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Gillander Gådin, KatjaORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-2148-8044
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Publications (10 of 86) Show all publications
Warne, M. & Gillander Gådin, K. (2019). Challenges when Photovoice is used as a research method in the school setting. In: : . Paper presented at The 9th Nordic Health Promotion Research Conference at Roskilde University. Health: Societal responsibility or individual obligation? 12-14 June, 2019. Roskilde, Denmark.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Challenges when Photovoice is used as a research method in the school setting
2019 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

There is growing body of research about visual methods in health promotion. Photovoice (PV), a community based participatory research method, is one of these methods that being used more and more frequently in health promotion (HP) interventions and research with young people. The aim of PV is to increase empowerment and participation among vulnerable groups. PV is often used together with so-called at-risk youth in after- school settings, more seldom in the school setting, as a part of the curriculum, with youth with varied background. The purpose of this study was to highlight dilemmas and discuss challenges when photovoice was used in the school setting as a part of the curriculum. The participants were girls and school staff at a vocational program in an upper secondary school in the Northern part of Sweden. A thematic content analysis was used to analyse data from observations, student workshops, focus groups and face-to face interviews with school staff, with focus on the PV method. The result is on progress but shows challenges that needs to be handled: hierarchies limiting the dialogue, the slow pace of the process creates frustration, and finally the method is likely to reinforce previous mistrust against adults when the participants' proposals are not implemented. The conclusions is that scholars using photovoice as a research method at school need to be aware of challenges when they use PV.

Keywords
Challenges, high school, Photovoice, qualitative method, youth
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-36332 (URN)
Conference
The 9th Nordic Health Promotion Research Conference at Roskilde University. Health: Societal responsibility or individual obligation? 12-14 June, 2019. Roskilde, Denmark
Funder
Public Health Agency of Sweden
Available from: 2019-06-18 Created: 2019-06-18 Last updated: 2019-06-18Bibliographically approved
Hermansson, J., Boggild, H., Hallqvist, J., Karlsson, B., Knutsson, A., Nilsson, T., . . . Gillander Gådin, K. (2019). Interaction between Shift Work and Established Coronary Risk Factors. International Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, 10(2), 57-65, Article ID PII 1466.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Interaction between Shift Work and Established Coronary Risk Factors
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2019 (English)In: International Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, ISSN 2008-6520, E-ISSN 2008-6814, Vol. 10, no 2, p. 57-65, article id PII 1466Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Shift work is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease, but the causes have not yet been fully established. It has been proposed that the coronary risk factors are more hazardous for shift workers, resulting in a potential interaction effect with shift work. Objective: To analyse interaction effects of work schedule and established risk factors for coronary artery disease on the risk of myocardial infarction. Methods: This analysis was conducted in SHEEP/VHEEP, a case-control study conducted in two counties in Sweden, comprising all first-time cases of myocardial infarction among men and women 45-70 years of age with controls stratified by sex, age, and hospital catchment area, totalling to 4648 participants. Synergy index (SI) was used as the main outcome analysis method for interaction analysis. Results: There was an interaction effect between shift work and physical inactivity on the risk of myocardial infarction with SI of 2.05 (95% CI 1.07 to 3.92) for male shift workers. For female shift workers, interaction effects were found with high waist-hip ratio (SI 4.0, 95% CI 1.12 to 14.28) and elevated triglycerides (SI 5.69, 95% CI 1.67 to 19.38). Conclusion: Shift work and some established coronary risk factors have significant interactions.

Keywords
Cardiovascular diseases, Epidemiology, Risk factors, Shift work schedule, Synergy
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-36194 (URN)10.15171/ijoem.2019.1466 (DOI)000466504000003 ()31041922 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85065505931 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-05-22 Created: 2019-05-22 Last updated: 2019-07-09Bibliographically approved
Dahlqvist, H., Landstedt, E. & Gillander Gådin, K. (2019). Poly-victimization of Bullying, Sexual Harassment and Violence in Youth - A Latent Class Analysis. In: : . Paper presented at World Anti Bullying Forum, Dublin, Ireland, 4-6 June, 2019.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Poly-victimization of Bullying, Sexual Harassment and Violence in Youth - A Latent Class Analysis
2019 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Introduction: Violence in a broad sense among youth is common and there is some evidence that there are groups of youth who are victims of more than one form of violence. More knowledge is needed in terms of patterning of subgroups of poly-victimization. The aim was to explore if there are distinct subgroups of youth with particular patterns of violence victimization.

