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Knutsson, Anders
Publications (10 of 137) Show all publications
Hermansson, J., Boggild, H., Hallqvist, J., Karlsson, B., Knutsson, A., Nilsson, T., . . . Gillander Gådin, K. (2019). Interaction between Shift Work and Established Coronary Risk Factors. International Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, 10(2), 57-65, Article ID PII 1466.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Interaction between Shift Work and Established Coronary Risk Factors
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2019 (English)In: International Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, ISSN 2008-6520, E-ISSN 2008-6814, Vol. 10, no 2, p. 57-65, article id PII 1466Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Shift work is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease, but the causes have not yet been fully established. It has been proposed that the coronary risk factors are more hazardous for shift workers, resulting in a potential interaction effect with shift work. Objective: To analyse interaction effects of work schedule and established risk factors for coronary artery disease on the risk of myocardial infarction. Methods: This analysis was conducted in SHEEP/VHEEP, a case-control study conducted in two counties in Sweden, comprising all first-time cases of myocardial infarction among men and women 45-70 years of age with controls stratified by sex, age, and hospital catchment area, totalling to 4648 participants. Synergy index (SI) was used as the main outcome analysis method for interaction analysis. Results: There was an interaction effect between shift work and physical inactivity on the risk of myocardial infarction with SI of 2.05 (95% CI 1.07 to 3.92) for male shift workers. For female shift workers, interaction effects were found with high waist-hip ratio (SI 4.0, 95% CI 1.12 to 14.28) and elevated triglycerides (SI 5.69, 95% CI 1.67 to 19.38). Conclusion: Shift work and some established coronary risk factors have significant interactions.

Keywords
Cardiovascular diseases, Epidemiology, Risk factors, Shift work schedule, Synergy
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-36194 (URN)10.15171/ijoem.2019.1466 (DOI)000466504000003 ()31041922 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85065505931 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-05-22 Created: 2019-05-22 Last updated: 2019-07-09Bibliographically approved
Krstev, S. & Knutsson, A. (2019). Occupational Risk Factors for Prostate Cancer: A Meta-Analysis. Journal Of Cancer Prevention, 24(2), 91-111
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Occupational Risk Factors for Prostate Cancer: A Meta-Analysis
2019 (English)In: Journal Of Cancer Prevention, ISSN 2288-3649, Vol. 24, no 2, p. 91-111Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Prostate cancer is the second most common cancer in men worldwide. There are many occupational factors that have been suggested to cause prostate cancer. Our aim was to evaluate the evidence for causality by a literature review of occupational factors. We searched literature in Medline and SCOPUS from 1966 to June 30, 2015 to identify occupational risk factors for prostate cancer. The following risk factors were selected: farmers/agricultural workers, pesticides - whole group, and separately organophosphate and organochlorine pesticides, carbamates and triazines, cadmium, chromium, cutting fluids, acrylonitrile, rubber manufacturing, whole body vibration, shift work, flight personnel, ionizing radiation, and occupational physical activity. For each factor a literature search was performed and presented as meta-analysis of relative risk and heterogeneity (Q and I-2 index). A total of 168 original studies met the inclusion criteria with 90,688 prostate cancer cases. Significantly increased risks were observed for the following occupational exposures: pesticides (metaRR = 1.15, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.01-1.32; I-2 = 84%), and specifically group of organochlorine pesticides (meta relative risk [metaRR] = 1.08, 95% CI = 1.03-1.14; I-2 = 0%), chromium (metaRR = 1.19, 95% CI = 1.07-1.34; I-2 = 31%), shift work (metaRR = 1.25, 95% CI = 1.05-1.49; I-2 = 78%) and pilots (metaRR = 1.41, 95% CI = 1.02-1.94; I-2 = 63%) and occupational physical activity in cohort studies (metaRR = 0.87, 95% CI = 0.81-0.94; I-2 = 0%). The literature review supports a causal association for a few of the previously suggested factors.

