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Fagerlund-Edfeldt, Amelie
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Publications (7 of 7) Show all publications
Hedenström, E., Fagerlund-Edfeldt, A., Edman, M. & Jonsson, B.-G. (2016). Resveratrol, piceatannol, and isorhapontigenin from Norway spruce (Picea abies) debarking wastewater as inhibitors on the growth of nine species of wood-decaying fungi. Wood Science and Technology, 50(3), 617-629
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Resveratrol, piceatannol, and isorhapontigenin from Norway spruce (Picea abies) debarking wastewater as inhibitors on the growth of nine species of wood-decaying fungi
2016 (English)In: Wood Science and Technology, ISSN 0043-7719, E-ISSN 1432-5225, Vol. 50, no 3, p. 617-629Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The diethyl ether extract obtained from solvent-solvent extraction of Norway spruce (Picea abies) debarking water, a byproduct from debarking of logs in the pulp and paper industry, was tested for inhibition of growth on agar plates of nine species of wood-decaying fungi: Antrodia sinuosa, Antrodia xantha, Coniophora puteana, Fomitopsis pinicola, Gloeophyllum sepiarium, Heterobasidion parviporum, Phlebiopsis gigantea, Serpula himantioides, and Serpula lacrymans. One fraction of the extract showed excellent antifungal activity for a majority of the species, with complete inhibition of growth for A. sinuosa, A. xantha, and G. sepiarium. The major constituents of the most active fraction were identified as the hydroxystilbenes resveratrol, isorhapontigenin (synonymous with methyl piceatannol), and piceatannol (synonymous with astringenin). The active compounds were isolated or synthesized and used individually for dose-response studies. It was found that isorhapontigenin and piceatannol inhibited all growth of A. sinuosa, A. xantha, and G. sepiarium in 0.35 % weight concentration. The hydroxystilbenes were the three most abundant substances in the debarking water and can be obtained as a mixture or in enriched forms. From some extraction steps of the raw debarking water, it would be possible to obtain the hydroxystilbenes in quantities that might be of commercial interest as efficient natural fungicides.

National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-27810 (URN)10.1007/s00226-016-0814-4 (DOI)000373743300012 ()2-s2.0-84961825289 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-06-08 Created: 2016-06-07 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
Fagerlund-Edfeldt, A., Hedenström, E., Edman, M. & Jonsson, B. G. (2014). Effect of Debarking Water from Norway Spruce (Picea abies) on the Growth of Five Species of Wood-Decaying Fungi. Zeitschrift für Naturforschung C - A Journal of Biosciences, 9-10(69c), 418-424
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effect of Debarking Water from Norway Spruce (Picea abies) on the Growth of Five Species of Wood-Decaying Fungi
2014 (English)In: Zeitschrift für Naturforschung C - A Journal of Biosciences, ISSN 0939-5075, E-ISSN 1865-7125, Vol. 9-10, no 69c, p. 418-424Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Norway spruce (Picea abies) debarking water is an aqueous extract obtained as waste from the debarking of logs at paper mills. The debarking water contains a mixture of natural compounds that can exhibit diverse biological activities, potentially including fungicidal activity on some species of wood-decaying fungi. Thus, we investigated the growth rates of such fungi on agar plates to which debarking water extracts had been added. The experiment included five wood-decaying fungi, viz. Gloeophyllum sepiarium, Oligoporus lateritius, Ischnoderma benzoinum, Junghuhnia luteoalba, and Phlebia sp. Growth reduction was observed for all species at the highest tested concentrations of freeze-dried and ethanol-extracted debarking water, the ethyl acetate-soluble fraction and the diethyl ether-soluble fraction. However, the magnitude of the effect varied between different species and strains of individual species. The brown-rot fungi G. sepiarium and O. lateritius were generally the most sensitive species, with the growth of all tested strains being completely inhibited by the ethyl acetate-soluble fraction. These results indicate that development of antifungal wood-protecting agents from debarking water could potentially be a way to make use of a low-value industrial waste.

