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Edman, Mattias
Publications (10 of 32) Show all publications
Zhang, R., Carlsson, F., Edman, M., Hummelgård, M., Jonsson, B.-G., Bylund, D. & Olin, H. (2018). Escherichia coli Bacteria Develop Adaptive Resistance to Antibacterial ZnO Nanoparticles. Advanced Biosystem, 2(5), Article ID 1800019.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Escherichia coli Bacteria Develop Adaptive Resistance to Antibacterial ZnO Nanoparticles
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2018 (English)In: Advanced Biosystem, ISSN 2366-7478, Vol. 2, no 5, article id 1800019Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Antibacterial agents based on nanoparticles (NPs) have many important applications, e.g., for the textile industry, surface disinfection, wound dressing, water treatment, and food preservation. Because of their prevalent use it is important to understand whether bacteria could develop resistance to such antibacterial NPs similarly to the resistance that bacteria are known to develop to antibiotics. Here, it is reported that Escherichia coli(E. coli) develops adaptive resistance to antibacterial ZnO NPs after several days' exposure to the NPs. But, in contrast to antibiotics‐resistance, the observed resistance to ZnO NPs is not stable—after several days without exposure to the NPs, the bacteria regain their sensitivity to the NPs' antibacterial properties. Based on the analyses it is suggested that the observed resistance is caused by changes in the shape of the bacteria and the expressions of membrane proteins. The findings provide insights into the response of bacteria to antibacterial NPs, which is important to elucidate for designing and evaluating the risk of applications based on antibacterial NPs.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2018
National Category
Nano Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-34436 (URN)10.1002/adbi.201800019 (DOI)000446970000008 ()2-s2.0-85065053901 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-09-18 Created: 2018-09-18 Last updated: 2019-07-08Bibliographically approved
Venugopal, P., Junninen, K., Edman, M. & Kouki, J. (2017). Assemblage composition of fungal wood-decay species has major influence on how climate and wood quality modify decomposition. FEMS Microbiology Ecology, 93(3), Article ID fix002.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Assemblage composition of fungal wood-decay species has major influence on how climate and wood quality modify decomposition
2017 (English)In: FEMS Microbiology Ecology, ISSN 0168-6496, E-ISSN 1574-6941, Vol. 93, no 3, article id fix002Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The interactions among saprotrophic fungal species, as well as their interactions with environmental factors, may have a major influence on wood decay and carbon release in ecosystems. We studied the effects that decomposer diversity (species richness and assemblage composition) have on wood decomposition when the climatic variables and substrate quality vary simultaneously. We used two temperature (16 and 21°C) and two humidity (70% and 90%) levels at two wood qualities (wood from managed and old-growth forests) of Pinus sylvestris. In a nine-month experiment, the effects of fungal diversity were tested using four wood-decaying fungi (Antrodia xanthaDichomitus squalensFomitopsis pinicola and Gloeophyllum protractum) at assemblage levels one, two and four species. Wood quality and assemblage composition affected the influence of climatic factors on decomposition rates. Fungal assemblage composition was found to be more important than fungal species richness, indicating that species-specific fungal traits are of paramount importance in driving decomposition. We conclude that models containing fungal wood-decay species (and wood-based carbon) need to take into account species - and assemblage composition - specific properties to improve predictive capacity in regard to decomposition related carbon dynamics.