Keywords
Epidemiologic studies, Work-place factors, Exposure assessment, Causal association, Literature search
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-36820 (URN)10.15430/JCP.2019.24.2.91 (DOI)000477679600004 ()31360689 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-08-12 Created: 2019-08-12 Last updated: 2019-08-12Bibliographically approved
Kivimäki, M., Singh-Manoux, A., Pentti, J., Sabia, S., Nyberg, S. T., Alfredsson, L., . . . Jokela, M. (2019). Physical inactivity, cardiometabolic disease, and risk of dementia: an individual-participant meta-analysis. BMJ. British Medical Journal, 365, Article ID l1495.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Physical inactivity, cardiometabolic disease, and risk of dementia: an individual-participant meta-analysis
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2019 (English)In: BMJ. British Medical Journal, E-ISSN 1756-1833, Vol. 365, article id l1495Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVE To examine whether physical inactivity is a risk factor for dementia, with attention to the role of cardiometabolic disease in this association and reverse causation bias that arises from changes in physical activity in the preclinical (prodromal) phase of dementia.

DESIGN Meta-analysis of 19 prospective observational cohort studies.

DATA SOURCES The Individual-Participant-Data Meta-analysis in Working Populations Consortium, the Inter-University Consortium for Political and Social Research, and the UK Data Service, including a total of 19 of a potential 9741 studies.

REVIEW METHOD The search strategy was designed to retrieve individual-participant data from prospective cohort studies. Exposure was physical inactivity; primary outcomes were incident all-cause dementia and Alzheimer's disease; and the secondary outcome was incident cardiometabolic disease (that is, diabetes, coronary heart disease, and stroke). Summary estimates were obtained using random effects meta-analysis.

RESULTS Study population included 404 840 people (mean age 45.5 years, 57.7% women) who were initially free of dementia, had a measurement of physical inactivity at study entry, and were linked to electronic health records. In 6.0 million person-years at risk, we recorded 2044 incident cases of all-cause dementia. In studies with data on dementia subtype, the number of incident cases of Alzheimer's disease was 1602 in 5.2 million person-years. When measured < 10 years before dementia diagnosis (that is, the preclinical stage of dementia), physical inactivity was associated with increased incidence of all-cause dementia (hazard ratio 1.40, 95% confidence interval 1.23 to 1.71) and Alzheimer's disease (1.36, 1.12 to 1.65). When reverse causation was minimised by assessing physical activity >= 10 years before dementia onset, no difference in dementia risk between physically active and inactive participants was observed (hazard ratios 1.01 (0.89 to 1.14) and 0.96 (0.85 to 1.08) for the two outcomes). Physical inactivity was consistently associated with increased risk of incident diabetes (hazard ratio 1.42, 1.25 to 1.61), coronary heart disease (1.24, 1.13 to 1.36), and stroke (1.16, 1.05 to 1.27). Among people in whom cardiometabolic disease preceded dementia, physical inactivity was non-significantly associated with dementia (hazard ratio for physical activity assessed > 10 before dementia onset 1.30, 0.79 to 2.14).

CONCLUSIONS In analyses that addressed bias due to reverse causation, physical inactivity was not associated with all-cause dementia or Alzheimer's disease, although an indication of excess dementia risk was observed in a subgroup of physically inactive individuals who developed cardiometabolic disease.

National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-36190 (URN)10.1136/bmj.l1495 (DOI)000465550000004 ()30995986 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85064695071 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-05-22 Created: 2019-05-22 Last updated: 2019-07-08Bibliographically approved
Kivimäki, M., Luukkonen, R., Batty, G. D., Ferrie, J. E., Pentti, J., Nyberg, S. T., . . . Jokela, M. (2018). Body mass index and risk of dementia: Analysis of individual-level data from 1.3 million individuals. Alzheimer's & Dementia, 14(5), 601-609
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Body mass index and risk of dementia: Analysis of individual-level data from 1.3 million individuals
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2018 (English)In: Alzheimer's & Dementia, ISSN 1552-5260, E-ISSN 1552-5279, Vol. 14, no 5, p. 601-609Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction: Higher midlife body mass index (BMI) is suggested to increase the risk of dementia, but weight loss during the preclinical dementia phase may mask such effects. Methods: We examined this hypothesis in 1,349,857 dementia-free participants from 39 cohort studies. BMI was assessed at baseline. Dementia was ascertained at follow-up using linkage to electronic health records (N = 6894). We assumed BMI is little affected by preclinical dementia when assessed decades before dementia onset and much affected when assessed nearer diagnosis. Results: Hazard ratios per 5-kg/m2 increase in BMI for dementia were 0.71 (95% confidence interval = 0.66-0.77), 0.94 (0.89-0.99), and 1.16 (1.05-1.27) when BMI was assessed 10 years, 10-20 years, and &gt;20 years before dementia diagnosis. Conclusions: The association between BMI and dementia is likely to be attributable to two different processes: a harmful effect of higher BMI, which is observable in long follow-up, and a reverse-causation effect that makes a higher BMI to appear protective when the follow-up is short. 

