conference
8th European Conference for Social Work Research, Edinburgh, Scotland, 18-20 April, 2018
Available from: 2018-05-03 Created: 2018-05-03 Last updated: 2018-05-03Bibliographically approved
Jönsson, J. H. & Flem, A. L. (2018). International field training in social work education: beyond colonial divides. Social Work Education, 37(7), 895-908
Open this publication in new window or tab >>International field training in social work education: beyond colonial divides
2018 (English)In: Social Work Education, ISSN 0261-5479, E-ISSN 1470-1227, Vol. 37, no 7, p. 895-908Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper examines the influence of and need for a critical and global-oriented social work education on students’ learning and developments in the context of international field training. The study uses mixed methods strategy of web survey, focus groups and document review of field reports. Participants in the study are social work students from social work programs in Norway and Sweden who have conducted their international field training in the Global South. The results of the study show that in order to obtain a critical and postcolonial understanding of global inequalities and the role of social work, students need to be truly prepared for international field training by critical and postcolonial knowledge, which will challenge many students’ West-centric perspectives and facilitate them by a self-reflective positioning throughout their field training. The imagination of traveling to and ‘learning about the others’ should be then replaced by a move beyond ‘us-and-them’ divides in line with the ethical principles and values of social work.

Keywords
Field training, postcolonialism, social work education, social work ethics, West-centrism
National Category
Social Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-33554 (URN)10.1080/02615479.2018.1461823 (DOI)000442731400006 ()
Available from: 2018-05-03 Created: 2018-05-03 Last updated: 2018-09-26Bibliographically approved
Kamali, M. & Jönsson, J. H. (2018). Kulturkompetens och antirasistiskt socialt arbete. In: Magnus Dahlstedt & Philip Lalander (Ed.), Manifest: för ett socialt arbete i tiden (pp. 279-289). Lund: Studentlitteratur AB
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Kulturkompetens och antirasistiskt socialt arbete
2018 (Swedish)In: Manifest: för ett socialt arbete i tiden / [ed] Magnus Dahlstedt & Philip Lalander, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2018, p. 279-289Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2018
National Category
Social Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-33761 (URN)9789144125688 (ISBN)
Available from: 2018-06-13 Created: 2018-06-13 Last updated: 2018-06-13Bibliographically approved
Kamali, M. & Jönsson, J. H. (Eds.). (2018). Neoliberalism, Nordic Welfare States and Social Work: Current and Future Challenges. New York: Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Neoliberalism, Nordic Welfare States and Social Work: Current and Future Challenges
2018 (English)Collection (editor) (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York: Routledge, 2018. p. 272
Series
Routledge Advances in Social Work
National Category
Social Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-33556 (URN)978-1-138-08430-8 (ISBN)9781315111834 (ISBN)
Available from: 2018-05-03 Created: 2018-05-03 Last updated: 2018-05-03Bibliographically approved
Jönsson, J. H. (2018). Servants of a 'sinking Titanic' or actors of change?: contested identities of social workers in Sweden. European Journal of Social Work
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Servants of a 'sinking Titanic' or actors of change?: contested identities of social workers in Sweden
2018 (English)In: European Journal of Social Work, ISSN 1369-1457, E-ISSN 1468-2664Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Historically, social workers have been an integral part of a well-developed welfare state in Sweden. However, due to the neoliberal changes, which have seen the weakening of the support system for vulnerable groups and individuals, the traditional ‘solidary role’ of social workers has rapidly altered. This has created uncertainty and dilemmas for the identification of many social workers, who still perceive themselves as promoters of ‘welfare of the people’. This article dwells, therefore, on neoliberal transformations and the changing professional identity of practitioners. The study is based on a comprehensive empirical work of interviews with social workers. The results show a growing and widespread unease with new professional roles and functions of social workers as bureaucrats within a neoliberalised organisation of public social work. Some social workers still try to find creative and new ways of working in solidarity, while others, although critical, see adjustment to the new organisational frames as a way to continue their work. It is argued that social workers are not passive actors in the process of neoliberalisation of public social work in Sweden but could actively take different stances and choose their own identifications, in order to maintain the solidary role of social workers.