Keywords
climate change, fungal assemblage composition, fungal diversity, interaction, species specificity, species richness, wood decomposition, wood quality
National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-29947 (URN)10.1093/femsec/fix002 (DOI)000397434400008 ()2-s2.0-85028009717 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-01-26 Created: 2017-01-26 Last updated: 2017-11-29Bibliographically approved
Carlsson, F., Edman, M. & Jonsson, B.-G. (2017). Increased CO2 evolution caused by heat treatment in wood-decaying fungi. Mycological progress, 16(5), 513-519
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Increased CO2 evolution caused by heat treatment in wood-decaying fungi
2017 (English)In: Mycological progress, ISSN 1617-416X, E-ISSN 1861-8952, Vol. 16, no 5, p. 513-519Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Wood-decaying fungi are regarded as the main decomposers of woody debris in boreal forests. Given that fungal respiration makes a significant contribution to terrestrial carbon flows, it is important to understand how the wood-decaying fungal metabolism is regulated in relation to different environmental conditions and disturbances. In the present study, we investigated the effect of temperature stress on wood decomposition rate in 18 species of wood-decaying fungi, representing a broad range of species-habitat associations. Heat shock duration and temperature were calibrated to match the conditions of a forest fire. We found a general increase in fungal decay rate after heat shock; the response was more pronounced in species associated with fire-prone forests. The underlying mechanism is unclear, but possibly relates to an up-regulation at the cellular level in response to heat shock. Our results show that the decomposition rate of dead wood can be strongly affected by environmental triggers.

Keywords
Decomposition, Saproxylic fungi, CO2, Heat treatment, Wood decay, Carbon cycling
National Category
Biological Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-30835 (URN)10.1007/s11557-017-1281-5 (DOI)000399824400004 ()2-s2.0-85014052521 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-06-09 Created: 2017-06-09 Last updated: 2017-12-18Bibliographically approved
Venugopal, P., Junninen, K., Linnakoski, R., Edman, M. & Kouki, J. (2016). Climate and wood quality have decayer-specific effects on fungal wood decomposition. Forest Ecology and Management, 360, 341-351
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Climate and wood quality have decayer-specific effects on fungal wood decomposition
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2016 (English)In: Forest Ecology and Management, ISSN 0378-1127, E-ISSN 1872-7042, Vol. 360, p. 341-351Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Any process that affects wood decomposition and decomposers in boreal forests may also affect the role that dead wood has on global carbon storages. We investigated under controlled laboratory conditions the impact of three major variables – temperature, humidity and wood quality – on Scots pine wood decomposition by four different fungal species. To reveal these effects, we conducted a nine-month factorial experiment. Wood quality was found to have a much more pronounced effect on fungal wood decay than climate variables. Furthermore, the fast-grown pine wood from managed forests decayed much faster than centuries old ‘kelo’ pine trees from natural forests as well as the slow-grown wood from managed forests. We found an overall increase in decomposition with temperature and humidity in Gloeophyllum protractum, except that the decay rate of the fast-grown wood declined with increasing temperature at higher humidity levels. The overall decomposition rates varied greatly with decayer species and wood type, and several interactions between temperature, humidity and wood quality effects were documented. In particular, we found that the fast decayers, Dichomitus squalens and Fomitopsis pinicola did not show any response to climate variables, but responded to wood quality only. The slow decayers Antrodia xantha and G. protractum responded to wood quality and interaction effects of climate and wood quality. Our results demonstrated species-specific effects of climate and wood quality when tested simultaneously, and show that it is critical to understand the different and complex mechanisms that affect wood decomposition and, consequently, carbon storages in forests, in order to increase the reliability of the climate-carbon prediction models.

