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Danielski, I., Krook, M. & Weimer, K. (2018). Atrium in residential buildings – a design to enhance social interaction in urban areas in Nordic climates. In: Dennis Johansson, Hans Bagge, Åsa Wahlström (Ed.), Cold Climate HVAC 2018: Sustainable Buildings in Cold Climates (pp. 773-789). Cham: Springer
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Atrium in residential buildings – a design to enhance social interaction in urban areas in Nordic climates
2018 (English)In: Cold Climate HVAC 2018: Sustainable Buildings in Cold Climates / [ed] Dennis Johansson, Hans Bagge, Åsa Wahlström, Cham: Springer, 2018, p. 773-789Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The design concept of conditioned atria receive growing popularity in  both commercial and service buildings all over the world, but still not common in the residential sector. This study used a psychological framework to examine if building design with enclosed heated atria in apartment buildings can enhance sense of community and social interactions in Nordic climates. A qualitative study was conducted to understand the perception of residents living in apartment buildings with heated atrium. One of the few examples in Sweden. This was compared to the experience of residents in a “traditional” apartment building without an atrium. The questionnaire was comprised of six parts: (i) socio-demographic aspects; (ii) information about the apartment; (iii) social activities within the building; (iv) social interaction with neighbours; (v) information about principles in life; and (vi) sense of community linked to their homes.

The results showed significant social differences between the residents of the atrium and “traditional” buildings, which could not be explained solely by differences in preferences and principles in life. A large proportion of the social differences between the buildings could be explained by the building design, as the common and semi-private areas within the atrium building provide opportunities to establish social interactions. The residents in the atrium building was found to have greater sense of community and higher frequency of interactions, which are both parts of social sustainability.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cham: Springer, 2018
Series
Springer Proceedings in Energy, ISSN 2352-2534
Keywords
Atrium, Residential building, Social interactions
National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary Architectural Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-35311 (URN)10.1007/978-3-030-00662-4_65 (DOI)978-3-030-00661-7 (ISBN)978-3-030-00662-4 (ISBN)
Available from: 2018-12-20 Created: 2018-12-20 Last updated: 2018-12-20Bibliographically approved
Danielski, I. (2018). How to lift students 10,000 meter up above ground. In: : . Paper presented at 1st international Education with Sustainability conference, Sligo, Ireland, August 20-22, 2018..
Open this publication in new window or tab >>How to lift students 10,000 meter up above ground
2018 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Environment problems are complex and require a system integrated approach, which involves different time scales and spatial resolution. Yet, many parts of the world are facing similar environmental challenges. Therefore, mankind needs to share knowledge and work together across physical borders, language barriers, and cultures differences.

In our International Master's programme in Ecotechnology and Sustainable Development in Mid-Sweden University, we use new pedagogical technologies to bring students from different nations and cultures together and reinforce teamwork. All courses in the program are in English and students can choose to be present in the classroom or to stream lectures online in real-time. Via special software, teachers are able to communicate both with classroom and distance students simultaneously. This provides flexibility to access graduate level courses in environmental science from anywhere in the world.

Still, we aim to unify the students as one group. To achieve that, all students are invited to a joint activity in a mountain area nearby the university for one week. There, they are performing different field measurements, which help them to know each other and develop a group feeling. Group assignments are red thread throughout the program. It enhances student communication and exchange of information from different parts of the world.

The overall aim of the master programme is to “lift” the students 10.000 meter up above ground. From that height they can see forests, water systems, cities and societies and not individual trees, streams, buildings or people. Only then they can understand how environmental issues are related and could be analyzed. This is achieved by introducing a variety of advanced system modelling tools, policy instruments, impact strategies, and communication skills. After graduation, the students are able to assist policy makers to resolve a variety of integrated environmental issues with ecological, social, cultural and economic perspectives.

