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Tjulin, Å., Landstad, B., Vinberg, S., Eriksson, A. & Hagqvist, E. (2019). Managers’ learning process during a health-promoting leadership intervention. Health Education, 119(5/6), 350-365
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Managers’ learning process during a health-promoting leadership intervention
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2019 (English)In: Health Education, ISSN 0965-4283, E-ISSN 1758-714X, Vol. 119, no 5/6, p. 350-365Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Abstract

Purpose

The increasingly demanding psychosocial working conditions in Swedish public sector workplaces call for implementation of workplace health promotion (WHP) interventions. There is a need to increase first-line public sector managers’ capacities for health-promoting leadership. The purpose of this paper is to investigate first-line managers’ experiences of participating in an intervention aimed at strengthening health-promoting leadership. More precisely, the aim is to study what obstacles and prerequisites the intervention have for their learning processes to become health-promoting managers.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative study in Northern Sweden at workplaces in the county council and municipalities was conducted. The data were gathered through individual interviews with 18 participating first-line managers. Inductive-content analysis was used to analyse the data.

Findings

The results identify time for reflection and collegial discussions about leadership as prerequisites for learning about health-promoting leadership. Managers experienced the intervention as a confirmation of the leadership behaviours already gained. However, the health-promoting leadership intervention was seen as a contradiction, since organisational prerequisites to implement WHP measures were perceived to be lacking. The managers were not involved in the planning of the intervention and questioned why the organisation did not involve them more when the educational activities were created.

Originality/value

When the organisation understands how and when its managers learn, what they need and want to learn about WHP, and what they already know, tailored participatory interventions can be facilitated that consider the unique prerequisites for the particular organisation.

Keywords
Health promotion, Social interaction, Learning, Qualitative methods, Intervention
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-37387 (URN)10.1108/HE-02-2019-0004 (DOI)
Funder
AFA Insurance
Available from: 2019-09-26 Created: 2019-09-26 Last updated: 2019-11-14Bibliographically approved
Nordenmark, M., Hagqvist, E. & Vinberg, S. (2019). Sickness Presenteeism among the Self-employed and Employed in Northwestern Europe—The Importance of Time Demands. SH@W Safety and Health at Work, 10(2), 224-228
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sickness Presenteeism among the Self-employed and Employed in Northwestern Europe—The Importance of Time Demands
2019 (English)In: SH@W Safety and Health at Work, ISSN 2093-7911, E-ISSN 2093-7997, Vol. 10, no 2, p. 224-228Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: European policymakers encourage individuals to become self-employed because it is a way to promote innovation and job creation. It can be assumed that health and well-being among the self-employed and managers in small-scale enterprises are particularly crucial in this enterprise group because the smallness of the enterprise makes its members vulnerable. Earlier studies have indicated that the self-employed have a high working pace and work for long and irregular hours, indicating that it can be difficult to stay at home because of sickness. The purpose of this study is to investigate the occurrence of sickness presenteeism among the self-employed in relation to the organizationally employed and to analyze whether any differences can be explained by higher work demands among the self-employed. Methods: The study is based on the fifth European survey on working conditions (2010) and includes the northwestern European countries in the survey. The questions cover a wide range of topics designed to meet the European Union's political needs. The main variables in this study are sickness presenteeism and several indicators of time demands. Results: The results show that the self-employed report a higher level of sickness presenteeism than the employed: 52.4 versus 43.6%. All indicators of time demands are significantly related to the risk for sickness presenteeism, also when controlling for background characteristics. Conclusion: The results confirm that the level of sickness presenteeism is higher among the self-employed and that high time demands are a major explanation to this. 

