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Grandien, Christina
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Publications (10 of 19) Show all publications
Johansson, C., Grandien, C. & Strandh, K. (2019). Roadmap for a communication maturity index for organizations—Theorizing, analyzing and developing communication value. Public Relations Review, Article ID 101791.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Roadmap for a communication maturity index for organizations—Theorizing, analyzing and developing communication value
2019 (English)In: Public Relations Review, ISSN 0363-8111, E-ISSN 1873-4537, article id 101791Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

This study employed a constitutive (CCO) communication approach to advance the dynamic concept of communication maturity for the purpose of theorizing, analyzing, and developing communication value on an organizational level. A literature review resulted in six theoretical areas related to communication maturity: understanding, function, organization, prerequisites, competence and practices including assessments of communication. These were analyzed in a qualitative comparative case study including 85 key stakeholders from eleven organizations. Findings illustrated the relevance of the theoretical areas to stakeholders’ perceptions of their respective organizations’ communication maturity. A first version of a Communication Maturity Index including four levels of maturity; immature, emerging, established, and mature is proposed. Based on the qualitative analysis, organizations’ communication maturity levels varied from emerging to mature. Findings of this study are limited to participating organizations and interviewed stakeholders. The CMI can be further developed in quantitative studies to investigate the constitutive role of communication in organizations and to be used in practice to develop higher levels of communication maturity. 

Keywords
CCO theory, Communication index, Communication maturity, Communication value, Organizational development, Stakeholder perceptions
National Category
Media and Communications
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-36676 (URN)10.1016/j.pubrev.2019.05.012 (DOI)
Available from: 2019-07-09 Created: 2019-07-09 Last updated: 2019-07-09Bibliographically approved
Falasca, K., Dymek, M. & Grandien, C. (2019). Social media election campaigning: who is working for whom? A conceptual exploration of digital political labour. Contemporary Social Science, 14(1), 89-101
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Social media election campaigning: who is working for whom? A conceptual exploration of digital political labour
2019 (English)In: Contemporary Social Science, ISSN 2158-2041, E-ISSN 2158-205X, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 89-101Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper posits the notion of digital political labour (DPL) as a rewarding concept for the analysis of political communication and social media. Numerous studies conclude that the engagement, dialogic and social affordances of social media have not yet been realised. But despite the lack of direct interaction, active audiences are, by their own actions in social media, taking part in DPL since audiences do not only receive political messages but contribute significantly with their own user-generated content. The empirical data in this study are from the official Facebook pages of Swedish political parties during the 2014 national election campaign. The results show that most of the communications work is actually performed by the audiences, and not by the parties themselves. This study highlight two important dimensions of DPL where users constitute targets and carriers of advertising as well as audiences whose free labour generates political campaign content.

Keywords
Social media, political communication, election campaign, content analysis
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-32112 (URN)10.1080/21582041.2017.1400089 (DOI)000470259600007 ()
Available from: 2017-11-21 Created: 2017-11-21 Last updated: 2019-07-08Bibliographically approved
Falasca, K., Dymek, M. & Grandien, C. (2017). Exploring Digital Political Labour: political public relations and the exploitation of social media engagement. In: : . Paper presented at The International Communication Association's 67th Annual Conference, Interventions: Communication Research and Practice. San Diego, USA, 25-29 May 2017.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Exploring Digital Political Labour: political public relations and the exploitation of social media engagement
2017 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This paper posits the notion of digital political labour (DPL) as a rewarding concept for the analysis of political public relations and social media. Numerous studies conclude that the engagement, dialogic and social affordances of social media have not yet been realized. But despite the lack of direct interaction, active audiences are, by their own actions in social media, taking part in DPL since audiences do not only receive political messages but contribute significantly with their own user-generated content. This empirical data in this study is from the official Facebook pages of Swedish political parties during the 2014 national election campaign. The results show that most of the communications work is actually performed by the audiences, and not by the parties themselves. This study highlight two important dimensions of DPL where users constitute targets and carriers of advertising as well as audiences whose free labour generates political campaign content.