Keywords
Graduate programme, distance education, integrated environmental assessment.
National Category
Pedagogy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-34870 (URN)
Conference
1st international Education with Sustainability conference, Sligo, Ireland, August 20-22, 2018.
Available from: 2018-11-09 Created: 2018-11-09 Last updated: 2018-11-14Bibliographically approved
Danielski, I. & Fröling, M. (2018). In situ measurements of thermal properties of building fabrics using thermography under non-steady state heat flow conditions. Infrastructures, 3(3), Article ID 20.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>In situ measurements of thermal properties of building fabrics using thermography under non-steady state heat flow conditions
2018 (English)In: Infrastructures, ISSN 2412-3811, Vol. 3, no 3, article id 20Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study describes a quantitative method using thermography to measure the thermal properties of building fabrics that are subjected to non-steady state heat flow due to consistently changing meteorological conditions. The method includes two parts. First, the convection heat transfer coefficient is measured by thermography and heat flux meters on a small segment of the examined building fabric with uniform surface temperature. Then, thermal properties of large building fabrics are evaluated by thermography. The two parts are measured simultaneously. The method was tested on 140/160/190 mm thick massive laminated spruce timber walls of a test facility cabin located in Östersund, Sweden. The results varied by only a few percent in comparison to validation measurements performed with heat flux meters and in comparison, to values from the literature. Due to rapid changes in weather conditions the measured values had large disparity, but still a linear regression with low confidence interval was obtained. Obtaining an accurate value of convection heat transfer was important for achieving high measurement accuracy and, therefore, the value of this parameter should be measured. Other important factors to consider are solar radiation, reflected infrared (IR) radiation from nearby objects and the number of thermal images.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2018
Keywords
Conductivity, building fabrics, thermal transmittance, thermal imaging, thermography, U-value, heat flux meters
National Category
Remote Sensing Building Technologies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-34869 (URN)10.3390/infrastructures3030020 (DOI)
Available from: 2018-11-09 Created: 2018-11-09 Last updated: 2018-11-14Bibliographically approved
Danielski, I., Weimer, K. & Krook, M. (2017). Atria: en design för hållbara bostäder i ett nordiskt klimat. In: Edith Andresen, Gustav Lidén, Sara Nyhlén (Ed.), Hållbarhetens många ansikten: samtal, forskning och fantasier (pp. 47-54). Sundsvall: Mid Sweden University
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Atria: en design för hållbara bostäder i ett nordiskt klimat
2017 (Swedish)In: Hållbarhetens många ansikten: samtal, forskning och fantasier / [ed] Edith Andresen, Gustav Lidén, Sara Nyhlén, Sundsvall: Mid Sweden University , 2017, p. 47-54Chapter in book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sundsvall: Mid Sweden University, 2017
Series
Genusstudier vid Mittuniversitetet, ISSN 1654-5753 ; 13
National Category
Building Technologies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-32297 (URN)978-91-88527-37-0 (ISBN)
Available from: 2017-12-06 Created: 2017-12-06 Last updated: 2018-12-20
Danielski, I., Weimer, K. & Krook, M. (2017). Atrium in residential buildings – a design to enhance social sustainability in urban areas. In: Daniel Laven, Wilhelm Skoglund (Ed.), Valuing and Evaluating Creativity for Sustainable Regional Development: Design, sustainability and its impact on social community and cultural/creative development. Paper presented at VEC 2016 (pp. 153-155). Östersund: Mid Sweden University
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Atrium in residential buildings – a design to enhance social sustainability in urban areas
2017 (English)In: Valuing and Evaluating Creativity for Sustainable Regional Development: Design, sustainability and its impact on social community and cultural/creative development / [ed] Daniel Laven, Wilhelm Skoglund, Östersund: Mid Sweden University , 2017, p. 153-155Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Östersund: Mid Sweden University, 2017
Keywords
social interactions, Residential buildings, Atrium, Nordic climates
National Category
Architectural Engineering Social Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-32491 (URN)978-91-88527-26-4 (ISBN)
Conference
VEC 2016
Note