Abstract [sv]

Historiskt sett har svenska socialarbetare varit en integrerad del av en välutvecklad välfärdsstat. Men på grund av de nyliberala förändringar som har inneburit en försvagning av välfärdsstaten och dess stödsystem för utsatta grupper och individer, har socialarbetares traditionella ‘solidariska roll’ snabbt förändrats. Detta har skapat rollkonflikter och flera dilemman för många socialarbetare som fortfarande uppfattar och identifierar sig som en profession som främjar välfärd och solidaritet. Föreliggande artikel ämnar att undersöka hur de senaste decenniernas nyliberala förändringar har påverkat socialarbetares professionella identitet i Sverige. Studien bygger på ett omfattande empiriskt material bestående av intervjuer med socialarbetare verksamma inom den kommunala sektorn. Studiens resultat visar på en växande och utbredd oro hos socialarbetare för deras nya professionella roller och funktioner som byråkrater i en nyliberaliserad organisation i offentligt socialt arbete snarare än välfärdsagenter. Resultatet visar också att socialarbetarna reagerar på olika sätt mot sina nya nyliberala professionella roller och funktioner. En del försöker hitta kreativa och nya sätt att arbeta i solidaritet, medans andra, kritiska attityder tilltrots, ser en anpassning till nya organisatoriska ramar som ett sätt att fortsätta sitt jobb. Artikelförfattaren menar att socialarbetare inte behöver vara passiva aktörer i nyliberaliseringsprocessen av det offentliga socialt arbetet i Sverige, utan kan vara aktiva aktörer i att motverka nyliberala förändringarna inom professionen och inta solidariska arbetssätt och identiteter.

Keywords
Neoliberalism, professional identity, social work, symbolic violence, Sweden, Nyliberalism, professionell identitet, socialt arbete, symboliskt våld, Sverige
National Category
Social Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-34324 (URN)10.1080/13691457.2018.1529659 (DOI)
Available from: 2018-09-03 Created: 2018-09-03 Last updated: 2018-10-12Bibliographically approved
Jönsson, J. H. (2018). Sustainable development and the global role of social work: Discontents and new horizons. In: : . Paper presented at Joint World Conference on Social Work, Education and Social Development 2018, Dublin, Ireland, 4-7 July 2018.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sustainable development and the global role of social work: Discontents and new horizons
2018 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
National Category
Social Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-34326 (URN)
Conference
Joint World Conference on Social Work, Education and Social Development 2018, Dublin, Ireland, 4-7 July 2018
Available from: 2018-09-03 Created: 2018-09-03 Last updated: 2018-09-20Bibliographically approved
Jönsson, J. H. (2018). Välfärdsstatens försvagning, ökade sociala problem och social mobilisering. In: Stefan Sjöberg och Päivi Turunen (Ed.), Samhällsarbete: Aktörer, arenor och perspektiv (pp. 237-250). Lund: Studentlitteratur AB
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Välfärdsstatens försvagning, ökade sociala problem och social mobilisering
2018 (Swedish)In: Samhällsarbete: Aktörer, arenor och perspektiv / [ed] Stefan Sjöberg och Päivi Turunen, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2018, p. 237-250Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2018
National Category
Social Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-33762 (URN)9789144111759 (ISBN)
Available from: 2018-06-13 Created: 2018-06-13 Last updated: 2018-06-13Bibliographically approved
Jönsson, J. H. & Ghazanfareeon Karlsson, S. (2017). Marginalization and social work in a changing society: Older refugees and social work. In: : . Paper presented at IFSW European Conference 2017 – Marginalization and Social Work in a Changing Society, 28-30 May, 2017, Reykjavik, Island.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Marginalization and social work in a changing society: Older refugees and social work
2017 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The recent “refugee crisis” is due to global inequalities, wars and conflicts, political and social instabilities which have led to deterioration in the living conditions of many people in non-Western countries; resulting in displacement of millions of people on a global scale. A “substantial number” of people who flee to European countries are older refugees who loose their social networks in times of crises and large-scale emmigration. Given the lack of job opportunities for older people they become socioeconomically and culturally marginalised in the host countries. Older refugees and their living conditions have been overlooked in global social problems such as forced migration and rarely addressed by social work programs or professionals, although social workers play a key role in in supporting the rapidly ageing world. This presentation critically examines the hindrances and opportunities for the inclusion of older persons in the host society. The preliminary results of the study show the structural hindrances such as the pension system and the advanced labour market but also possibilities of receiving a relatively good health care and public economic support. It is argued that social work should actively be engaged in structural reforms to improve the living conditions of older refugees.

