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Eriksson, L. J. K., Jansson, B. & Sundin, Ö. (2019). Psychometric properties of a Swedish version of the reinforcement sensitivity theory of personality questionnaire. Nordic Psychology, 71(2), 134-145
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Psychometric properties of a Swedish version of the reinforcement sensitivity theory of personality questionnaire
2019 (English)In: Nordic Psychology, ISSN 1901-2276, E-ISSN 1904-0016, Vol. 71, no 2, p. 134-145Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The reinforcement sensitivity theory of personality questionnaire (RST-PQ) is based on a theoretical analysis of the revised reinforcement sensitivity theory. Using a Swedish sample stratified by age and gender, the aim of this study was to test the six-factor structure of a Swedish version of the RST-PQ. Further, we examined the convergent and discriminant validity of the questionnaire. The results of the confirmatory factor analysis showed that the Swedish version did not fully provide support for the six-factor structure. An attempt to improve the model fit resulted in a significantly better model fit for a six-factor structure containing 52 items. Issues concerning the convergent validity were found, as indicated by all six factors having more than 50% of the variance due to error. The discriminant validity was satisfactory for all factors, except for goal-drive persistence and reward interest, which were highly correlated. This indicates a non-independence between these two factors in the model. Nevertheless, the RST-PQ has considerable promise and more emphasis should be put on investigating the convergent validity by using for example broader samples, stratified by country of origin, age, and gender. 

Keywords
confirmatory factor analysis, convergent validity, discriminant validity, reinforcement sensitivity theory
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-35158 (URN)10.1080/19012276.2018.1516563 (DOI)000467825200006 ()2-s2.0-85057324600 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-12-11 Created: 2018-12-11 Last updated: 2019-06-28Bibliographically approved
Jansson, B. & Sundin, Ö. (2019). The reliability and factorial validity of the Swedish version of the Revised Controlling Behaviors Scale. Journal of Interpersonal Violence, 34(18), 3850-3863
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The reliability and factorial validity of the Swedish version of the Revised Controlling Behaviors Scale
2019 (English)In: Journal of Interpersonal Violence, ISSN 0886-2605, E-ISSN 1552-6518, Vol. 34, no 18, p. 3850-3863Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study focused on the factor structure of the victimization form of the revised Controlling Behaviors Scale (CBS-R). Data from 1,218 women and men were analyzed in the study. Results of confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) failed to find support for the proposed five-factor structure of the scale, as the items on the scale were better represented by one common factor. In addition, when examining if controlling behaviors are distinct from psychological aggression, the CFA indicated that the items on the CBS-R are clearly distinguishable from the items on the psychological aggression (as measured with the subscales of the revised Conflict Tactic Scales [CTS2]), and that this holds for both males and females. Implications for the general use of the CBS-R and for use in conjunction with psychological aggression and physical aggression in intimate partner violence were discussed.

Keywords
intimate partner violence, controlling behavior, psychological aggression, factor structure
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-29624 (URN)10.1177/0886260516672936 (DOI)
Available from: 2016-12-16 Created: 2016-12-16 Last updated: 2019-08-13Bibliographically approved
Almén, N., Lundberg, H., Sundin, Ö. & Jansson, B. (2018). The reliability and factorial validity of the Swedish version of the Recovery Experience Questionnaire. Nordic Psychology, 70(4), 324-333
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The reliability and factorial validity of the Swedish version of the Recovery Experience Questionnaire
2018 (English)In: Nordic Psychology, ISSN 1901-2276, E-ISSN 1904-0016, Vol. 70, no 4, p. 324-333Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Recent research has indicated that recovery from work stress and effort might be crucial for health and well-being. Thus, a valid measurement of recovery becomes important. The main purpose of the present study was to empirically evaluate and seeking support for the hypothesized four-factor model of the Swedish version of Recovery Experience Questionnaire (REQ). The total sample (N = 680) was randomly split into two subsamples. The first subsample was used for finding the best-fitting model using an exploratory factor analysis and the second subsample was used to test the a priori model using confirmatory factor analysis. The results support the proposed four-factor structure of the scale for both males and females. Additionally, apart from high reliability estimates, this instrument proved to have good convergent and discriminant validity for all four factors. Implications for the use of the REQ in conjunction with recovery-focused interventions were discussed, as were limitations such as low response rate. 