Keywords
Northwestern Europe, Organizationally employed, Self-employed, Sickness presenteeism, Time demands
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-35825 (URN)10.1016/j.shaw.2019.01.003 (DOI)
Available from: 2019-03-19 Created: 2019-03-19 Last updated: 2019-06-20Bibliographically approved
Hagqvist, E., Toivanen, S. & Vinberg, S. (2019). The gender time gap: Time use among self-employed women and men compared to paid employees in Sweden. Time & Society, 28(2), 680-696
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The gender time gap: Time use among self-employed women and men compared to paid employees in Sweden
2019 (English)In: Time & Society, ISSN 0961-463X, E-ISSN 1461-7463, Vol. 28, no 2, p. 680-696Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this article, the authors set out to study the time use of men and women in Sweden, comparing self-employed and employed individuals. Previous studies indicate that there are reasons to believe that both gendered time use and mechanisms related to time use might differ between the self-employed and employees. Employing time use data, the aim was to study whether there are differences in gendered time use between self-employed individuals and employees in Sweden, and furthermore, which mechanism relates to gendered time use among self-employed individuals and employees. The results show that self-employed men and women distribute their time in a more gender-traditional manner than employees. In addition, relative resources are found to be an important factor related to gendered time use among the self-employed. For employees, gender relations tend to be a mechanism related to gendered time use. The conclusion is that working conditions are important for gendered time use and should be considered in future studies.

Keywords
Employees, gender, relative resources, self-employed, time use
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-29799 (URN)10.1177/0961463X16683969 (DOI)000469875800012 ()
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2012-0615EU, FP7, Seventh Framework Programme, 278173AFA Insurance, 130190
Available from: 2017-01-02 Created: 2017-01-01 Last updated: 2019-08-07Bibliographically approved
Hagqvist, E., Vinberg, S., Tritter, J. Q., Wall, E. & Landstad, B. (2019). The Same, Only Different: Doing Management in the Intersection between Work and Private Life for Men and Women in Small-scale Enterprises. Work, Employment and Society
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Same, Only Different: Doing Management in the Intersection between Work and Private Life for Men and Women in Small-scale Enterprises
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2019 (English)In: Work, Employment and Society, ISSN 0950-0170, E-ISSN 1469-8722Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

The aim of this article is to elucidate how male and female managers of small-scale enterprises in Norway and Sweden relate to and experience the intersection between work and private life. A qualitative content analysis was adopted to explore interviews with 18 managers. The analysis resulted in three primary categories: conflict as a part of the deal, using management to construct balance, and management identity contributing to enrichment. A key theme that emerged was doing management. Both men and women reproduced masculine values in describing their management identities and in explaining how they enacted management. This clear identification was used to legitimate conflict, construct balance and explain the interaction between work and private life as enriching. How the managers enacted gender emerged primarily in how they related to family responsibilities and their feelings of guilt in relation to home and children.

Keywords
enacting management roles, gender and management, small-scale enterprises, work-life balance, work-life conflict, work-life enrichment
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-37642 (URN)10.1177/0950017019871244 (DOI)
Funder
AFA Insurance, 130190
Available from: 2019-11-07 Created: 2019-11-07 Last updated: 2019-11-08Bibliographically approved
Hagqvist, E., Toivanen, S. & Bernhard-Oettel, C. (2018). Balancing Work and Life When Self-Employed: The Role of Business Characteristics, Time Demands, and Gender Contexts. Social Sciences, 7(8), Article ID 139.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Balancing Work and Life When Self-Employed: The Role of Business Characteristics, Time Demands, and Gender Contexts
2018 (English)In: Social Sciences, ISSN 2076-0760, E-ISSN 2076-0760, Vol. 7, no 8, article id 139Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study explores individual and contextual risk factors in relation to work interfering with private life (WIL) and private life interfering with work (LIW) among self-employed men and women across European countries. It also studies the relationship between interference (LIW and WIL) and well-being among self-employed men and women. Drawing on data from the fifth round of the European Working Conditions Survey, a sample of self-employed men and women with active businesses was extracted. After applying multilevel regressions, results show that although business characteristics are important, the most evident risk factor for WIL and LIW is time demands. Both time demands and business characteristics also seem to be important factors in relation to gender differences in level of interference. There is a relationship between well-being and both WIL and LIW, and time demands is again an important factor. Gender equality in the labor market did not relate to level of interference, nor did it affect the relationship between interference and well-being. However, in gender-separated analyses, LIW and LIW interacted with gender equality in the labor market in different ways for women’s and men’s well-being. In conclusion, gender relations are important in interference and how interference relates to well-being.

