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Lisspers, Jan
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Publications (10 of 82) Show all publications
Almén, N., Lisspers, J., Öst, L.-G. & Sundin, Ö. (2019). Behavioral stress recovery management intervention for people with high levels of perceived stress: A randomized controlled trial. International Journal of Stress Management
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Behavioral stress recovery management intervention for people with high levels of perceived stress: A randomized controlled trial
2019 (English)In: International Journal of Stress Management, ISSN 1072-5245, E-ISSN 1573-3424Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Continuous and prolonged exposure to stressors or unsuccessfully dealing with such exposure has been suggested as precursors for burnout. Current research indicates that such stress problems could be conceptualized as deficiencies in recovery between periods of stress. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of a behaviorally oriented stress recovery management intervention for people experiencing high levels of stress. A total of 73 individuals with experiences of stress symptoms and high levels of perceived stress (≥ 25 on the Perceived Stress Scale) were randomly allocated to either a 10-week intervention group or a waiting-list control group. Participants were assessed at preintervention, postintervention, and 3-month follow-up. The Perceived Stress Scale, questions about tension, and the Shirom–Melamed Burnout Questionnaire were used as primary outcome measures, and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale was used as a secondary outcome measure. Data were analyzed following the intention-to-treat principle. The analysis demonstrated statistically significant improvements for all measures at posttreatment and at follow-up. The between-groups effect sizes were high at posttreatment and moderate–to-high at follow-up. Intervention focused on stress recovery behavior seems to be an effective way of reducing perceived stress, tension, burnout symptoms, anxiety, and depression in people with stress symptoms and high levels of perceived stress in everyday life. The tested intervention warrants further research. Other stress recovery behavior interventions need to be tested to draw conclusions on the efficacy of stress recovery behavior interventions in general regarding stress and burnout.

National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-37517 (URN)10.1037/str0000140 (DOI)
Available from: 2019-10-10 Created: 2019-10-10 Last updated: 2019-10-10Bibliographically approved
Almén, N., Lisspers, J. & Öst, L.-G. (2019). Stress-Recovery Management: A Pilot Study Using a Single-Subject Experimental Design. Behavior modification
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Stress-Recovery Management: A Pilot Study Using a Single-Subject Experimental Design
2019 (English)In: Behavior modification, ISSN 0145-4455, E-ISSN 1552-4167Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Work-related stress is considered one of the biggest health and safety challenges among the member states of the European Union. A critical factor is recovery between periods of stress. The primary purpose of this study was to investigate whether a brief behaviorally oriented stress-recovery management intervention delivered in an individual setting could reduce stress symptoms among individuals with high levels of perceived stress. A single-subject experimental design with multiple baselines across three individuals was used. The results indicate, with at least moderate experimental control, a temporal relation between the start of the intervention and beneficial changes from baseline in continuous self-recordings of stress symptoms. The changes were maintained at 1-year and 5-year follow-up assessments. Also, self-reporting inventories measuring perceived stress, worry, anxiety, depression, burnout, type A behavior, unwinding and recuperation from work stress, and insomnia showed overall changes in beneficial directions at post-assessment, as well as the two follow-up assessments. The results indicate that a behaviorally oriented stress-recovery management intervention delivered in an individual setting can reduce stress symptoms in individuals with high levels of perceived stress. However, for firm conclusions to be drawn, further research is needed. 

Keywords
behavior modification, intervention, recovery, single-subject experimental design, stress, stress management, stress-recovery
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-35822 (URN)10.1177/0145445518825363 (DOI)
Available from: 2019-03-19 Created: 2019-03-19 Last updated: 2019-03-19Bibliographically approved
Weimer, K., Richard, A. & Lisspers, J. (2018). Challenges in evaluating intervention effects of feedback on residential energy conservation in a field setting. Göteborg: Centre for Consumer Science School of Business, Economics and Law at University of Gothenburg
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Challenges in evaluating intervention effects of feedback on residential energy conservation in a field setting
2018 (English)Report (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

