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Sveino Strand, A. M., Kvangarsnes, M., Landstad, B. J., Kvalsvik Teige, B. & Hole, T. (2019). Hvilke legekvalifikasjoner er det behov for ved øyeblikkelig hjelp døgnopphold?. Michael, 3(16), 293-305
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Hvilke legekvalifikasjoner er det behov for ved øyeblikkelig hjelp døgnopphold?
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2019 (Norwegian)In: Michael, ISSN 1893-9651, E-ISSN 1893-0794, Vol. 3, no 16, p. 293-305Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

What Doctor Qualifications are necessary in Emergency Hospitalization in the Norwegian Primary Health Care Service?

Emergency hospitalization in the municipality is a new kind of treatment for patients needing urgent medical care in the Norwegian primary health care service. The purpose of this study was to obtain an insight into what qualifications doctors with experience from emergency hospitalization in the municipality deem important. Ten Norwegian doctors with experience from emergency hospitalization in the municipality were interviewed in three focus groups spring 2016. Systematic text condensation was used in the analysis. The doctors saw the need for general and comprehensive competence. In their experience, central qualifications were thorough knowledge of primary health care, good clinical and communicative skills, and competence in advanced teamwork. Emergency hospitalization in the municipality leads to a new responsibility for doctors in the Norwegian primary health care service. Findings suggest that the work demands experienced doctors who work independently, but who also take the lead in interprofessional collaboration.

Keywords
helsetjenestereformer, kommunehelsetjeneste, legekompetanse, legekvalifikasjoner, medisinsk utdanning
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-37808 (URN)
Available from: 2019-11-27 Created: 2019-11-27 Last updated: 2019-11-28Bibliographically approved
Tjulin, Å., Landstad, B., Vinberg, S., Eriksson, A. & Hagqvist, E. (2019). Managers’ learning process during a health-promoting leadership intervention. Health Education, 119(5/6), 350-365
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Managers’ learning process during a health-promoting leadership intervention
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2019 (English)In: Health Education, ISSN 0965-4283, E-ISSN 1758-714X, Vol. 119, no 5/6, p. 350-365Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Abstract

Purpose

The increasingly demanding psychosocial working conditions in Swedish public sector workplaces call for implementation of workplace health promotion (WHP) interventions. There is a need to increase first-line public sector managers’ capacities for health-promoting leadership. The purpose of this paper is to investigate first-line managers’ experiences of participating in an intervention aimed at strengthening health-promoting leadership. More precisely, the aim is to study what obstacles and prerequisites the intervention have for their learning processes to become health-promoting managers.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative study in Northern Sweden at workplaces in the county council and municipalities was conducted. The data were gathered through individual interviews with 18 participating first-line managers. Inductive-content analysis was used to analyse the data.

Findings

The results identify time for reflection and collegial discussions about leadership as prerequisites for learning about health-promoting leadership. Managers experienced the intervention as a confirmation of the leadership behaviours already gained. However, the health-promoting leadership intervention was seen as a contradiction, since organisational prerequisites to implement WHP measures were perceived to be lacking. The managers were not involved in the planning of the intervention and questioned why the organisation did not involve them more when the educational activities were created.

Originality/value

When the organisation understands how and when its managers learn, what they need and want to learn about WHP, and what they already know, tailored participatory interventions can be facilitated that consider the unique prerequisites for the particular organisation.