National Category
Natural Sciences Chemical Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-26306 (URN)10.5560/ZNC.2014-0072 (DOI)000348967800009 ()2-s2.0-84925348944 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2015-11-25 Created: 2015-11-25 Last updated: 2017-12-01Bibliographically approved
Fagerlund-Edfeldt, A. (2014). Naturally occurring phenols with antioxidant, antifungal and anti-browsing activity. (Doctoral dissertation). Sundsvall: Mid Sweden University
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Naturally occurring phenols with antioxidant, antifungal and anti-browsing activity
2014 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sundsvall: Mid Sweden University, 2014. p. 68
Series
Mid Sweden University doctoral thesis, ISSN 1652-893X ; 198
National Category
Chemical Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-24028 (URN)978-91-87557-77-4 (ISBN)
Public defence
2014-09-26, 11:00
Supervisors
Available from: 2015-01-02 Created: 2015-01-02 Last updated: 2015-03-13Bibliographically approved
Co, M., Fagerlund, A., Engman, L., Sunnerheim, K., Sjöberg, P. J. & Turner, C. (2012). Extraction of Antioxidants from Spruce (Picea abies) Bark using Eco-friendly Solvents. Phytochemical Analysis, 23(1), 1-11
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Extraction of Antioxidants from Spruce (Picea abies) Bark using Eco-friendly Solvents
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2012 (English)In: Phytochemical Analysis, ISSN 0958-0344, E-ISSN 1099-1565, Vol. 23, no 1, p. 1-11Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction - Antioxidants are known to avert oxidation processes and they are found in trees and other plant materials. Tree bark is a major waste product from paper pulp industries; hence it is worthwhile to develop an extraction technique to extract the antioxidants. Objective - To develop a fast and environmentally sustainable extraction technique for the extraction of antioxidants from bark of spruce (Picea abies) and also to identify the extracted antioxidants that are abundant in spruce bark. Methodology - A screening experiment that involved three different techniques was conducted to determine the best technique to extract antioxidants. The antioxidant capacity of the extracts was determined with DPPH (2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl) assay. Pressurised fluid extraction (PFE) turned out to be the best technique and a response surface design was therefore utilised to optimise PFE. Furthermore, NMR and HPLC-DAD-MS/MS were applied to identify the extracted antioxidants. Results - PFE using water and ethanol as solvent at 160 and 180°C, respectively, gave extracts of the highest antioxidant capacity. Stilbene glucosides such as isorhapontin, piceid and astringin were identified in the extracts. Conclusion - The study has shown that PFE is a fast and environmentally sustainable technique, using water and ethanol as solvent for the extraction of antioxidants from spruce bark. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley and Sons, Ltd. This paper includes four tables in which the extracted solid yield and the antioxidant capacity of spruce bark extracts were presented for the different extraction techniques, as well as the response surface coefficients for the optimised PFE were presented. © 2011 John Wiley and Sons, Ltd..

Keywords
Accelerated solvent extraction, Antioxidant, DPPH, Ethanol, Picea abies, Pressurised fluid extraction, Stilbene glucosides, Supercritical fluid extraction, Water
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-14214 (URN)10.1002/pca.1316 (DOI)000298260100001 ()2-s2.0-82955198459 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2011-07-19 Created: 2011-07-19 Last updated: 2017-12-08Bibliographically approved
Fagerlund, A., Sunnerheim, K. & Dimberg, L. H. (2009). Radical-scavenging and antioxidant activity of avenanthramides. Food Chemistry, 113(2), 550-556
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Radical-scavenging and antioxidant activity of avenanthramides
2009 (English)In: Food Chemistry, ISSN 0308-8146, E-ISSN 1873-7072, Vol. 113, no 2, p. 550-556Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Avenanthramides are amides of cinnamoyl-anthranilic acids and, among cereals, are exclusively found in oats. This study investigated the structure-antioxidant activities of 15 avenanthramides with different substitution patterns in the two aromatic rings, seven of which were new avenanthramides synthesised and characterised in this study. Radical-scavenging activity was tested as reactivity towards 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH-). The activity increased with the number of radical-stabilising groups ortho to the phenolic hydroxy group. Both aromatic rings were independently important for activity, while conjugation across the amide bond was of minor importance. Antioxidant activity was determined as inhibition of linoleic acid oxidation. In contrast to the radical-scavenging activity, antioxidant activity was observed for most avenanthramides, and also for compounds with only one hydroxy group in either of the aromatic rings. Compared with alpha-tocopherol, the avenanthramides protected linoleic acid from oxidation to a smaller extent initially, but the effect lasted for a longer time.