A field intervention investigated the effect of feedback on residential electricity use in households in Sweden. For a period of eight weeks differentiated energy use for daily domestic behaviors was monitored by 15 residents via an internetbased system. Feedback designed based on Relational Frame Theory was convened to enhance motivation for energy conservation and follow-up studies analysed the maintenance of change for another 3 months. Psychological factors including values, attitudes, moral judgment competence, locus of control and sense of coherence were assessed by web surveys. No significant effects of the feedback on reduction of energy use were found. The small sample size and not monitoring warm water energy use were discussed as explanatory factors.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Göteborg: Centre for Consumer Science School of Business, Economics and Law at University of Gothenburg, 2018. p. 26
Series
CFK-rapport, ISSN 1653-7491 ; 2018:1
Keywords
energy conservation, feedback, Relational Frame Theory
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-35435 (URN)
Available from: 2019-01-11 Created: 2019-01-11 Last updated: 2019-11-21Bibliographically approved
Weimer, K., Richard, A., Lisspers, J. & Lipsanen, J. (2017). Values, attitudes, moral judgment competence, locus of control and sense of coherence as determinants of pro-environmental behaviors and behavioral intentions. Journal of Multidisciplinary Engineering Science and Technology, 4(5), 2568-2583
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Values, attitudes, moral judgment competence, locus of control and sense of coherence as determinants of pro-environmental behaviors and behavioral intentions
2017 (English)In: Journal of Multidisciplinary Engineering Science and Technology, ISSN 2458-9403, Vol. 4, no 5, p. 2568-2583Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Based on a survey completed by 463 residents in two Swedish cities, the predictive power of value orientations, awareness of consequences, environmental concern, moral judgment competence, locus of control and sense of coherence were examined on eight types of pro-environmental behaviors and behavioral intentions. The best fitting causal model confirms partly the hypothetical model. Values indirect and direct affect pro-environmental behaviors and behavioral intentions with awareness of consequences and environmental concern as intermediate or transmitting variables. Neither pro-environmental behaviors nor behavioral intentions are affected by awareness of consequences, environmental concern, locus of control, moral judgment competence or sense of coherence. The need of more environmentally specific measures of the predictors in relation to specific behaviors is discussed.

Keywords
values;environmental concern; moral judgment competence; locus of control;sense of coherence; pro-environmental behavior and pro-environmental intention
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-32357 (URN)
Available from: 2017-12-09 Created: 2017-12-09 Last updated: 2019-04-01Bibliographically approved
Eriksson, L. J. K., Jansson, B., Lisspers, J. & Sundin, Ö. (2016). The interactive effect of the Behavioral Inhibition System (BIS) and response inhibition on accuracy in a modified stop-signal task. Personality and Individual Differences, 97, 198-202
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The interactive effect of the Behavioral Inhibition System (BIS) and response inhibition on accuracy in a modified stop-signal task
2016 (English)In: Personality and Individual Differences, ISSN 0191-8869, E-ISSN 1873-3549, Vol. 97, p. 198-202Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The ability to adjust to a changing environment is an important aspect of every-day life and successful goal directed behavior requires the ability to suppress responses that are no longer appropriate. The main purpose of the present study was to examine if the relationship between inhibitory control (as indexed by stop-signal reaction time, SSRT) and behavioral precision is dependent on levels of Gray and McNaughton's Behavioral Inhibition System (BIS). Additionally, the relationship between BIS and electrodermal activity, and the Behavioral Approach System (BAS) and heart rate activity was investigated. A modified stop-signal task was used. The results showed that there was an interaction effect of BIS and SSRT on accuracy, suggesting that among individuals with higher levels of BIS, longer SSRT (i.e. poorer inhibitory ability) was associated with decreased accuracy. There were no significant correlations between trait variables and physiological variables. The results were discussed in terms of higher levels of BIS being a vulnerability factor when the individual's inhibitory ability simultaneously is poor in situations where the ability to inhibit inappropriate behavioral routines is important for task performance.

Keywords
Behavioral Inhibition System (BIS), Behavioral inhibition, Behavioral precision, Stop-signal task
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-28473 (URN)10.1016/j.paid.2016.03.057 (DOI)000375813700033 ()2-s2.0-84961722053 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-07-21 Created: 2016-07-21 Last updated: 2017-11-28Bibliographically approved
Almén, N., Lisspers, J. & Sundin, Ö. (2015). Effects of a Recovery-Focused Intervention for Stress Management: A Randomized Controlled Trial. In: : . Paper presented at The 8th International and the 13th National Congress of Clinical Psychology, Granada, Spain, 19-21 Nov, 2015..
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of a Recovery-Focused Intervention for Stress Management: A Randomized Controlled Trial
2015 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Abstract

INTRODUCTION

Stress symptoms, burnout, poor mental health and long-term sick leave related to these are major problems in Sweden and elsewhere. Evidence-based prevention and treatment efforts are lacking. Research indicates that stress related health problems primarily could be conceptualized as deficiencies in recovery responses between stress periods rather than high level of stress responses per se. Therefore it is relevant to examine whether it is effective to intervene the recovery behavior – instead of the stress behavior - of people with stress symptoms.

OBJECTIVES

The primary purpose of this study was to investigate if a behavioral oriented recovery management intervention could enhance “recovery behaviors” and experiences of recovery and reduce stress related ill health.