Keywords
Climate change; decomposer fungi; feedbacks; humidity; interaction; kelo; humidity; temperature; wood decomposition, wood quality
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-26302 (URN)10.1016/j.foreco.2015.10.023 (DOI)000367117400031 ()2-s2.0-84947706773 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2015-11-25 Created: 2015-11-25 Last updated: 2017-12-01Bibliographically approved
Edman, M. & Eriksson, A.-M. (2016). Competitive outcomes between wood-decaying fungi are altered in burnt wood. FEMS Microbiology Ecology, 92(6), 1-7
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Competitive outcomes between wood-decaying fungi are altered in burnt wood
2016 (English)In: FEMS Microbiology Ecology, ISSN 0168-6496, E-ISSN 1574-6941, Vol. 92, no 6, p. 1-7Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Fire is an important disturbance agent in boreal forests where it creates a wide variety of charred and other types of heat-modified dead wood substrates, yet how these substrates affect fungal community structure and development within wood is poorly understood. We allowed six species of wood-decaying basidiomycetes to compete in pairs in wood-discs that were experimentally burnt before fungal inoculation. The outcomes of interactions in burnt wood differed from those in unburnt control wood for two species:Antrodia sinuosanever lost on burnt wood and won over its competitor in 67% of the trials compared to 40% losses and 20% wins on unburnt wood. In contrast, Ischnoderma benzoinumwon all interactions on unburnt wood compared to 33% on burnt wood. However, the responses differed depending on the identity of the competing species, suggesting an interaction between competitor and substrate type. The observed shift in competitive balance between fungal species probably results from chemical changes in burnt wood, but the underlying mechanism needs further investigation. Nevertheless, the results indicate that forest fires indirectly structure fungal communities by modifying dead wood, and highlight the importance of fire-affected dead wood substrates in boreal forests.

Keywords
wood-decaying fungi, forest fire, competition, basidiomycetes, boreal, biodiversity
National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-27796 (URN)10.1093/femsec/fiw068 (DOI)000377473600003 ()2-s2.0-84973091525 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-06-03 Created: 2016-06-03 Last updated: 2017-08-09Bibliographically approved
Hedenström, E., Fagerlund-Edfeldt, A., Edman, M. & Jonsson, B.-G. (2016). Resveratrol, piceatannol, and isorhapontigenin from Norway spruce (Picea abies) debarking wastewater as inhibitors on the growth of nine species of wood-decaying fungi. Wood Science and Technology, 50(3), 617-629
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Resveratrol, piceatannol, and isorhapontigenin from Norway spruce (Picea abies) debarking wastewater as inhibitors on the growth of nine species of wood-decaying fungi
2016 (English)In: Wood Science and Technology, ISSN 0043-7719, E-ISSN 1432-5225, Vol. 50, no 3, p. 617-629Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The diethyl ether extract obtained from solvent-solvent extraction of Norway spruce (Picea abies) debarking water, a byproduct from debarking of logs in the pulp and paper industry, was tested for inhibition of growth on agar plates of nine species of wood-decaying fungi: Antrodia sinuosa, Antrodia xantha, Coniophora puteana, Fomitopsis pinicola, Gloeophyllum sepiarium, Heterobasidion parviporum, Phlebiopsis gigantea, Serpula himantioides, and Serpula lacrymans. One fraction of the extract showed excellent antifungal activity for a majority of the species, with complete inhibition of growth for A. sinuosa, A. xantha, and G. sepiarium. The major constituents of the most active fraction were identified as the hydroxystilbenes resveratrol, isorhapontigenin (synonymous with methyl piceatannol), and piceatannol (synonymous with astringenin). The active compounds were isolated or synthesized and used individually for dose-response studies. It was found that isorhapontigenin and piceatannol inhibited all growth of A. sinuosa, A. xantha, and G. sepiarium in 0.35 % weight concentration. The hydroxystilbenes were the three most abundant substances in the debarking water and can be obtained as a mixture or in enriched forms. From some extraction steps of the raw debarking water, it would be possible to obtain the hydroxystilbenes in quantities that might be of commercial interest as efficient natural fungicides.