Method: Survey data from a Swedish sample (n = 1,569) of 14-16-year-olds were used (females 48.4%). Measures were physical violence, threat of physical violence, bullying, sexual harassment, and cyber bullying and harassment in the past six months as well as lifetime physical violence. Latent Class Analysis (LCA) was used to identify subgroups of youth with particular violence victimization patterns. Model fit assessment was based on model parsimony, theoretical justification and fit indices criteria (the Akaike information criterion and the Bayesian information criterion).

Result: A three-latent-class model was selected: 1. Poly-victims with high probabilities of being victimized by a multitude of different types of violence (girls 47.6%). 2. Overall low probabilities of violence victimization (girls 47.5%). 3. High probabilities of victimization of sexual harassment off- and online as well as bullying online (girls 65.6%).

Discussion: Three distinct subgroups of violence victimization in youth was evident in the data. There was a greater representation of girls in the purely sexualized violence sub-group. Further research and preventive programs should acknowledge that young people who are victims of one type of violence are likely also to be victims of other types of violence.

National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-36298 (URN)
Conference
World Anti Bullying Forum, Dublin, Ireland, 4-6 June, 2019
Available from: 2019-06-13 Created: 2019-06-13 Last updated: 2019-06-18Bibliographically approved
Zetterström Dahlqvist, H., Landstedt, E. & Gillander Gådin, K. (2018). A Latent Class Analysis of Violence Poly-victimization in Youth. Paper presented at 11th European Public Health Conference. Winds of change: towards new ways of improving public health in Europe, Ljubljana, Slovenia, 28 November - 1 December, 2018. European Journal of Public Health, 28, 483-484
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A Latent Class Analysis of Violence Poly-victimization in Youth
2018 (English)In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 28, p. 483-484Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

Violence among youth is common and has been linked to poor mental health outcomes. There is some evidence that there are groups of youth who are victims of more than one form of violence but more knowledge is needed in terms of patterning of subgroups of multiple violence victimization. Aim: To explore if there are distinct subgroups of youth with particular patterns of violence victimization. Method: Survey data from a Swedish sample (n = 1,569) of youth 14-16 years old were used (females 48.4%). Using a broad definition of violence, respondents indicated if they had experienced physical violence, threat of physical violence, bullying, sexual harassment, cyber bullying, online sexual victimization, and other adverse sexual experience in the past six months as well as lifetime physical violence victimization. Distinct subgroups of youth within the data set with particular patterns of violence victimization were identified using Latent Class Analysis (LCA). Model fit was assessed using the Akaike information criterion (AIC) and the Bayesian information criterion (BIC), with smaller values indicating better model fit. Results: Preliminary results show three distinct subgroups: 1. Sexualized violence off- and online (girls 66.6%), 2. Bullying only (girls 47.5%) and 3. Multi-victimization including threat of physical violence, violence in the past six months and lifetime, sexual harassment on- and offline, bullying on- and offline as well as other adverse sexual experience (girls 47.6%). Conclusions: Three distinct subgroups of violence victimization in a sample of 14-16 year old youth was evident in the data. There was a greater representation of girls in the sexualized violence sub-group. Further research as well as preventive programs should acknowledge that many young people are victims of several types of violence. Future research should also investigate the implications of multi-victimization on mental health outcomes.

National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-35012 (URN)000461384202204 ()
Conference
11th European Public Health Conference. Winds of change: towards new ways of improving public health in Europe, Ljubljana, Slovenia, 28 November - 1 December, 2018
Available from: 2018-12-03 Created: 2018-12-03 Last updated: 2019-05-20Bibliographically approved
Gillander Gådin, K. & Warne, M. (2018). A participatory visual method for increased knowledge of Swedish high school girls’ wellbeing and school achievement. In: : . Paper presented at The 11th European Public Health Conference EPH, Ljubljana, Slovenia, 28 November - 1 December 2018.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A participatory visual method for increased knowledge of Swedish high school girls’ wellbeing and school achievement
2018 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Other academic)
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-35187 (URN)
Conference
The 11th European Public Health Conference EPH, Ljubljana, Slovenia, 28 November - 1 December 2018
Available from: 2018-12-12 Created: 2018-12-12 Last updated: 2018-12-14Bibliographically approved
Warne, M., Gillander Gådin, K., Costenius, C. & Raanaas, R. K. (2018). Challenges and possibilities with participatory visual research methods in health promotion. In: Siw Tone Innstrand, Geir Arild Espnes and Bjarne Bruun Jensen (Ed.), 10th IUHPE European Conference and International Forum for Health Promotion Research: Implementing Health Promotion inthe Life Course - User Involvementin Practice and Research. Paper presented at the 10th IUHPE - Health Promotion in the Life Course Conference hosted by the Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway, 24 - 26 September 2018. Trondheim
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Challenges and possibilities with participatory visual research methods in health promotion
2018 (English)In: 10th IUHPE European Conference and International Forum for Health Promotion Research: Implementing Health Promotion inthe Life Course - User Involvementin Practice and Research / [ed] Siw Tone Innstrand, Geir Arild Espnes and Bjarne Bruun Jensen, Trondheim, 2018Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The aim of this workshop is to discuss pros andcons using participatory visual methods in health promotion research. The interest of visual research is growing and it is time to look more critical to this increasingly popular research focus. The first part of the session, we shortly introduce visual methods in health promotion by giving examples and experiences from our research. In the second part of the session, we will discuss experiences and reflections about, e.g. vulnerable groups, power relations, ethical problems and the use of photographs together with the participants. The goals for the session are to expand the dialogue about the need for high ethical standards when using visual methods in health promotion research, to share experiences and to create contact between researchers within this field.