METHODS A group based intervention program focusing exclusively on “recovery behavior” in everyday life (earlier developed and tested in two pilot studies) was evaluated in an experimental group study. The intervention consisted of seven group sessions of 2.5 hours over a period of approximately 10 weeks supplemented by an internet based treatment support system. Self- referred subjects with scores above 24.4 on the Perceived stress scale were randomized to the intervention (n=26) or a waiting-list (n=33).

RESUL T

Statistically significant and clinically relevant effects were achieved for the intervention group compare to the waiting-list group: recovery behaviors and experiences of recovery were increased, and levels of perceived stress, worry, anxiety, depression and exhaustion were decreased.

DISCUSSION These results are in line with two previous pilot studies that we have done. A behavioral and recovery oriented intervention seems to be effective to increase the recovery of the individual and decrease stress related ill health. There are reasons to continue to explore the potential of recovery-oriented interventions for example for different populations (such as people with more extensive clinical health problems) and in different contexts. 

National Category
Applied Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-26697 (URN)
Conference
The 8th International and the 13th National Congress of Clinical Psychology, Granada, Spain, 19-21 Nov, 2015.
Projects
Balans i vardagen – experimentell utvärdering av ett återhämtningsfokuserat stresshanteringsprogram.
Available from: 2015-12-20 Created: 2015-12-20 Last updated: 2015-12-22Bibliographically approved
Anderbro, T., Gonder-Frederick, L., Bolinder, J., Lins, P.-E., Wredling, R., Moberg, E., . . . Johansson, U.-B. (2015). Fear of hypoglycemia: relationship to hypoglycemic risk and psychological factors. Acta Diabetologica, 52(3), 581-589
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Fear of hypoglycemia: relationship to hypoglycemic risk and psychological factors
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2015 (English)In: Acta Diabetologica, ISSN 0940-5429, E-ISSN 1432-5233, Vol. 52, no 3, p. 581-589Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The major aims of this study were to examine (1) the association between fear of hypoglycemia (FOH) in adults with type 1 diabetes with demographic, psychological (anxiety and depression), and disease-specific clinical factors (hypoglycemia history and unawareness, A(1c)), including severe hypoglycemia (SH), and (2) differences in patient subgroups categorized by level of FOH and risk of SH. Questionnaires were mailed to 764 patients with type 1 diabetes including the Swedish translation of the Hypoglycemia Fear Survey (HFS) and other psychological measures including the Perceived Stress Scale, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, Anxiety Sensitivity Index, Social Phobia Scale, and Fear of Complications Scale. A questionnaire to assess hypoglycemia history was also included and A(1c) measures were obtained from medical records. Statistical analyses included univariate approaches, multiple stepwise linear regressions, Chi-square t tests, and ANOVAs. Regressions showed that several clinical factors (SH history, frequency of nocturnal hypoglycemia, self-monitoring) were significantly associated with FOH but R (2) increased from 16.25 to 39.2 % when anxiety measures were added to the model. When patients were categorized by level of FOH (low, high) and SH risk (low, high), subgroups showed significant differences in non-diabetes-related anxiety, hypoglycemia history, self-monitoring, and glycemic control. There is a strong link between FOH and non-diabetes-related anxiety, as well as hypoglycemia history. Comparison of patient subgroups categorized according to level of FOH and SH risk demonstrated the complexity of FOH and identified important differences in psychological and clinical variables, which have implications for clinical interventions.