National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-27810 (URN)10.1007/s00226-016-0814-4 (DOI)000373743300012 ()2-s2.0-84961825289 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-06-08 Created: 2016-06-07 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
Edman, M., Eriksson, A.-M. & Villard, M.-A. (2016). The importance of large-tree retention for the persistence of old-growth epiphytic bryophyte Neckera pennata in selection harvest systems. Forest Ecology and Management, 372, 143-148
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The importance of large-tree retention for the persistence of old-growth epiphytic bryophyte Neckera pennata in selection harvest systems
2016 (English)In: Forest Ecology and Management, ISSN 0378-1127, E-ISSN 1872-7042, Vol. 372, p. 143-148Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Partial harvesting methods are generally more similar to the natural dynamics of broad-leaved forests than clear cutting. However, their effects on biodiversity are still poorly understood. We investigated the effects of selection cutting on the occurrence of a large epiphytic bryophyte, Neckera pennata, in a northern hardwood forest of New Brunswick, Canada. Twenty-eight forest stands were selected, repre- senting two contrasting forest management practices: 5–9 years old, first-entry selection cuts and untreated stands that had been subjected to low-intensity single-tree cutting at least 35 years earlier. Within each stand, we quantified the presence–absence of N. pennata on 36 trees and measured selected forest stand variables. Although N. pennata had persisted in post-harvest stands, its frequency of occur- rence on maple trees was only 7% there, compared to 39% in untreated stands. The density of large- diameter sugar maple trees and crown cover were the most important factors predicting the frequency of N. pennata at the stand level. Tree diameter was also a strong predictor of N. pennata’s presence at the tree level and the occupancy of large-diameter maples was almost twice as high in untreated stands as in selection cuts. However, the occupancy of large-diameter maples relative to smaller maple trees was much higher in selection cuts, possibly due to dispersal limitations resulting from reduced connectivity of large-diameter host trees. Taken together, our findings suggest that (1) large trees from older seral stages are a prerequisite for the long-term persistence of N. pennata in managed forests and that (2) they are therefore particularly important for managers to retain in selection cuts. Further, since our results indi- cate that reduced crown cover in selection cuts has a negative effect on N. pennata, the benefit of retaining large host trees would probably increase if buffered within retention patches of maturing trees. Finally, since host tree diameter clearly is a very important factor for the presence of N. pennata, any extension of the harvest rotation would be beneficial.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2016
Keywords
Acer saccharum;Canada; Forest management; Selection cutting; bryophytes
National Category
Natural Sciences Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-27794 (URN)10.1016/j.foreco.2016.04.013 (DOI)000376802600016 ()2-s2.0-84962848879 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-06-03 Created: 2016-06-03 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
Ottosson, E., Kubartova, A., Edman, M., Jönsson, M., Lindhe, A., Stenlid, J. & Dahlberg, A. (2015). Diverse ecological roles within fungal communities in decomposing logs of Picea abies. FEMS Microbiology Ecology, 91(3), Article ID fiv012.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Diverse ecological roles within fungal communities in decomposing logs of Picea abies
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2015 (English)In: FEMS Microbiology Ecology, ISSN 0168-6496, E-ISSN 1574-6941, Vol. 91, no 3, article id fiv012Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Fungal communities in Norway spruce (Picea abies) logs in two forests in Sweden were investigated by 454-sequence analyses and by examining the ecological roles of the detected taxa. We also investigated the relationship between fruit bodies and mycelia in wood and whether community assembly was affected by how the dead wood was formed. Fungal communities were highly variable in terms of phylogenetic composition and ecological roles: 1910 fungal operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were detected; 21% were identified to species level. In total, 58% of the OTUs were ascomycetes and 31% basidiomycetes. Of the 231 337 reads, 38% were ascomycetes and 60% basidiomycetes. Ecological roles were assigned to 35% of the OTUs, accounting for 62% of the reads. Wood-decaying fungi were the most common group; however, other saprotrophic, mycorrhizal, lichenized, parasitic and endophytic fungi were also common. Fungal communities in logs formed by stem breakage were different to those in logs originating from butt breakage or uprooting. DNA of specific species was detected in logs many years after the last recorded fungal fruiting. Combining taxonomic identification with knowledge of ecological roles may provide valuable insights into properties of fungal communities; however, precise ecological information about many fungal species is still lacking.