There is growing body of research about visual methods in health promotion and the presenting researchers have, together and separately, used participatory visual methods for data collection and participatory action research. The authors have all experience with the PhotoVoice method, developed by Wang and Burris in the late 90th, as well as other visual methods, like cell philms and drawings and participatory research. Examples from different research projects are; non verbal language of drawings and photographs in participatory visual methods when aiming at understanding children’s life worlds, young girls' experiences of daily life at school and girls' views of sexual harassment. However alongside the many opportunities there are equal number of challenges when using nonverbal arts-based research methods in order to go beyond the limits of language to capture the meaning of lived experience in a multimodal and holistic way.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Trondheim: , 2018
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-35288 (URN)978-82-93158-42-4 (ISBN)978-82-93158-43-1 (ISBN)
Conference
the 10th IUHPE - Health Promotion in the Life Course Conference hosted by the Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway, 24 - 26 September 2018
Available from: 2018-12-18 Created: 2018-12-18 Last updated: 2018-12-19Bibliographically approved
Gillander Gådin, K., Brännström, L., Green, M., Nilsson, S., Ali, A., Wolfe, G. & Hallengren, L. (2018). Efter metoo – unga tjejers perspektiv på våld och sexuella trakasserier och vad vi kan göra åt det. In: : . Paper presented at Almedalsveckan, Almedalen, Visby, 1 juli – 8 juli, 2018.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Efter metoo – unga tjejers perspektiv på våld och sexuella trakasserier och vad vi kan göra åt det
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2018 (Swedish)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-35241 (URN)
Conference
Almedalsveckan, Almedalen, Visby, 1 juli – 8 juli, 2018
Available from: 2018-12-17 Created: 2018-12-17 Last updated: 2018-12-17Bibliographically approved
Svensson, Å., Warne, M. & Gillander Gådin, K. (2018). Energy drink consumption predicts norm-breaking behavior in Swedish adolescents. Paper presented at 11th European Public Health Conference, Ljubljana, Slovenia, 28 November–1 December, 2018. European Journal of Public Health, 28, 331, Article ID cky214.066.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Energy drink consumption predicts norm-breaking behavior in Swedish adolescents
2018 (English)In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 28, p. 331-, article id cky214.066Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: The health impact of adolescents’ consumption of energy drinks (ED) has been studied; however, previous research mainly used cross-sectional data. The aim of the present study was to describe the consumption of ED in a sample of Swedish adolescents in relation to self-reported health, support and norm-breaking behavior, and to investigate the longitudinal associations between ED consumption and norm-breaking behavior.

Methods: The study was carried out in a municipality in The North of Sweden in 2010-2011 and includes data from 1622 adolescents in grades 6-9 who completed a questionnaire in school. Frequency of ED consumption (never vs. ever) was calculated, and chi-square test and logistic regression were used to compare ED consumption with self-reported health, support and norm-breaking behavior (i.e., truancy, staying home from school to play computer games, the use of alcohol and tobacco, and not eating breakfast or lunch every school day).

Results: Preliminary results showed that boys consumed ED more frequently than girls: 74% of boys and 54% of girls reported to ever consume ED (P < 0.001). Frequency of ED consumption was associated with several variables related to self-reported low health, low support, and norm-breaking behavior. The associations were generally stronger among girls. Furthermore, ED consumption was a predictor of norm-breaking behavior one year later, except for not eating lunch every school day and the use of alcohol (for boys). Adjusted OR ranged from 2.02 (95% CI: 1.31, 3.10) (not eating breakfast every school day) to 4.98 (95% CI: 2.34, 10.63) (staying home from school to play computer games).