Keywords
assessement, factor analysis, job stress recovery, psychophysiological deactivation, questionnaire, recovery experiences
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-33303 (URN)10.1080/19012276.2018.1443280 (DOI)000455353500006 ()2-s2.0-85042935938 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-03-19 Created: 2018-03-19 Last updated: 2019-03-26Bibliographically approved
Esteves, F., Bernhardsson, J., Jansson, B. & Sundin, Ö. (2017). Emotional arousal and attention bias to female body shapes. In: : . Paper presented at 57 Annual Meeting of the Society for Psychophysiological Research, Vienna, Austria, October 11-15, 2017 (pp. s151-s151). , 54
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Emotional arousal and attention bias to female body shapes
2017 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
National Category
Social Sciences Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-33459 (URN)000415045300606 ()
Conference
57 Annual Meeting of the Society for Psychophysiological Research, Vienna, Austria, October 11-15, 2017
Available from: 2018-04-08 Created: 2018-04-08 Last updated: 2019-05-28Bibliographically approved
Tabrizi, F. & Jansson, B. (2017). Memory Modulation: Some Support for Modality Specific Effects. In: : . Paper presented at International Convention of Psychological Science (ICPS), Vienna, March 23-25, 2017.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Memory Modulation: Some Support for Modality Specific Effects
2017 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Using aversive auditory stimuli to induce involuntary memories, the present study investigated if emotional memories can be modulated. In line with the modality specific approach to intrusion development, the study found that intrusive auditory memories can be prevented by performing a verbal interference task following exposure to the experimental trauma.  

National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-32168 (URN)
Conference
International Convention of Psychological Science (ICPS), Vienna, March 23-25, 2017
Available from: 2017-11-27 Created: 2017-11-27 Last updated: 2017-11-28Bibliographically approved
Jansson, B. & Danielsson, U. (2017). The Direct and Indirect Effect of Computer Use on Psychological and Somatic Symptoms Among Boys and Girls in Three Different Age Cohorts. International Journal of School Health, 4(4), 1-5, Article ID e13851.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Direct and Indirect Effect of Computer Use on Psychological and Somatic Symptoms Among Boys and Girls in Three Different Age Cohorts
2017 (English)In: International Journal of School Health, ISSN 2345-5152, E-ISSN 2383-1219, Vol. 4, no 4, p. 1-5, article id e13851Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study focused on the direct and indirect effect (via sleep duration) of computer use on psychological and somatic symptoms among boys and girls (N = 6112) in 3 different age cohorts (11, 13, and 15-years old) from the 2013/2014 health behaviour in school-aged children (HBSC) study done in Sweden. Structural equation modeling (with SPSS AMOS 22) was used (specifying separate multigroup models for each age group). The mediating effect of sleep duration was tested for significance using a Bootstrap estimation. Across the age groups, the direct effect of computer use was found to be a significant risk factor for psychological and somatic symptoms among both girls and boys (all the P values < 0.05), as the associations between computer use was only partly mediated by sleep duration. Additionally, the magnitude of the effects for the association between computer use and both psychological and somatic symptoms was quite similar among boys and girls across different age cohorts, but tended to be more pronounced among 13-year old girls. In particular, the direct and indirect effect computer use on psychological symptoms was significantly stronger among girls in this age cohort (all the P values < 0.05). Even though the cross-sectional design of the study prevented causal conclusions, the development of strategies to reduce children and adolescents’ computer screen time and the need to focus on mechanisms relating ICT use to somatic and psychological symptoms were emphasized.

Keywords
Health, Computer, Age
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-32470 (URN)10.5812/intjsh.13851 (DOI)
Note

Published online 2017 September 17

Available from: 2017-12-15 Created: 2017-12-15 Last updated: 2017-12-21Bibliographically approved
Tabrizi, F. & Jansson, B. (2016). Reducing involuntary memory by interfering consolidation of stressful auditory information: A pilot study. Journal of Behavior Therapy and Experimental Psychiatry, 50, 238-244
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Reducing involuntary memory by interfering consolidation of stressful auditory information: A pilot study
2016 (English)In: Journal of Behavior Therapy and Experimental Psychiatry, ISSN 0005-7916, E-ISSN 1873-7943, Vol. 50, p. 238-244Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background and objectives: Intrusive emotional memories were induced by aversive auditory stimuli and modulated with cognitive tasks performed post-encoding (i.e., during consolidation). Method: A between-subjects design was used with four conditions; three consolidation-interference tasks (a visuospatial and two verbal interference tasks) and a no-task control condition. Forty-one participants listened to a soundtrack depicting traumatic scenes (e.g., police brutality, torture and rape). Immediately after listening to the soundtrack, the subjects completed a randomly assigned task for 10 min. Intrusions from the soundtrack were reported in a diary during the following seven-day period. Results: In line with a modality-specific approach to intrusion modulation, auditory intrusions were reduced by verbal tasks compared to both a no-task and a visuospatial interference task.. Limitations: The study did not control for individual differences in imagery ability which may be a feature in intrusion development. Conclusions: The results provide an increased understanding of how intrusive mental images can be modulated which may have implications for preventive treatment. (c) 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Keywords
Post-traumatic stress disorder, Involuntary memories, Memory consolidation, Working memory
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-26877 (URN)10.1016/j.jbtep.2015.09.003 (DOI)000367213200032 ()2-s2.0-84942474546 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-01-15 Created: 2016-01-15 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
Thirus, J., Starbrink, M. & Jansson, B. (2016). Relational frame theory, mathematical and logical skills: A multiple exemplar training intervention to enhance intellectual performance. International Journal of Psychology & Psychological Therapy / Revista Internacional de Psicologia y Terapia Psicologica, 16(2), 141-155
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Relational frame theory, mathematical and logical skills: A multiple exemplar training intervention to enhance intellectual performance
2016 (English)In: International Journal of Psychology & Psychological Therapy / Revista Internacional de Psicologia y Terapia Psicologica, ISSN 1577-7057, E-ISSN 2340-2857, Vol. 16, no 2, p. 141-155Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The current study investigated the effects of Relational Frame Theory (RFT) based training on mathematical and logical skills. A sample of 21 Swedish high school students attending first grade and second grade were assigned to either training (n= 10) or no-training conditions (n=11). Measures of performance on mathematical tests, Raven's Standard Progressive Matrices (SPM), and relational responding tasks were taken prior to and after training. For 8-10 weeks, the experimental group trained using SMART, an online multiple exemplar training program for enhancing relational skills. No significant differences between the groups were found on mathematical performance. A significant increase on SPM performance was observed for the experimental group. The findings are in line with previous research on RFT, suggesting that behaviorally based interventions can enhance intellectual performance. Population characteristics, SMART training procedures, strengths and methodological limitations are discussed. © 2016 AAC.