Keywords
contextual risk factors; gender; individual risk factors; life-work interference; self-employed; well-being; work-life interference
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-34241 (URN)10.3390/socsci7080139 (DOI)
Available from: 2018-08-14 Created: 2018-08-14 Last updated: 2018-08-17Bibliographically approved
Hagqvist, E., Claudia, B.-O. & Toivanen, S. (2018). Balancing work and life when self-employed: the role of gender contexts. In: Gender perspectives on self-employment focusing on work - life balance and working conditions: . Paper presented at Gender, Work and Organization, Sydney, 13-16th June, 2018.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Balancing work and life when self-employed: the role of gender contexts
2018 (English)In: Gender perspectives on self-employment focusing on work - life balance and working conditions, 2018Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-34503 (URN)
Conference
Gender, Work and Organization, Sydney, 13-16th June, 2018
Available from: 2018-09-25 Created: 2018-09-25 Last updated: 2018-10-05Bibliographically approved
Hagqvist, E. & Bernhard-Oettel, C. (2018). Gender Perspectives on Self-Employment Focusing on Work - Life Balance and Working Conditions.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Gender Perspectives on Self-Employment Focusing on Work - Life Balance and Working Conditions
2018 (English)Other (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Political decisions and influences steer individuals toward greater entrepreneurship and self-employment (European Commission, 2004; Verheul, Wennekers, Audretsch, & Thurik, 2002), and for example the increasing share of women in self-employment has been a major development in the world economy since the 1980s (Ahl, 2006). However, knowledge about self-employed individuals’ work and living conditions from a gender perspective is limited (Brush & Brush, 2006), since still today, women are underrepresented in self-employment and also widely ignored in research about self-employment. Additionally, the political agenda concerning self-employment is to a great extent set in a masculine norm (Holmquist & Sundin, 2002). This lead to great gender inequality in self-employment and thus, we need to unravel the unwritten rules and norms related to starting and running one’s own business.Reasons for choosing self-employment may vary but seem to be linked to gender role expectations. Men more often than women cite work-related reasons to become self-employed (Marler & Moen, 2005). Fathers are less likely than mothers to report family reasons to choose self-employment (Hilbrecht & Lero, 2014). Rather, they emphasize employment opportunity, job control and high job satisfaction for choosing self-employment (Ibid.). Mothers of young children choose self-employment as a way to manage the “second shift” and more often than fathers use self-employment as a strategy for work-life balance (Marler & Moen, 2005; Walker & Webster, 2007). However, self-employed individuals seem to experience more conflict between work and family than employees (Johansson Sevä & Öun, 2015; Nordenmark, Vinberg, & Strandh, 2012), even though the variation is large. The phenomenon often labled work-family conflict is ‘a form of inter-role conflict in which the role pressures from work and family domains are mutually incompatible in some respect’ (Greenhaus & Beutell, 1985). There is no cocensus on whether men or women reort higher levels of conflict, but clearly gender norms are important for perceptions of work-family conflict (Hagqvist, 2016). Self-employed individuals, due to more job control, seem to be able to distribute their time better than employees (Nordenmark et al., 2012). Meanwhile, self-employed individuals state that they are always on, constantly developing the company, marketing, seeking new opportunities or worrying about income (Hilbrecht & Lero, 2014). Possibilities to successful combine work and family demands when self-employed also differ depending on economic resources. Self-employed persons who experience dependence on clients and few possibilities to adapt working hours and amount of work experience work-family conflict more often than self-employed persons with low dependency on clients but high autonomy (Annink & den Dulk, 2012; Kunda, Barley, & Evans, 2002). Thus, the benefits gained by choosing self-employment as opposed to organisational employment may be outweighed by costs that can affect the ability to balance work and family (Bunk, Dugan, D’Agostino, & Barnes-Farrell, 2012). Also, the ability to fend of conflicts between work and family is ingrained ingendered constructions and experiences of balance among self-employed individuals (Loscocco, 1997).The fact that self-employment is based on a masculine norms is reflected in studies of working conditions. Working conditions of the self-employed are often characterized by high work load (Stephan & Roesler, 2010) and working more hours per week than the average employee (Eurofound, 2014), especially among men (Hagqvist, Toivanen, & Vinberg, 2016). However, being self-employed has also been related to a situation of high control, in terms of entrepreneurial autonomy and decision making, and the allocation of time and other resources for each of the work tasks (van Gelderen, 2016). Work characteristics function as a recourse for one person and a demand for another (Annink, Den Dulk, & Amorós, 2016). As the typical working conditions for self-employed are masculine (Connell, 2008), it can be stipulated that they are foremost a resource for men and not women. Thus, we need emphasise the role of gender in working conditions among self-employment.Some studies have employed the well-known job control-demand-support model (Karasek & Theorell, 1990) to compare working conditions of the self-employed with wage earners, but results have been contradictory. In some studies, self-employed individuals were found to have more control but also more demands than employees (Nordenmark et al., 2012; Stephan & Roesler, 2010), and these factors explained, at least in part, differences in work-family balance and well-being but also job satisfaction between the self-employed and wage earners. Other studies have discussed the so called “paradox” of the self-employed meaning that although there is clear evidence that the self-employed have more demands, more risks and responsibilities for business success vs failure, and higher work-family conflict, they also often are more satisfied with their job and life in general (Obschonka & Silbereisen, 2015). Several ideas have been brought forward to explain this paradox. For example, it may be that the self-employed are less restricted by organizational regulations or agreements with unions, and thus, there job control differs from that of employees not only in terms of its amount, but also its meaning. This may for example also include employing sub-contractors to do extra work, or being able to work anywhere and at any time. Others suggest that several important factors are overlooked when only studying control and demands, since for instance, it has been found that self-employed with and without employees differ (Johansson Sevä, Vinberg, Nordenmark, & Strandh, 2016), or that conditions vary depending on the economic cycle. The overall financial situation of the business is another salient factor: those in needs for clients and contracts do not find self-employment offers them a lot of freedom and feel forced to work even during free time and vacation days (Annink & den Dulk, 2012). Meanwhile, there is a gender gap in amount and perception of availability in and spillover of work, which is linked to provider status norm (Loscocco, 1997). Clearly, when studying working conditions of the self-employed, the scope has to be extended beyond aspects such as control and demands related to work tasks, to include also questions pertaining to the economic situation (e.g. threat of bankruptcy, business prospects such as security in amounts of clients and contracts) and the overall size and conditions of the business (e.g. number of employees, sector or occupation), but also developments over time (longitudinal studies). Also, perhaps most important, evidence on gendered working conditions in self-employment is still scarce and needs to be put in the spot light.This stream aims to foster a discussion and dialog on the role of gender in self-employment with a focus on working conditions and work-family balance. We welcome multidisciplinary contributions on the following topics:

- Research focusing on motivating factors for men and women to become self-employed.

- Studies of gender identities in self-employment

- Research employing a gender perspective when studying work-family balance for self-employed individuals.

- Studies emphasising the role of gender in working conditions for self-employed individuals.

- Research taking new angles to inquire how working conditions, business circumstances and resources differ for women and men in self-employment.

National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-34506 (URN)
Available from: 2018-09-25 Created: 2018-09-25 Last updated: 2018-09-25Bibliographically approved
Hagqvist, E., Vinberg, S., Landstad, B. & Nordenmark, M. (2018). Is the gap between experienced working conditions and the perceived importance of these conditions related to subjective health?. International Journal of Workplace Health Management, 11(1), 2-15
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Is the gap between experienced working conditions and the perceived importance of these conditions related to subjective health?
2018 (English)In: International Journal of Workplace Health Management, ISSN 1753-8351, E-ISSN 1753-836X, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 2-15Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the gaps between experienced working conditions (WCs) and the perceived importance of these conditions in relation to subjective health in Swedish public sector workplaces.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 379 employees answered questions concerning WCs and health. Nine WC areas were created to measure the gap between the experienced WCs and the perceived importance of each condition. These WC areas were: physical work environment, social relationships, communication, leadership, job control, recognition, self-development, workplace culture and work/life satisfaction. Subjective health was measured using mental ill health, well-being and general health.