Keywords
Bias, Body mass index, Cohort study, Dementia, Obesity
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-32715 (URN)10.1016/j.jalz.2017.09.016 (DOI)000432438800003 ()29169013 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85036621583 (Scopus ID)
Note

Available online 21 November 2017

Available from: 2018-01-19 Created: 2018-01-19 Last updated: 2019-08-13Bibliographically approved
Virtanen, M., Jokela, M., Madsen, I. E. H., Hanson, L. L. M., Lallukka, T., Nyberg, S. T., . . . Kivimaki, M. (2018). Long working hours and depressive symptoms: systematic review and meta-analysis of published studies and unpublished individual participant data. Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment and Health, 44(3), 239-250
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Long working hours and depressive symptoms: systematic review and meta-analysis of published studies and unpublished individual participant data
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2018 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment and Health, ISSN 0355-3140, E-ISSN 1795-990X, Vol. 44, no 3, p. 239-250Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives This systematic review and meta-analysis combined published study-level data and unpublished individual-participant data with the aim of quantifying the relation between long working hours and the onset of depressive symptoms.

Methods We searched PubMed and Embase for published prospective cohort studies and included available cohorts with unpublished individual-participant data. We used a random-effects meta-analysis to calculate summary estimates across studies.

Results We identified ten published cohort studies and included unpublished individual-participant data from 18 studies. In the majority of cohorts, long working hours was defined as working >= 55 hours per week. In multivariable-adjusted meta-analyses of 189 729 participants from 35 countries [96 275 men, 93 454 women, follow-up ranging from 1-5 years, 21 747 new-onset cases), there was an overall association of 1.14 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.03-1.25] between long working hours and the onset of depressive symptoms, with significant evidence of heterogeneity (I-2 = 45.1%, P=0.004). A strong association between working hours and depressive symptoms was found in Asian countries (1.50, 95% CI 1.13-2.01), a weaker association in Europe (1.11, 95% CI 1.00-1.22), and no association in North America (0.97, 95% CI 0.70-1.34) or Australia (0.95, 95% CI 0.70-1.29). Differences by other characteristics were small.

Conclusions This observational evidence suggests a moderate association between long working hours and onset of depressive symptoms in Asia and a small association in Europe.