Sessions F1-6

Available from: 2017-12-18 Created: 2017-12-18 Last updated: 2018-12-20Bibliographically approved
Danielski, I. (2016). Energy performance of residential buildings design. In: E. Grönlund & A. Longueville (Ed.), Society’s steering systems: a Friend book to Inga Carlman (pp. 179-186). Östersund: Mid Sweden University
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Energy performance of residential buildings design
2016 (English)In: Society’s steering systems: a Friend book to Inga Carlman / [ed] E. Grönlund & A. Longueville, Östersund: Mid Sweden University , 2016, p. 179-186Chapter in book (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Through the history of civilization, humans have built shelters to practice their social activities, while having protection against weather, wild animals, and other human beings. Over the course of time, vernacular dwellings have evolved to respond to climate challenges, available materials and cultural expectations in a given location. Such buildings include, e.g. the adobe house, the Inuit igloos in Greenland, and the open courtyard building design.Since the start of the postmodern architecture, in the middle of the 20th century, new technologies, new materials, and changes in societal structures have changed the way buildings have been designed and constructed. Modern lifestyle become more dependent on energy. For example Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning systems (HVAC) in buildings became widely used to improve indoor comfort. After the oil-supply crises in the middle of the 1970s, the connection between building design and the environment changed from just providing sufficient thermal comfort to promoting energy efficiency due to the awareness of the fact that natural resources are limited. That was the start of the sustainable architecture movement. It was during this time building regulations in many countries started to include aspects of energy efficiency. This chapter will discuss two aspects of building design and their effect on the overall energy efficiency of the building: the interior building design and the exterior building design.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Östersund: Mid Sweden University, 2016
Keywords
Building design, Form factor, residential buildings, energy efficiency
National Category
Energy Systems Environmental Analysis and Construction Information Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-32490 (URN)978-91-88025-97-5 (ISBN)
Available from: 2017-12-18 Created: 2017-12-18 Last updated: 2018-12-20Bibliographically approved
Danielski, I. (2016). Energy performance of residential buildings: projecting, monitoring and evaluating. (Doctoral dissertation). Östersund: Mittuniversitetet
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Energy performance of residential buildings: projecting, monitoring and evaluating
2016 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Energy security and climate change mitigation have been discussed in Sweden since the oil crisis in the 1970s. Sweden has since then increased its share of renewable energy resources to reach the highest level among the EU member states, but is still among the countries with the highest primary energy use per capita. Not least because of that, increasing energy efficiency is important and it is part of the Swedish long term environmental objectives. Large potential for improving energy efficiency can be found in the building sector, mainly in the existing building stock but also in new constructions.

Buildings hold high costs for construction, service and maintenance. Still, their energy efficiency and thermal performance are rarely validated after construction or renovation. As energy efficiency become an important aspects in building design there is a need for accurate tools for assessing the energy performance both before and after building construction. In this thesis criteria for energy efficiency in new residential buildings are studied. Several building design aspects are discussed with regards to final energy efficiency, energy supply-demand interactions and social aspects. The results of this thesis are based on energy modelling, energy measurements and one questionnaire survey. Several existing residential buildings were used as case studies.

The results show that pre-occupancy calculations of specific final energy demand in residential buildings is too rough an indicator to explicitly steer towards lower final energy use in the building sector. Even post occupancy monitoring of specific final energy demand does not always provide a representative image of the energy efficiency of buildings and may result with large variation among buildings with similar thermal efficiency. A post occupancy method of assessing thermal efficiency of building fabrics using thermography is presented. The thermal efficiency of buildings can be increased by design with low shape factor. The shape factor was found to have a significant effect on the final energy demand of buildings and on the use of primary energy. In Nordic climates, atria in multi-storey apartment buildings is a design that have a potential to increase both energy efficiency (by lower shape factor) and enhance social interactions among the occupants.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Östersund: Mittuniversitetet, 2016. p. 62
Series
Mid Sweden University doctoral thesis, ISSN 1652-893X ; 238
National Category
Energy Systems Architectural Engineering Building Technologies Environmental Analysis and Construction Information Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-27175 (URN)978-91-88025-52-4 (ISBN)
Public defence
2016-02-23, G1352, Östersund, 11:04 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2016-03-04 Created: 2016-03-03 Last updated: 2018-12-20Bibliographically approved
Danielski, I., Nair, G., Joelsson, A. & Fröling, M. (2016). Heated atrium in multi-storey apartment buildings, a design with potential to enhance energy efficiency and to facilitate social interactions. Building and Environment, 106, 352-364
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Heated atrium in multi-storey apartment buildings, a design with potential to enhance energy efficiency and to facilitate social interactions
2016 (English)In: Building and Environment, ISSN 0360-1323, E-ISSN 1873-684X, Vol. 106, p. 352-364Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The design concept of conditioned atria gains increasing popularity in commercial and service buildings all over the world, but is still not a common building design in the residential sector. This study investigates the potential of such design in residential buildings in Nordic climates as means to enhance both energy efficiency as well as social interaction among residents. Energy modelling was used to compare energy efficiency among designs of residential buildings with and without atrium and to identify important design parameters. Social interaction was analysed, based on a survey evaluating the perception of residents living in an existing multi-storey apartment building designed with a heated atrium in the north of Sweden.