Conclusions: In this study, adolescents’ consumption of ED was associated with several undesirable conditions and behaviors. ED consumption may thus be an important target for health promotion in young people, especially since it can predict norm-breaking behavior later on.

Key messages: Adolescents who consume ED are more likely to engage in norm-breaking behavior compared to those who never consume ED, concurrently as well as a year later. The associations between ED consumption and undesirable behaviors and conditions were stronger for girls than boys, suggesting that the relatively smaller group of girls who use ED is more vulnerable.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2018
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-35193 (URN)10.1093/eurpub/cky260 (DOI)000461384201301 ()
Conference
11th European Public Health Conference, Ljubljana, Slovenia, 28 November–1 December, 2018
Available from: 2018-12-13 Created: 2018-12-13 Last updated: 2019-05-20Bibliographically approved
Mathur Gaiha, S. & Gillander Gådin, K. (2018). ‘No time for health’: Exploring couples’ health promotion in Indian slums. Health Promotion International
Open this publication in new window or tab >>‘No time for health’: Exploring couples’ health promotion in Indian slums
2018 (English)In: Health Promotion International, ISSN 0957-4824, E-ISSN 1460-2245Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Joint involvement of couples is an effective strategy to increase contraceptive use and improve reproductive health of women. However, engaging couples to understand how their gender attitudes affect their personal and family health is an idea in search of practice. This mixed-methods study explores opportunities and barriers to couples' participation in health promotion in three slums of Delhi. For each couple, surveys and semi-structured interviews were conducted with husbands and wives individually to contrast self and spousal work, time, interest in health, sources of information related to health and depth of knowledge (n = 62). Urban poverty forces men to work long hours and women to enter part-time work in the informal sector. Paid work induces lack of availability at home, lack of interest in health information and in performing household chores and a self-perception of being healthy among men. These factors inhibit men's' participation in community-based health promotion activities. Women's unpaid work in the household remains unnoticed. Women were expected to be interested in and to make time to attend community-based health-related activities. Men recalled significantly less sources of health information than their spouse. Men and their wives showed similar depth of health-related knowledge, likely due to their spousal communication, with women acting as gatekeepers. Health promotion planners must recognize time constraints, reliance on informal interpersonal communication as a source of health information and the need to portray positive masculinities that address asymmetric gender relations. Innovative, continuous and collaborative approaches may support couples to proactively care about health in low-resource settings.

Keywords
community-based health promotion, public health, couple, gender, slums/poverty
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-35185 (URN)10.1093/heapro/day101 (DOI)
Available from: 2018-12-12 Created: 2018-12-12 Last updated: 2019-01-08Bibliographically approved
Zetterström Dahlqvist, H. & Gillander Gådin, K. (2018). Online Sexual Victimisation in Youth: Predictors and Cross-Sectional Associations with Depressive Symptoms. European Journal of Public Health, 28(6), 1018-1023
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Online Sexual Victimisation in Youth: Predictors and Cross-Sectional Associations with Depressive Symptoms
2018 (English)In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 28, no 6, p. 1018-1023Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim

The aim was to analyze (i) the prevalence of online unwanted sexual solicitation (USS) victimization, (ii) predictors of online USS and (iii) the associations between online USS and depressive symptoms in Swedish pupils in grades 7–9.

Methods

An electronic questionnaire was disseminated in 2011 in schools in a municipality in the northern part of Sweden. Total n = 1193 (boys n = 566; girls n= 627). Logistic regression models were fitted to test the cross-sectional associations between predictors of online USS and depressive symptoms, respectively.

Results

One third of girls and every fifth boy reported online USS victimization. In boys, predictors associated with online USS were offline bullying and sexual harassment victimization. Only offline sexual harassment victimization was associated with online USS in girls. Girls victimized by online USS had about twice the likelihood to report depressive symptoms compared to non-victimized girls. There were no associations between online USS and depressive symptoms in boys. While offline bullying was associated with depressive symptoms in both genders, offline sexual harassment victimization increased the likelihood to report depressive symptoms in girls only.

Conclusions

Online USS was common among Swedish youth, particularly among girls. Schools, parents and internet safety educators should look at co-occurrence of different forms of victimization as offline victimization was a predictor of online USS. Online USS was associated with depressive symptoms in girls and may hence be a factor driving gender inequity in mental health in youth.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2018
Keywords
adolescent depressive disorders, internet, sexual harassment, bullying, victimization
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-33608 (URN)10.1093/eurpub/cky102 (DOI)000456673500009 ()29868848 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85056721364 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-05-13 Created: 2018-05-13 Last updated: 2019-03-18Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-2148-8044

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