Keywords
Health promotion, Social interaction, Learning, Qualitative methods, Intervention
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-37387 (URN)10.1108/HE-02-2019-0004 (DOI)
Funder
AFA Insurance
Available from: 2019-09-26 Created: 2019-09-26 Last updated: 2019-11-14Bibliographically approved
Toivanen, S., Hagqvist, E., Landstad, B., Nordenmark, M., Östergren, P.-O. & Vinberg, S. (2019). Mikroföretagares arbetsmiljö och hälsa med fokus på genus och etnicitet - innovationer för tillsyn. In: Arbetsmiljö och ohälsa i ett genusperspektiv: Uppdragsforskning med relevans för tillsynsverksamheten (pp. 43-55). Stockholm: Arbetsmiljöverket
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mikroföretagares arbetsmiljö och hälsa med fokus på genus och etnicitet - innovationer för tillsyn
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2019 (Swedish)In: Arbetsmiljö och ohälsa i ett genusperspektiv: Uppdragsforskning med relevans för tillsynsverksamheten, Stockholm: Arbetsmiljöverket , 2019, , p. 43-59p. 43-55Chapter in book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: Arbetsmiljöverket, 2019. p. 43-59
Series
Rapport 2019:7: Arbetsmiljö och ohälsa i ett genusperspektiv. Arbetsmiljöverket, ISSN 1650-3717
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-37317 (URN)
Available from: 2019-09-24 Created: 2019-09-24 Last updated: 2019-09-27Bibliographically approved
Okkenhaug, A., Tritter, J. Q., Myklebust, T. Å., Deilkås, E., Meirik, K. & Landstad, B. J. (2019). Mitigating risk in Norwegian psychiatric care: Identifying indicators of adverse events through Global Trigger Tool for psychiatric care. International Journal of Risk and Safety in Medicine
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mitigating risk in Norwegian psychiatric care: Identifying indicators of adverse events through Global Trigger Tool for psychiatric care
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2019 (English)In: International Journal of Risk and Safety in Medicine, ISSN 0924-6479, E-ISSN 1878-6847Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND:Patients treated in psychiatric care are exposed to the risk of adverse events, similar to patients treated in somatic health care. OBJECTIVES:In this article we report the findings of triggers associated with adverse events (AEs) identified by a version of the Global Trigger Tool – Psychiatry (GTT-P) adapted for Norwegian hospital-based psychiatric treatment. METHODS:The design was a retrospective analysis of a random sample of 240 patient records from a psychiatric clinic in one Norwegian hospital. Patient records were sampled from both inpatient and outpatient psychiatric clinics in hospitals serving the northern part of the county of Trøndelag, Norway. RESULTS:Our analysis was based on the identification of 32 potential triggers of adverse events. Eighteen of the triggers were significantly related to adverse events. No adverse events were identified in patient records that did not also contain triggers included in the Global Trigger Tool. CONCLUSIONS:There is a clear relationship between the presence of triggers in a patient record and the likelihood of adverse events. Particularly relevant for psychiatric patients is ‘suffering’ as a trigger and this may also be relevant to somatic care and has implications for inclusion in the GTT-P.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
IOS Press, 2019
Keywords
Adverse events, mental health, patient safety, precipitating factors, psychiatry
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-37807 (URN)10.3233/JRS-190064 (DOI)
Available from: 2019-11-27 Created: 2019-11-27 Last updated: 2019-11-28Bibliographically approved
Andersen-Hollekim, T. E., Kvangarsnes, M., Landstad, B. J., Talseth-Palmer, B. A. & Hole, T. (2019). Patient participation in the clinical pathway: Nurses' perceptions of adults' involvement in haemodialysis. Nursing Open, 6(2), 574-582
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Patient participation in the clinical pathway: Nurses' perceptions of adults' involvement in haemodialysis
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2019 (English)In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 574-582Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim: To develop knowledge of nurses' perceptions of participation for patients treated with haemodialysis and their next of kin.

Design: A qualitative study with a hermeneutic approach.

Methods: The data were collected in 2015 through focus groups with 13 nurses in Central Norway.

Results: The nurses reported that patient participation ranging from non-involvement to shared decision-making was related to whether dialysis was initiated as acute or scheduled. The restrictions required in chronic haemodialysis limited participation. The next of kin were not involved. The nurses highlighted interventions on both the individual and system levels to strengthen participation.

Conclusion: Dialysis units should develop strategies for participation related to individual needs and design treatment in cooperation with patients and their families, ensuring involvement early in the clinical pathway. Further research is needed on issues related to next of kin, including their desired level of involvement.