Keywords
depression, mental health, overtime, psychological distress, working life, working time
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-33676 (URN)10.5271/sjweh.3712 (DOI)000431142500003 ()29423526 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85046491041 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-05-30 Created: 2018-05-30 Last updated: 2018-07-02Bibliographically approved
Nyberg, S. T., Batty, G. D., Pentti, J., Virtanen, M., Alfredsson, L., Fransson, E. I., . . . Kivimaki, M. (2018). Obesity and loss of disease-free years owing to major non-communicable diseases: a multicohort study. LANCET PUBLIC HEALTH, 3(10), E490-E497
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Obesity and loss of disease-free years owing to major non-communicable diseases: a multicohort study
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2018 (English)In: LANCET PUBLIC HEALTH, ISSN 2468-2667, Vol. 3, no 10, p. E490-E497Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background Obesity increases the risk of several chronic diseases, but the extent to which the obesity-related loss of disease-free years varies by lifestyle category and across socioeconomic groups is unclear. We estimated the number of years free from major non-communicable diseases in adults who are overweight and obese, compared with those who are normal weight. Methods We pooled individual-level data on body-mass index (BMI) and non-communicable diseases from men and women with no initial evidence of these diseases in European cohort studies from the Individual-Participant-Data Meta-Analysis in Working Populations consortium. BMI was assessed at baseline (1991-2008) and non-communicable diseases (incident type 2 diabetes, coronary heart disease, stroke, cancer, asthma, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease) were ascertained via linkage to records from national health registries, repeated medical examinations, or self-report. Disease-free years from age 40 years to 75 years associated with underweight (BMI <18.5 kg/m(2)), overweight (>= 25 kg/m(2) to <30 kg/m(2)), and obesity (class I [mild] >= 30 kg/m(2) to < 35 kg/m(2); class II-III [severe] >= 35 kg/m(2)) compared with normal weight (>= 18.5 kg/m(2) to <25 kg/m(2)) were estimated. Findings Of 137 503 participants from ten studies, we excluded 6973 owing to missing data and 10 349 with prevalent disease at baseline, resulting in an analytic sample of 120 181 participants. Of 47 127 men, 211 (0.4%) were underweight, 21 468 (45.6%) normal weight, 20 738 (44.0%) overweight, 3982 (8.4%) class I obese, and 728 (1.5%) class II-III obese. The corresponding numbers among the 73 054 women were 1493 (2.0%), 44 760 (61.3%), 19 553 (26.8%), 5670 (7.8%), and 1578 (2.2%), respectively. During 1 328 873 person-years at risk (mean follow-up 11.5 years [range 6.3-18.6]), 8159 men and 8100 women developed at least one non-communicable disease. Between 40 years and 75 years, the estimated number of disease-free years was 29.3 (95% CI 28.8-29.8) in normal-weight men and 29.4 (28.7-30.0) in normal-weight women. Compared with normal weight, the loss of disease-free years in men was 1.8 (95% CI -1.3 to 4.9) for underweight, 1.1 (0.7 to 1.5) for overweight, 3.9 (2.9 to 4.9) for class I obese, and 8.5 (7.1 to 9.8) for class II-III obese. The corresponding estimates for women were 0.0 (-1.4 to 1.4) for underweight, 1.1 (0.6 to 1.5) for overweight, 2.7 (1.5 to 3.9) for class I obese, and 7.3 (6.1 to 8.6) for class II-III obese. The loss of disease-free years associated with class II-III obesity varied between 7.1 and 10.0 years in subgroups of participants of different socioeconomic level, physical activity level, and smoking habit. Interpretation Mild obesity was associated with the loss of one in ten, and severe obesity the loss of one in four potential disease-free years during middle and later adulthood. This increasing loss of disease-free years as obesity becomes more severe occurred in both sexes, among smokers and non-smokers, the physically active and inactive, and across the socioeconomic hierarchy.

National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-34908 (URN)10.1016/S2468-2667(18)30139-7 (DOI)000446908100013 ()30177479 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85054896279 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-11-19 Created: 2018-11-19 Last updated: 2019-08-06Bibliographically approved
Hermansson, J., Hallqvist, J., Karlsson, B., Knutsson, A. & Gillander Gådin, K. (2018). Shift work, parental cardiovascular disease and myocardial infarction in males. Occupational Medicine, 68(2), 120-125
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Shift work, parental cardiovascular disease and myocardial infarction in males
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2018 (English)In: Occupational Medicine, ISSN 0962-7480, E-ISSN 1471-8405, Vol. 68, no 2, p. 120-125Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background Shift work has been associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). However, there is a need for more studies to determine whether there is an interaction between shift work and other risk factors of CVD, thereby increasing the risk of CVD in shift workers. Aims To discern whether shift work and parental mortality from myocardial infarction (MI) or sudden cardiac death (SCD) interact to increase the risk of MI in men. Methods A case-control dataset was used to assess interaction between shift work and parental history of CVD, using death from MI or SCD, or death before age 65, on an additive scale. Results were reported as relative excess risk due to interaction, attributable proportion due to interaction (AP) and synergy index (SI). Results There was an interaction between shift work and paternal mortality from MI or SCD, when both factors were present [SI = 2.39; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.02. 5.6 and AP = 0.4; 95% CI 0.08. 0.73]. Conclusions Paternal mortality from MI or SCD interacts with shift work to increase the risk of MI in men.