National Category
Social Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-31394 (URN)
Conference
IFSW European Conference 2017 – Marginalization and Social Work in a Changing Society, 28-30 May, 2017, Reykjavik, Island
Available from: 2017-08-14 Created: 2017-08-14 Last updated: 2017-08-24Bibliographically approved
Flem, A. L., Jönsson, J. H., Alseth, A. K., Strauss, H. & Antczak, H. (2017). Revitalizing social work education through global and critical awareness: Examples from three Scandinavian schools of social work. European Journal of Social Work, 20(1), 76-87
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Revitalizing social work education through global and critical awareness: Examples from three Scandinavian schools of social work
Show others...
2017 (English)In: European Journal of Social Work, ISSN 1369-1457, E-ISSN 1468-2664, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 76-87Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Increasing globalisation, reorganisation of the Scandinavian welfare regimes and the awareness of increasing global roots of local social problems necessitated change in the curriculum of social work in three Scandinavian schools of social work in Denmark, Norway and Sweden. Recent global transformations, increasing global inequalities, increasing forced migration and the emergence of glocal social problems make the traditional education and methods of social work ineffective and in some cases harmful for people in need of social work intervention. This article examines the need to provide critical, global and multilevel perspectives in social work education in order to prepare social work students for the increasing social problems with global roots. The article, which is based on cross-national collaborations in social work education between three Scandinavian countries, addresses global and critical components in theoretical courses, professional training and field practice in the social work education of the countries in question. It is argued that social work education should move beyond the old division of classical and international/intercultural toward including global and critical perspectives in an integrative manner in all programs.

Keywords
Critical consciousness, glocal social problems, intersectionalism, Scandinavian welfare state, social work curriculum, kritisk bevissthet, glokale sosiale problem, interseksjonalitet, Skandinaviske velferdsstater, sosialarbeiderutdanning, kritiskt medvetande, glokala sociala problem, intersektionalitet, Skandinaviska valfardsstater, socialarbetarutbildning, kritisk bevidsthed, sociale problemer i et "glocal' perspektiv, intersektionistiske perspektiver, skandinavisk velfaerdsstat, socialradgiveruddannelse
National Category
Social Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-27773 (URN)10.1080/13691457.2016.1185703 (DOI)000394053200008 ()2-s2.0-84969961355 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-05-27 Created: 2016-05-27 Last updated: 2017-08-18Bibliographically approved
Jönsson, J. H. & Heggem Kojan, B. (2017). Social Justice Beyond Neoliberal Welfare Nationalism: Challenges of increasing immigration to Sweden and Norway. Critical and radical social work An international journal, 5(3), 301-317
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Social Justice Beyond Neoliberal Welfare Nationalism: Challenges of increasing immigration to Sweden and Norway
2017 (English)In: Critical and radical social work An international journal, ISSN 2049-8608, E-ISSN 2049-8675, Vol. 5, no 3, p. 301-317Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article critically examines the socio-political responses of Sweden and Norway to the increasing of immigration and refugees in 2015/16. Based on a review of governmental and municipal authorities’ responses to the increasing immigration to the two countries, the results show that the increasing of immigration and refugees in a time of neoliberal reorganisation in society creates new conceptual, ethical and practical challenges for the practices of social work in the two countries. It is argued that the neoliberal privatisation of the reception of newcomers deteriorates the possibilities of social work to play its effective role in promoting social justice and social cohesion. Social work as a global and human rights profession should move beyond national boundaries and care nationalism in order to realise solidary goals and the international commitments of social work and social workers.

Keywords
Increasing Immigration, Neoliberalism, Social Justice, Social Work, Welfare State
National Category
Social Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-31395 (URN)10.1332/204986017X15029696492785 (DOI)000424474200004 ()
Available from: 2017-08-14 Created: 2017-08-14 Last updated: 2018-03-19Bibliographically approved
Organisations

Search in DiVA

Show all publications