National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-36155 (URN)10.1002/nop2.241 (DOI)000461835600037 ()30918708 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85062985507 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-05-20 Created: 2019-05-20 Last updated: 2019-05-22Bibliographically approved
Bårdsgjerde, E. K., Kvangarsnes, M., Landstad, B., Nylenna, M. & Hole, T. (2019). Patients' narratives of their patient participation in the myocardial infarction pathway. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 75(5), 1063-1073
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Patients' narratives of their patient participation in the myocardial infarction pathway
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2019 (English)In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 75, no 5, p. 1063-1073Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim: To explore how patients in areas without local percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) facilities experience patient participation in different phases of the myocardial infarction pathway. Background: Acute treatment of myocardial infarction often involves PCI. In Norway, this treatment is centralized at certain hospitals; thus, patients often require long-distance transportation and experience frequent hospital transfers. Short hospital stays, transfers between hospitals and the patient's emotional state pose challenges to promoting patient participation. Design: A qualitative design with a narrative approach. Methods: Participants were recruited through purposive sampling. Eight men and two women were interviewed in 2016. Findings: Four themes related to the patients' experiences at the beginning, middle and end of the pathway were identified: (a) Lack of verbal communication in the acute phase; (b) trust in healthcare professionals and treatment; (c) lack of participation and coordination at discharge; and (d) shared decision-making in rehabilitation. The findings showed how the patients moved from a low level of patient participation in the acute phase to a high level of patient participation in the rehabilitation phase. Conclusion: This is the first study to explore patient participation in different phases of the myocardial infarction pathway. We argue that individual plans for information and patient participation are important to improve patient involvement in an earlier stage of the pathway. Further research from a healthcare professional perspective can be valuable to understand this topic. Impact: This study gives new insight that can be valuable for healthcare professionals in implementing patient participation throughout the pathway. 

Keywords
interview, myocardial infarction, myocardial infarction care, narratives, nursing, patient involvement, patient participation, patient pathway, patient perspective, qualitative
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-35820 (URN)10.1111/jan.13931 (DOI)000465107000015 ()30549312 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-03-19 Created: 2019-03-19 Last updated: 2019-05-22Bibliographically approved
Tarberg, A. S., Kvangarsnes, M., Hole, T., Thronæs, M., Madssen, T. S. & Landstad, B. (2019). Silent voices: Family caregivers' narratives of involvement in palliative care. Nursing Open, 6(4), 1446-1454
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Silent voices: Family caregivers' narratives of involvement in palliative care
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2019 (English)In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058, Vol. 6, no 4, p. 1446-1454Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim: To explore how family caregivers experience involvement in palliative care. Design: A qualitative design with a narrative approach was used. Methods: Purposive sampling and narrative interviews were conducted. Eleven bereaved family caregivers for patients with cancer receiving palliative care were interviewed in Mid-Norway between November 2016–May 2017. Results: We identified four themes related to family caregivers' experiences of involvement in the early, middle, terminal and bereavement phases of palliative care: (a) limited involvement in the early phase; (b) emphasis on patient-centred care in the middle phase; (c) lack of preparation for the dying phase; and (d) lack of systematic follow-up after death. Family caregivers experienced low level of involvement throughout the palliative pathway. Conclusion: The involvement of family caregivers in palliative care may not be proportional to their responsibilities. The needs of family caregivers should be addressed in nursing education to give nurses competence to support family caregivers in providing home-based care. 

Keywords
cancer, caregivers, decision-making, narratives, nurses, nursing, palliative care, primary health care
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-36894 (URN)10.1002/nop2.344 (DOI)000481392800001 ()
Available from: 2019-08-20 Created: 2019-08-20 Last updated: 2019-10-25Bibliographically approved
Hedlund, M., Landstad, B. J. & Tritter, J. Q. (2019). The disciplining of self-help: Doing self-help the Norwegian way. Social Science and Medicine, 225, 34-41
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The disciplining of self-help: Doing self-help the Norwegian way
2019 (English)In: Social Science and Medicine, ISSN 0277-9536, E-ISSN 1873-5347, Vol. 225, p. 34-41Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We explore how Norwegian self-help groups are defined and managed to create a particular form of health system governmentality. Self-help groups are typically framed as therapeutic communities where participants define the agenda creating a space where open and equal interaction can produce individual learning and personal growth. In Norway, however, self-help groups are managed in a way that integrates them in to the health system but insulates them from clinical medicine; an approach that disciplines participants to act in a particular way in relation to the health system. We draw on the analysis of 1456 pages of public documents and websites from the National Nodal Point for Self-Help (NPSH), the organisation that manages self-help groups, and central government including individual testimonies from participants published between 2006 and 2014. We argue, drawing on Foucault, that self-help premised on lay-leadership and self-determination is at odds with the centrally defined regulation apparent in the model adopted in Norway and an example of disciplining that reinforces health system governmentality and serves the interests of the medical profession and the state. Further we propose that this illustrates the contestation between the pastoral power of medics, the National Nodal Point for Self-Help and the Ministry of Health. Our analysis of Norwegian self-help as a mechanism to create a particular form of health system governmentality helps explain the expansion of self-help and self-management within developed health systems and provides an explanation for why self-help within health systems, is typically situated adjacent to, rather than integrated into, clinical medicine.