National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-33588 (URN)10.1093/occmed/kqy008 (DOI)000429448800010 ()29444274 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85045523319 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-05-08 Created: 2018-05-08 Last updated: 2019-08-06Bibliographically approved
du Prel, J.-B., Runeson-Broberg, R., Westerholm, P., Alfredsson, L., Fahlen, G., Knutsson, A., . . . Peter, R. (2018). Work overcommitment: Is it a trait or a state?. International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health, 91(1), 1-11
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Work overcommitment: Is it a trait or a state?
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2018 (English)In: International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health, ISSN 0340-0131, E-ISSN 1432-1246, Vol. 91, no 1, p. 1-11Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Effort-reward imbalance (ERI) is a well-tested work-related stress model with three components, the two extrinsic components "efforts" and "rewards" and the one intrinsic component "overcommitment". While an imbalance between "efforts" and "rewards" leads to strain reactions, "work-related overcommitment" (OC) has been described as a personal characteristic with a set of attitudes, behaviours, and emotions reflecting excessive striving combined with a strong desire for approval. However, the question whether OC is a personality trait or a response pattern sensitive to changes in the work context (state) is still open. 2940 Swedish industrial employees were included in this longitudinal analysis of the WOLF-Norrland data over 5 years. A change of OC index or its subscales were regressed against a change of freedom of choice at work, extra work, and ERI adjusted for age, sex, and education. While OC was insensitive to changes in freedom of choice at work and extra work, it was clearly associated with changes of work-related stress over time. Three of four OC subscales exhibited statistically significant associations with ERI. For the first time, we studied fundamental characteristics of OC as an independent personality variable (trait) or an outcome variable subject to changes in the work environment (state). The association between external ERI and OC over time supports our hypothesis of OC being a state. Further investigations are needed to establish OC as a trait or a state.

National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-32743 (URN)10.1007/s00420-017-1253-8 (DOI)000419350600001 ()28801694 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85027327139 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-01-25 Created: 2018-01-25 Last updated: 2018-02-22Bibliographically approved
Kivimäki, M., Pentti, J., Ferrie, J. E., Batty, G. D., Nyberg, S. T., Jokela, M., . . . Deanfield, J. (2018). Work stress and risk of death in men and women with and without cardiometabolic disease: a multicohort study. The Lancet Diabetes and Endocrinology, 6(9), 705-713
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Work stress and risk of death in men and women with and without cardiometabolic disease: a multicohort study
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2018 (English)In: The Lancet Diabetes and Endocrinology, ISSN 2213-8587, E-ISSN 2213-8595, Vol. 6, no 9, p. 705-713Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background Although some cardiovascular disease prevention guidelines suggest a need to manage work stress in patients with established cardiometabolic disease, the evidence base for this recommendation is weak. We sought to clarify the status of stress as a risk factor in cardiometabolic disease by investigating the associations between work stress and mortality in men and women with and without pre-existing cardiometabolic disease. Methods In this multicohort study, we used data from seven cohort studies in the IPD-Work consortium, initiated between 1985 and 2002 in Finland, France, Sweden, and the UK, to examine the association between work stress and mortality. Work stress was denoted as job strain or effort-reward imbalance at work. We extracted individual-level data on prevalent cardiometabolic diseases (coronary heart disease, stroke, or diabetes [without differentiation by diabetes type]) at baseline. Work stressors, socioeconomic status, and conventional and lifestyle risk factors (systolic and diastolic blood pressure, total cholesterol, smoking status, BMI, physical activity, and alcohol consumption) were also assessed at baseline. Mortality data, including date and cause of death, were obtained from national death registries. We used Cox proportional hazards regression to study the associations of work stressors with mortality in men and women with and without cardiometabolic disease. Results We identified 102 633 individuals with 1 423 753 person-years at risk (mean follow-up 13.9 years [SD 3.9]), of whom 3441 had prevalent cardiometabolic disease at baseline and 3841 died during follow-up. In men with cardiometabolic disease, age-standardised mortality rates were substantially higher in people with job strain (149.8 per 10 000 person-years) than in those without (97.7 per 10 000 person-years; mortality difference 52.1 per 10 000 person-years; multivariable-adjusted hazard ratio [HR] 1.68, 95% CI 1.19-2.35). This mortality difference for job strain was almost as great as that for current smoking versus former smoking (78.1 per 10 000 person-years) and greater than those due to hypertension, high total cholesterol concentration, obesity, physical inactivity, and high alcohol consumption relative to the corresponding lower risk groups (mortality difference 5.9-44.0 per 10 000 person-years). Excess mortality associated with job strain was also noted in men with cardiometabolic disease who had achieved treatment targets, including groups with a healthy lifestyle (HR 2.01, 95% CI 1.18-3.43) and those with normal blood pressure and no dyslipidaemia (6.17, 1.74-21.9). In all women and in men without cardiometabolic disease, relative risk estimates for the work stress-mortality association were not significant, apart from effort-reward imbalance in men without cardiometabolic disease (mortality difference 6.6 per 10 000 person-years; multivariable-adjusted HR 1.22, 1.06-1.41). Interpretation In men with cardiometabolic disease, the contribution of job strain to risk of death was clinically significant and independent of conventional risk factors and their treatment, and measured lifestyle factors. Standard care targeting conventional risk factors is therefore unlikely to mitigate the mortality risk associated with job strain in this population.