Keywords
Type 1 diabetes, Hypoglycemia, Fear of hypoglycemia, Severe hypoglycemia, Psychological factors
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Endocrinology and Diabetes Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-25642 (URN)10.1007/s00592-014-0694-8 (DOI)000355233500018 ()25528005 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84930084883 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2015-08-28 Created: 2015-08-18 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
Partanen, P., Jansson, B., Lisspers, J. & Sundin, Ö. (2015). Metacognitive Strategy Training Adds to the Effects of Working Memory Training in Children with Special Educational Needs. International Journal of Psychological Studies, 7(3), 130-140
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Metacognitive Strategy Training Adds to the Effects of Working Memory Training in Children with Special Educational Needs
2015 (English)In: International Journal of Psychological Studies, ISSN 1918-7211, E-ISSN 1918-722X, Vol. 7, no 3, p. 130-140Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The effects of computer-based Working Memory (WM) training using two training procedures were examined among sixty-four primary-school children with Special Educational Needs (SEN). Measures of general cognitive ability, auditory and visuospatial working memory, arithmetic ability, and reading and writing skills were gathered and analysed. The referred group of SEN children predominantly had lower performance in auditory WM, arithmetics and reading and writing skills. The SEN children within respective school were randomized into either an active WM training group or a control group and ten schools participating in the WM training study were randomized into one of two different training conditions. At five schools the SEN children received regular WM training and at the other five schools the children received WM training with the addition of metacognitive strategy training. Results showed a significant difference in WM performance during training in favor of the metacognitive intervention. Furthermore, transfer effects occurred on visuospatial WM measures at posttest and at 6-month follow-up. Post-hoc tests showed that the effects pertained only to the metacognitive intervention. No transfer to arithmetic or reading and writing skills occurred after training in the two training conditions. Results were discussed in terms of metacognitive factors being important in optimizing performance in WM training, and that such factors should be taken into consideration when designing interventions for children with SEN. It is also suggested that in referral of children with SEN to remediation with WM training the WM profiles should be taken into consideration to a greater degree. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Canadian Center of Science and Education, 2015
Keywords
children with special educational needs, metacognitive strategy training, working memory training
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-26402 (URN)10.5539/ijps.v7n3p130 (DOI)
Available from: 2015-12-09 Created: 2015-12-09 Last updated: 2017-12-01Bibliographically approved
Perk, J., Hambraeus, K., Burell, G., Carlsson, R., Johansson, P. & Lisspers, J. (2015). Study of Patient Information after percutaneous Coronary Intervention (SPICI): should prevention programmes become more effective?. EuroIntervention, 10(11), e1-e7
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Study of Patient Information after percutaneous Coronary Intervention (SPICI): should prevention programmes become more effective?
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2015 (English)In: EuroIntervention, ISSN 1774-024X, E-ISSN 1969-6213, Vol. 10, no 11, p. e1-e7Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aims: This cross-sectional observational study was designed to evaluate the uptake and outcome of patient education after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Methods and results: A questionnaire containing 41 items was handed out to consecutive patients from randomly selected Swedish hospitals after PCI. Questions concerned the patient's attribution of the cause of the cardiac event, perception of the information provided by physicians and nurses, and a self-assessment of changes in lifestyle post PCI regarding tobacco, physical activity, food habits and stress. Replies were obtained from 1,073 patients (reply rate 67%). Non-modifiable risk factors (age, heredity) were attributed a higher rate as the cause of disease compared to modifiable factors (smoking, physical activity, food habits). Most patients (67%) perceived they were cured, and 38% perceived from the given information that there was no need to change their habits. A mere 27% reported that they still had cardiovascular disease and needed behavioural change. After PCI, 16% continued to use tobacco; half of these were offered smoking cessation support. In spite of an 80% referral rate to cardiac rehabilitation, one out of two patients did not enrol. Fewer than half were regularly physically active. Nutritional counselling was provided to 71%, but only 40% changed food habits. Stress management programmes were rarely provided. Conclusions: Current preventive practice scarcely meets the challenge posed by the progress in modern invasive cardiology. The Study of Patient Information after percutaneous Coronary Intervention (SPICI) motivates an in-depth revision and adaptation of cardiac rehabilitation programmes in order to improve patient understanding of the disease, and to support greater compliance with a cardioprotective lifestyle.

Keywords
Cardiac rehabilitation, Compliance, Coronary artery disease, Lifestyle, Patient education, Percutaneous coronary intervention
National Category
Psychology Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-21780 (URN)10.4244/EIJV10I11A223 (DOI)24472705 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84927591363 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2014-04-15 Created: 2014-04-15 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
Perk, J., Burell, G., Carlsson, R., Hambraeus, K., Johansson, P. & Lisspers, J. (2014). Allvarliga brister i rådgivning till koronarsjuka patienter efter ballongvidgning patienter undervärderar levnadsvanors betydelse, visar enkätstudie. Läkartidningen, 111(42), 1835
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Allvarliga brister i rådgivning till koronarsjuka patienter efter ballongvidgning patienter undervärderar levnadsvanors betydelse, visar enkätstudie
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2014 (Swedish)In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 111, no 42, p. 1835-Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In a questionnaire 1073 patients from 29 randomly selected Swedish hospitals who had undergone percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) were asked what they considered to be the cause of their coronary disease, how they experienced the information given by the medical staff and in which way had they adopted a heart-healthy lifestyle. The main outcomes were; A majority attributed the cause of the disease to non-modifiable factors, i.e. age and heredity. Merely one in four patients had perceived the information in a correct way: they still carried the coronary disease and needed to adapt their lifestyle. Half of the patient population had increased their physical activity and likewise merely half had changed their food habits. Half of the tobacco users had quit after PCI. Thus the results of this study shows that there is ample space for improving the present care of post-PCI patients.

National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-24069 (URN)2-s2.0-84908274630 (Scopus ID)
Note

Export Date: 7 January 2015

Available from: 2015-01-08 Created: 2015-01-07 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
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