Findings

The results indicated relatively large gaps in all nine WC areas. Leadership, physical work environment and work/life satisfaction in particular seemed to be problematic areas with relatively large gaps, meaning that employees have negative experiences of these areas while perceiving these areas as very important. Additionally, all WC areas were significantly related to subjective health, especially regarding mental ill health and well-being; the larger the gaps, the worse the subjective health. The WC areas of work/life satisfaction, self-development, social relationships, communication and recognition had the highest relationships and model fits. This indicates that it is most problematic from an employee’s point of view if there are large gaps within these WC areas.

Originality/value

This study improves the understanding of workplace health by exploring the gap between experienced WCs and the perceived importance of these conditions.

Keywords
Dissonance, Health, Public sector, Sweden, Working conditions
National Category
Other Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-33311 (URN)10.1108/IJWHM-08-2017-0067 (DOI)000427973300001 ()2-s2.0-85044208068 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-03-20 Created: 2018-03-20 Last updated: 2018-05-07Bibliographically approved
Tjulin, Å., Hagqvist, E., Vinberg, S., Eriksson, A. & Landstad, B. (2018). Prerequisites and hindrance in a health-promoting leadership educational intervention: - learning experinces from first line public sector managers. In: Siw Tone Innstrand, Geir Arild Espnes, Bjarne Bruun Jensen (Ed.), Implementing health promotion in the life course: - user involvement in practice and research. Paper presented at 10th IUHPE European Conference and International Forum for Health Promotion Research. Rapportserie Senter for helsefremmende forskning
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Prerequisites and hindrance in a health-promoting leadership educational intervention: - learning experinces from first line public sector managers
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2018 (English)In: Implementing health promotion in the life course: - user involvement in practice and research / [ed] Siw Tone Innstrand, Geir Arild Espnes, Bjarne Bruun Jensen, Rapportserie Senter for helsefremmende forskning , 2018Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Rapportserie Senter for helsefremmende forskning, 2018
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-34565 (URN)978-82-93158-42-4 (ISBN)978-82-93158-43-1 (ISBN)
Conference
10th IUHPE European Conference and International Forum for Health Promotion Research
Available from: 2018-10-01 Created: 2018-10-01 Last updated: 2018-10-01Bibliographically approved
Vinberg, S., Hagqvist, E., Toivanen, S. & Nordenmark, M. (2018). Sickness Presence Among Self-Employed In Western Europe – The Importance Of Psychosocial Working Conditions. In: : . Paper presented at EAWOP Small Group Meeting,"To work, or not to work (when sick), that is the question", Klagenfurt, Austria, July 27-28, 2018.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sickness Presence Among Self-Employed In Western Europe – The Importance Of Psychosocial Working Conditions
2018 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Self-employed is an interesting category when it comes to the phenomenon of sickness presence. To our knowledge, there are few studies of sickness presence among self-employed. In addition, earlier studies have indicated that self-employed have a high working pace and work many and irregular ours (Gunnarsson, Vingård, & Josephson, 2007; Nordenmark, Vinberg & Strandh, 2012; Parasuraman & Simmers, 2001), indicating that it can be problematic and frustrating to stay at home because of illness. Also, self-employed can be seen as a group with low replace ability, which can contribute to high sickness presence (Aronsson & Gustafsson, 2005).  Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to study the occurrence of sickness presence among self-employed in relation to employees, and to analyse if possible differences between the groups can be explained by different psychosocial working conditions related to work demands and time pressure.