National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-34520 (URN)10.1016/S2213-8587(18)30140-2 (DOI)000442438000017 ()29884468 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85048552925 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-09-26 Created: 2018-09-26 Last updated: 2019-03-27Bibliographically approved
Runeson-Broberg, R., du Prel, J.-B., Westerholm, P., Nordin, M., Knutsson, A., Alfredsson, L., . . . Peter, R. (2017). Age-related associations between work over-commitment and zest for work among Swedish employees from a cross-sectional and longitudinal perspective. Work: A journal of Prevention, Assesment and rehabilitation, 57(2), 269-279
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Age-related associations between work over-commitment and zest for work among Swedish employees from a cross-sectional and longitudinal perspective
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2017 (English)In: Work: A journal of Prevention, Assesment and rehabilitation, ISSN 1051-9815, E-ISSN 1875-9270, Vol. 57, no 2, p. 269-279Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: In aging societies, zest for work may be pivotal when deciding to stay occupationally active longer. Psychosocial work stress is a prevalent public health problem and may have an impact on zest for work. Work over-commitment (WOC) is a personal coping strategy for work stress with excessive striving and a health risk. However, the long-term effect of WOC on zest for work is poorly understood. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the age-related associations of work over-commitment with zest for work. METHODS: During 1996-1998 and 2000-2003, predominantly industrial workers (n = 2940) participated in the WOLF-Norrland study and responded to a questionnaire referring to socio-demographics, WOC, zest for work, effort-reward imbalance proxies, and mental health. Age-adjusted multiple logistic regressions were performed with original and imputed datasets. RESULTS: Cross-sectionally, work overcommitted middle-aged employees had an increased prevalence of poor zest for work compared to their contemporaries without WOC (OR: 3.74 [95%-CI 2.19; 6.40]). However, in a longitudinal analysis associations between onset of 'poor zest for work' and the WOC subscales 'need for approval' (OR: 3.29 [95%-CI 1.04; 10.37]) and 'inability to withdraw from work' (OR: 5.14 [95%-CI 1.32; 20.03]) were observed. CONCLUSION: The longitudinal findings among older employees could be relevant regarding the expected need to remain occupationally active longer.

Keywords
Work stress, WOC, ERI, coping
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-31350 (URN)10.3233/WOR-172555 (DOI)000404774400013 ()28582947 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85021818266 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-08-08 Created: 2017-08-08 Last updated: 2017-08-11Bibliographically approved
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