Keywords
boreal forest, decaying wood, fungal diversity, fungal ecology, Norway spruce, pyrosequencing
National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-25689 (URN)10.1093/femsec/fiv012 (DOI)000352781700009 ()2-s2.0-84996561784 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2015-08-24 Created: 2015-08-18 Last updated: 2018-02-28Bibliographically approved
Fagerlund-Edfeldt, A., Hedenström, E., Edman, M. & Jonsson, B. G. (2014). Effect of Debarking Water from Norway Spruce (Picea abies) on the Growth of Five Species of Wood-Decaying Fungi. Zeitschrift für Naturforschung C - A Journal of Biosciences, 9-10(69c), 418-424
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effect of Debarking Water from Norway Spruce (Picea abies) on the Growth of Five Species of Wood-Decaying Fungi
2014 (English)In: Zeitschrift für Naturforschung C - A Journal of Biosciences, ISSN 0939-5075, E-ISSN 1865-7125, Vol. 9-10, no 69c, p. 418-424Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Norway spruce (Picea abies) debarking water is an aqueous extract obtained as waste from the debarking of logs at paper mills. The debarking water contains a mixture of natural compounds that can exhibit diverse biological activities, potentially including fungicidal activity on some species of wood-decaying fungi. Thus, we investigated the growth rates of such fungi on agar plates to which debarking water extracts had been added. The experiment included five wood-decaying fungi, viz. Gloeophyllum sepiarium, Oligoporus lateritius, Ischnoderma benzoinum, Junghuhnia luteoalba, and Phlebia sp. Growth reduction was observed for all species at the highest tested concentrations of freeze-dried and ethanol-extracted debarking water, the ethyl acetate-soluble fraction and the diethyl ether-soluble fraction. However, the magnitude of the effect varied between different species and strains of individual species. The brown-rot fungi G. sepiarium and O. lateritius were generally the most sensitive species, with the growth of all tested strains being completely inhibited by the ethyl acetate-soluble fraction. These results indicate that development of antifungal wood-protecting agents from debarking water could potentially be a way to make use of a low-value industrial waste.

National Category
Natural Sciences Chemical Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-26306 (URN)10.5560/ZNC.2014-0072 (DOI)000348967800009 ()2-s2.0-84925348944 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2015-11-25 Created: 2015-11-25 Last updated: 2017-12-01Bibliographically approved
Carlsson, F., Edman, M., Holm, S. & Jonsson, B. G. (2014). Effect of heat on interspecific competition in saprotrophic wood fungi. Fungal ecology, 11, 100-106
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effect of heat on interspecific competition in saprotrophic wood fungi
2014 (English)In: Fungal ecology, ISSN 1754-5048, E-ISSN 1878-0083, Vol. 11, p. 100-106Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Some boreal wood fungi that are associated with forest fire or open dry habitats have an increased resistance to heat in comparison to species associated with a less specific distribution or species found in mesic forests. We hypothesize that extreme temperature-stress experienced during fires will favor species adapted to heat and, ultimately, the composition of species inhabiting logs in such habitats will change. Competitiveness after temperature stress was examined in three fire-associated species – Dichomitus squalens, Gloeophyllum sepiarium and Phlebiopsis gigantea – and three non fire-associated species – Ischnoderma benzoinum, Phellinus pini and Fomitopsis pinicola. There was a difference between the fire-associated species and the non fire-associated species with respect to competitive strength after heat stress. All fire-associated species had an advantage after heat treatment, colonizing a larger volume of wood than any non-fire-associated competitor. Our findings suggest that increased heat tolerance of mycelia can exert a competitive balance shift after forest fire. It shows that a system governed by forest fire will be dominance controlled under certain conditions. Furthermore, from a management perspective, during a prescribed burning, certain species already present in the ecosystem will be favored if the fire is not allowed to totally consume the substrates.

Keywords
Fungi, fire, dead wood, Basidiomycetes; Community interactions; Forest fire; Heat resistance; Mycelia; Wood fungi
National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-21408 (URN)10.1016/j.funeco.2014.05.003 (DOI)000342244000011 ()2-s2.0-84906738682 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2014-02-20 Created: 2014-02-20 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
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