European policymakers encourage individuals to become self-employed because it is a way to promote innovation and job-creation (Eurofound, 2017). The proportion of self-employed individuals in the employed labour force in Europe is around 15 percent. Most of the self-employed choose to become self-employed and have good working conditions and job quality. However, around one of five of the self-employed report that they have no alternative for work and they have lower levels of job quality and worse well-being compared to the former group of self-employed (ibid.). Several studies show that the self-employed have very high decision authority and control how work is organised (Hundley, 2001; Stephan & Roesler, 2010). Conversely, most research on the characteristics of the self-employed finds that they report higher job demands and a higher workload than employees do (Nordenmark et al., 2012; Stephan & Roesler, 2010). In general, research show that self-employment is associated with a higher degree of job satisfaction than regular employment (Benz & Frey, 2004; Blanchflower, 2004: Lange, 2012). Research show that high adjustment latitude can contribute to fewer days of health complaints associated with lower rates of sick leave and sickness presence (Gerich, 2014). However, according to a recent review research concerning other health outcomes among self-employed show contradictory results (Stephan, 2017). Although, research about sickness presence has increased during the last decade relatively few organizational scholars are familiar with the concept (Aronsson & Gustafsson, 2005; Johns, 2010). Sickness presence can cause productivity loss and higher organizational costs than sickness absence (Cooper & Dewe, 2008) and increase the risk for illness among individuals (Bergström et al., 2009). It can be assumed that sickness presence and health among self-employed are particularly crucial in this enterprise group due to that the smallness make them vulnerable.

This present study is based on the fifth European survey on working conditions (EWCS) 2015, which has become an established source of information on working conditions and employment in EU Member States. The independent variable – employment type consists of the categories self-employed (with and without employees) and employees. The main independent variable is sickness presence and is measured by the following question: Over the past 12 months did you work when you were sick (1=Yes, 0=No). Several indicators of work demands, time pressure and background variables are used in the analysis.

 

Preliminary study results show that self-employed report a higher level of sickness presence than employed; 52.4 verses 43.6 percent. The mean number of working hours is 43.5 among self-employed and 35.4 among employed. Self-employed have worked in the evenings on average nearly 7 days a month, which is more than twice as many times as for employees. It is also twice as usual that self-employed have worked on a Sunday compared to employees.  Self-employed have on average worked in the free time once or twice a month and employees have on average worked on their free time less often. All the differences between self-employed and employed are clearly significant and indicate a higher level of sickness presence and time pressure among self-employed. In a bivariate analysis, self-employed have a significant higher risk for reporting sickness presence. When controlling for the indicators of time pressure this relationship becomes insignificant. This means when holding the indicators of time pressure on a constant level there is no significant difference between self-employed and employed regarding the risk for reporting sickness presence. The indicator that explains the most of the difference in sickness presence between self-employed and employed is work in free time. All indicators of time pressure are significant related to the risk for sickness presence; the more hours worked and the more often worked in evenings, on Sundays and in the free time, the higher the risk for reporting sickness presence. All these variables are also significant associated to the risk for sickness presence when controlling for background characteristics. Age is significantly associated to sickness presence in the way that a higher age reduces the risk for reporting sickness presence. Women more often report sickness presence than men do. Civil status is not significantly associated to sickness presence. Having children increases the risk for sickness presence and having household economic difficulties increases the risk for reporting sickness presence. The indicators of time pressure contribute most to the level of explained variance in all performed regression models.

The results show that self-employed have a significant higher risk for reporting sickness presence than employed have. This difference is explained by the variables measuring time pressure, which indicates that the self-employed have a higher risk of reporting sickness presence because they experience more time pressure. In the extended paper, we will include other psychosocial working conditions as e.g. job control and consider different clusters of self-employed. The contribution to the small group meeting will be knowledge about sickness presence among different groups of self-employed and implications for researchers and practitioners.

National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-34232 (URN)
Conference
EAWOP Small Group Meeting,"To work, or not to work (when sick), that is the question", Klagenfurt, Austria, July 27-28, 2018
Available from: 2018-08-13 Created: 2018-08-13 Last updated: 2018-08-16Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-3374-268x

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