Keywords
Discipline, Governmentality, Health policy, Health system, Norway, Pastoral power, Self-help, Self-management
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-35835 (URN)10.1016/j.socscimed.2019.02.001 (DOI)000463126400005 ()30784849 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85061664107 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-03-20 Created: 2019-03-20 Last updated: 2019-05-22Bibliographically approved
Hagqvist, E., Vinberg, S., Tritter, J. Q., Wall, E. & Landstad, B. (2019). The Same, Only Different: Doing Management in the Intersection between Work and Private Life for Men and Women in Small-scale Enterprises. Work, Employment and Society
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Same, Only Different: Doing Management in the Intersection between Work and Private Life for Men and Women in Small-scale Enterprises
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2019 (English)In: Work, Employment and Society, ISSN 0950-0170, E-ISSN 1469-8722Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

The aim of this article is to elucidate how male and female managers of small-scale enterprises in Norway and Sweden relate to and experience the intersection between work and private life. A qualitative content analysis was adopted to explore interviews with 18 managers. The analysis resulted in three primary categories: conflict as a part of the deal, using management to construct balance, and management identity contributing to enrichment. A key theme that emerged was doing management. Both men and women reproduced masculine values in describing their management identities and in explaining how they enacted management. This clear identification was used to legitimate conflict, construct balance and explain the interaction between work and private life as enriching. How the managers enacted gender emerged primarily in how they related to family responsibilities and their feelings of guilt in relation to home and children.

Keywords
enacting management roles, gender and management, small-scale enterprises, work-life balance, work-life conflict, work-life enrichment
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-37642 (URN)10.1177/0950017019871244 (DOI)
Funder
AFA Insurance, 130190
Available from: 2019-11-07 Created: 2019-11-07 Last updated: 2019-11-08Bibliographically approved
Landstad, B. J. & Åhrberg, Y. (2018). Conceptualizing the driving forces for successful rehabilitation back to work. Disability and Rehabilitation, 40(15), 1781-1790
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Conceptualizing the driving forces for successful rehabilitation back to work
2018 (English)In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 40, no 15, p. 1781-1790Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: An earlier study states that the terms of desire, longing, and vanity carry with them ideas, emotions, and values that influence how individuals perceive themselves and their rehabilitation process. Our aim was (1) to use concept analysis to explore the meaning of the terms desire, longing, and vanity and (2) to investigate the potential role of these concepts in successful rehabilitation back to work. Methods: To achieve these two objectives, we used a model of concept analysis. The final step in the model is to define empirical references, for example, articles within the scientific literature, to determine the existence of a concept in a given situation. Results: The concept analysis resulted in 15 new searchable terms. All of these were accepted in the thesaurus system for the databases we used. We identified 59 scientific articles that were deemed relevant to the purposes of the study. Of these, only 20 was about emotions as driving forces in a rehabilitation process back to work. Conclusion: The conclusion of the study is that the concepts of desire, longing, and vanity encompassed ideas, emotions, and values that influence how individuals perceived themselves and their situations. How individuals talk about and understand rehabilitation will undoubtedly play a role in how they respond to interventions, and thus, the success of the rehabilitation process back to work.Implications for rehabilitationEmotional energy often drives behavior and can provide significant motivation that potentially can mobilize vocational rehabilitation.The concepts of desire, longing and vanity encompass ideas, emotions, and values that influence individuals’ self-perception and their view of their situation. To engage people in discussions on what they long for and desire could be a new way to connect with a person in a rehabilitation situation.It can be less provoking to talk about what a person desires or longs for than to ask them what they want or are motivated for.Feelings of meaningfulness are a basic driving force and a contributing factor in how health is experienced. By affirming the desire to do activities that are liked, this in turn generates motivation to be engaged in other activities. Individual confidence is generated through the experience of mastering a skill and this in turn can underpin a desire to return to work after long-term sick leave. Earlier experience of success can be an inspiration and create expectations for a forthcoming working-role.Emotions relating to work such as pride can generate motivation in a rehabilitation process. Vanity and the possibility of being “ashamed” in a certain situation can be an emotional driving force to re-establish one’s self.

Keywords
Concept analysis, emotions, literature review, long term sick-leave, vocational rehabilitation, women
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-31106 (URN)10.1080/09638288.2017.1312569 (DOI)000431537400006 ()28395536 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85017411234 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-07-03 Created: 2017-07-03 Last updated: 2018-05-30Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-6558-3129

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