Keywords
Antioxidants; Avenanthramides; 1, 1-Diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl; DPPH; Linoleic acid; Oats
National Category
Chemical Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-8300 (URN)10.1016/j.foodchem.2008.07.101 (DOI)000261084600027 ()2-s2.0-53949094995 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2009-01-18 Created: 2009-01-18 Last updated: 2017-10-09Bibliographically approved
Bratt, K., Sunnerheim, K., Bryngelsson, S., Fagerlund, A., Engman, L., Andersson, R. E. & Dimberg, L. H. (2003). Avenanthramides in Oats (Avena Sativa L.) and Structure-Activity Relationships. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, 51(3), 594-600
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Avenanthramides in Oats (Avena Sativa L.) and Structure-Activity Relationships
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2003 (English)In: Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, ISSN 0021-8561, E-ISSN 1520-5118, Vol. 51, no 3, p. 594-600Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Eight avenanthramides, amides of anthranilic acid (1) and 5-hydroxyanthranilic acid (2), respectively, and the four cinnamic acids p-coumaric (p), caffeic (c), ferulic (f), and sinapic (s) acid, were synthesized for identification in oat extracts and for structure−antioxidant activity studies. Three compounds (2p, 2c, and 2f) were found in oat extracts. As assessed by the reactivity toward 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH), all avenanthramides except 1p showed activity. Initially, the antioxidant activity of the avenanthramides decreased in a similar order as for the corresponding cinnamic acids, that is: sinapic > caffeic > ferulic > p-coumaric acid. The avenanthramides derived from 2 were usually slightly more active than those derived from 1. All avenanthramides inhibited azo-initiated peroxidation of linoleic acid. 1c and 1s were initially the most effective compounds. The relative order of antioxidant activities was slightly different for the DPPH and the linoleic acid assays run in methanol and chlorobenzene, respectively.

Keywords
Avena sativa; avenanthramide; caffeic acid; cinnamic acid; p-coumaric acid; dehydrodicinnamic acid dilactone; DPPH; ferulic acid; radical scavengers; sinapic acid
National Category
Organic Chemistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-12812 (URN)10.1021/jf020544f (DOI)
Available from: 2010-12-15 Created: 2010-12-15 Last updated: 2017-12-11Bibliographically approved
Fagerlund, A., Shanks, D., Sunnerheim, K., Engman, L. & Frisell, H. (2003). Protective effects of synthetic and naturally occurring antioxidants in pulp products. Nordic Pulp & Paper Research Journal, 18, 176-181
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Protective effects of synthetic and naturally occurring antioxidants in pulp products
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2003 (English)In: Nordic Pulp & Paper Research Journal, ISSN 0283-2631, E-ISSN 2000-0669, Vol. 18, p. 176-181Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Various types of natural and synthetic antioxidants when added to handsheets of pulp in low concentrations (0.2% weight%) could significantly reduce the emission of hexanal. The most efficient compounds caused a 90% reduction after eight weeks. Their capacity to inhibit brightness reversion was limited.

National Category
Organic Chemistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-12817 (URN)10.3183/NPPRJ-2003-18-02-p176-181 (DOI)
Available from: 2010-12-15 Created: 2010-12-15 Last updated: 2017-12-11Bibliographically approved
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