Keywords
Intelligence, Mathematical skills, Multiple exemplar training, Relational responding, RFT
National Category
Psychology Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-28492 (URN)2-s2.0-84973441023 (Scopus ID)
Note

Article

Available from: 2016-07-22 Created: 2016-07-21 Last updated: 2017-08-09Bibliographically approved
Eriksson, L. J. K., Jansson, B., Lisspers, J. & Sundin, Ö. (2016). The interactive effect of the Behavioral Inhibition System (BIS) and response inhibition on accuracy in a modified stop-signal task. Personality and Individual Differences, 97, 198-202
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The interactive effect of the Behavioral Inhibition System (BIS) and response inhibition on accuracy in a modified stop-signal task
2016 (English)In: Personality and Individual Differences, ISSN 0191-8869, E-ISSN 1873-3549, Vol. 97, p. 198-202Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The ability to adjust to a changing environment is an important aspect of every-day life and successful goal directed behavior requires the ability to suppress responses that are no longer appropriate. The main purpose of the present study was to examine if the relationship between inhibitory control (as indexed by stop-signal reaction time, SSRT) and behavioral precision is dependent on levels of Gray and McNaughton's Behavioral Inhibition System (BIS). Additionally, the relationship between BIS and electrodermal activity, and the Behavioral Approach System (BAS) and heart rate activity was investigated. A modified stop-signal task was used. The results showed that there was an interaction effect of BIS and SSRT on accuracy, suggesting that among individuals with higher levels of BIS, longer SSRT (i.e. poorer inhibitory ability) was associated with decreased accuracy. There were no significant correlations between trait variables and physiological variables. The results were discussed in terms of higher levels of BIS being a vulnerability factor when the individual's inhibitory ability simultaneously is poor in situations where the ability to inhibit inappropriate behavioral routines is important for task performance.

Keywords
Behavioral Inhibition System (BIS), Behavioral inhibition, Behavioral precision, Stop-signal task
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-28473 (URN)10.1016/j.paid.2016.03.057 (DOI)000375813700033 ()2-s2.0-84961722053 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-07-21 Created: 2016-07-21 Last updated: 2017-11-28Bibliographically approved
Ramnerö, J. & Jansson, B. (2016). The stability of treatment goals, as assessed by a Swedish version of the Bern Inventory of Treatment Goals. Nordic Psychology, 68(1), 30-39
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The stability of treatment goals, as assessed by a Swedish version of the Bern Inventory of Treatment Goals
2016 (English)In: Nordic Psychology, ISSN 1901-2276, E-ISSN 1904-0016, Vol. 68, no 1, p. 30-39Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Formulating treatment goals has been shown to be an area of vital concern for both outcome and treatment processes. However, it is not as yet an area of structured routine assessment, either in clinical practice or in research. One possible explanation for this is the lack of validated and readily available goal assessment procedures. The present study investigated the test-retest stability of a Swedish translation of the checklist version of the Bern Inventory of Treatment Goals (BIT-C) among 30 patients in primary care. We calculated the consistency of the endorsement of the different therapeutic goal categories over a 2-week period prior to treatment. There were no changes in symptoms or quality-of-life-related measures between the two assessment points. Overall, the goal category items in BIT-C were found to demonstrate moderate to substantial reliability. In conclusion, even though our study was small, it provided initial psychometric support for the Swedish version of BIT-C as a clinically useful tool for the assessment of treatment goals.

Keywords
BIT-C, goal assessment, goal stability, treatment goals
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-29495 (URN)10.1080/19012276.2015.1045544 (DOI)000375607900004 ()2-s2.0-84957433344 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-12-09 Created: 2016-12-09 Last updated: 2017-11-29Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-1508-9621

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