The results show that heated atrium in Nordic climates have a potential to reduce the total final energy demand while at the same time increase the conditioned space of the building. To positively impact energy efficiency, the atrium should fulfil three requirements: (i) it should be designed to reduce the shape factor for the whole building; (ii) it should have the minimum glazed area that comply with the building requirements concerning natural light and visual comfort; and (iii) adjustable solar shading should be installed in the atrium’s façades to avoid unwanted overheating. The survey results indicate that the additional space created by the atrium has a potential to facilitate and promote social interaction among residents and to increases a sense of neighbourliness and belongingness, which are often discussed as important parameters in relation to social sustainability.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2016
Keywords
Atrium, Courtyard, Shape factor, Energy efficiency, Residential building
National Category
Environmental Sciences Building Technologies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-28486 (URN)10.1016/j.buildenv.2016.06.038 (DOI)000382600100031 ()2-s2.0-84978411000 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-07-21 Created: 2016-07-21 Last updated: 2018-12-20Bibliographically approved
Jonasson, J., Danielski, I., Mikaelsson, L.-Å. & Fröling, M. (2016). Plannig To Build Sustainable? -The Case Of Storsjö Strand. In: Proceedings of: Linnaeus ECO-TECH 2016: . Paper presented at 10th International conference Linnaeus Eco-Tech 2016, Kalmar, Sweden, November 21-23, 2016.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Plannig To Build Sustainable? -The Case Of Storsjö Strand
2016 (English)In: Proceedings of: Linnaeus ECO-TECH 2016, 2016Conference paper, Published paper (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The municipality of Östersund is presently developing a new township called Storsjö Strand close to the town centre by the lakefront of the lake Storsjön. The ambition is that the new area should be a good example of more sustainable building engineering and societal planning. Mid Sweden University was engaged to follow the process in action research setting, and to enhance the learning process. A triple helix process intending to better achieve such outcomes was presented at the Eco-tech 2014 conference. The process has now moved to a stage where the first two buildings are erected.

This paper reports on present status with a focus on how the sustainability goals have been transferred through the chain of involved organizations and individuals, developers and contractors, but also how the goals affect the production of the building, regarding materials, methods and costs, based on interviews . We have observed connections between sustainability outcomes, and the combination of quality of the goals set for the project and the types of processes for achieving them. So far, it seems like the sustainability goals partly have been transferred through the process. The process will be followed until the buildings has been in use for some time

Keywords
Sustainable Buildings, Building processes, Integrated Planning
National Category
Construction Management
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-29696 (URN)
Conference
10th International conference Linnaeus Eco-Tech 2016, Kalmar, Sweden, November 21-23, 2016
Available from: 2016-12-21 Created: 2016-12-21 Last updated: 2018-12-20Bibliographically approved
Danielski, I. & Fröling, M. (2015). Diagnosis of buildings' thermal performance - a quantitative method using thermography under non-steady state heat flow. Energy Procedia, 83, 320-329
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Diagnosis of buildings' thermal performance - a quantitative method using thermography under non-steady state heat flow
2015 (English)In: Energy Procedia, ISSN 1876-6102, E-ISSN 1876-6102, Vol. 83, p. 320-329Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study describes a quantitative method using thermography to measure the thermal performance of complete building envelope elements that are subjected to non-steady state heat flow. The method presumes that thermal properties of external walls, like conductivity, could still be obtained by a linear regression over values of independent measurements. And therefore could be used during fluctuating indoor and outdoor thermal conditions. The method is divided into two parts. First, the convection heat transfer coefficient is measured by heat flux meters (HFM) and thermography. And then, the overall heat transfer coefficient of a complete building element is measured by thermography to include all non-uniformities.

In this study the thermal performance of a 140 mm thick laminated timber wall was measured. The wall was subjected to the outdoor weather conditions in Östersund, Sweden during January and February. The measurement values were found to have a large disparity as expected due to the rapid change in weather conditions. But still a linear regression with low confidence interval was obtained. The thermography results from a small uniform wall segment were validated with HFM measurements and 4% difference was found, which suggest that the two methods could be equally effective. Yet, thermography has the advantage of measuring surface temperature over large area of building element. The overall heat transfer coefficient of a large wall area was found to be 11% higher in comparison to the HFM measurements. This indicates that thermography could provide a more representative result as it captures areas of imperfections, point and linear thermal bridges.

Keywords
heat transfer coefficient, convection, thermal transmittance, conductivity, infrared imaging
National Category
Energy Engineering Other Civil Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-27174 (URN)10.1016/j.egypro.2015.12.186 (DOI)2-s2.0-84958152570 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-03-03 Created: 2016-03-03 Last updated: 2018-12-20Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-5356-7471

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