National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-29888 (URN)DEMICOM (Local ID)DEMICOM (Archive number)DEMICOM (OAI)
Conference
The International Communication Association's 67th Annual Conference, Interventions: Communication Research and Practice. San Diego, USA, 25-29 May 2017
Available from: 2017-01-18 Created: 2017-01-18 Last updated: 2017-06-26Bibliographically approved
Grandien, C. (2017). Pulling together and tearing apart: The occupational branding of public relations and the management of tainted work. Public Relations Inquiry, 6(1), 73-98
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Pulling together and tearing apart: The occupational branding of public relations and the management of tainted work
2017 (English)In: Public Relations Inquiry, ISSN 2046-147X, E-ISSN 2046-1488, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 73-98Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article is a critical exploration of the professionalization of public relations as a struggle or contest over the meaning of work, and it engages with a question about the driving forces behind the long-standing professional project of public relations. The article will use the concepts of ‘dirty work’ and ‘occupational branding’ to address the relation between the role actually performed, normative ideals, and the image of the occupation. The article analyzes op-eds authored by public relations practitioners, scholars, and representatives from professional organizations in newspapers and trade media in order to explore the ways in which the meaning of public relations work is described, contested, and framed, and, consequently, the occupational brand of public relations is formed.

Keywords
Dirty work, identity, occupational branding, professionalization, public relations practitioners
National Category
Media and Communications
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-28577 (URN)10.1177/2046147X16682986 (DOI)000443370500005 ()2-s2.0-85011628835 (Scopus ID)DEMICOM (Local ID)DEMICOM (Archive number)DEMICOM (OAI)
Available from: 2016-08-22 Created: 2016-08-22 Last updated: 2018-09-26Bibliographically approved
Falasca, K. & Grandien, C. (2017). Where you lead we will follow: A longitudinal study of strategic political communication and inter-party relations in election campaigning. Journal of Public Affairs, 17(3), Article ID UNSP e1625.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Where you lead we will follow: A longitudinal study of strategic political communication and inter-party relations in election campaigning
2017 (English)In: Journal of Public Affairs, ISSN 1472-3891, E-ISSN 1479-1854, Vol. 17, no 3, article id UNSP e1625Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The ways in which election campaigns are planned, organized, and conducted have changed considerably during recent decades, and political parties constantly employ new ideas and practices in order to communicate as strategically and effectively as possible. The concept of strategic political communication refers to an organization's purposeful management of information and communication to achieve certain political goals. In this article, we focus on the role of the individual political party in developing election campaigning. The empirical material covers the 2002, 2006, and 2010 Swedish national election campaigns and illustrates how political parties lead and follow each other in the development of strategic political communication. By exploring party agency, this article contributes to the understanding of how ideas and practices of strategic political communication emerge and develop over time in election campaigning.

Keywords
election campaigns, in-depth interviews, political party strategists, qualitative method, strategic political communication
National Category
Media and Communications
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-28578 (URN)10.1002/pa.1625 (DOI)000408136900011 ()2-s2.0-84994051970 (Scopus ID)
Note

First published: 13 September 2016

Available from: 2016-08-22 Created: 2016-08-22 Last updated: 2018-02-28Bibliographically approved
Falasca, K. & Grandien, C. (2016). Leaders and followers - a longitudinal study of inter-party relations in election campaigning.. In: : . Paper presented at International Communication Association's 66th Annual Conference, Communication through Power, Fukuoka, Japan - 9-13 June 2016..
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Leaders and followers - a longitudinal study of inter-party relations in election campaigning.
2016 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-28652 (URN)DEMICOM (Local ID)DEMICOM (Archive number)DEMICOM (OAI)
Conference
International Communication Association's 66th Annual Conference, Communication through Power, Fukuoka, Japan - 9-13 June 2016.
Available from: 2016-08-30 Created: 2016-08-30 Last updated: 2016-09-28Bibliographically approved
Grandien, C. & Johansson, C. (2016). Organizing and disorganizing strategic communication: Discursive institutional change in dynamics in two communication departments. International Journal of Strategic Communication, 10(4), 332-351
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Organizing and disorganizing strategic communication: Discursive institutional change in dynamics in two communication departments
2016 (English)In: International Journal of Strategic Communication, ISSN 1553-118X, E-ISSN 1553-1198, Vol. 10, no 4, p. 332-351Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article explores the institutionalization of strategic communication as a dynamic interplay between macro- and mesolevel discourses. The change processes in the two cases of this study involved both a reorientation of the purpose of the communication function and a physical relocation of the professionals to a centralized department. In both organizations, the transformation toward a strategic management function failed and the communication professionals are now working in ways similar to those before the change was initiated. The analysis illustrates that the institutionalization of strategic communication is effected by organizational-level processes and mechanisms that are not always controlled by communication professionals. The institutionalization of strategic communication is bound by organizational discourses as well as by the actions of communication practitioners and general managers. The study also shows that macro- and mesolevel discourses influence the ways in which change initiatives are translated and strategic communication effected on an organizational level. Hence, institutionalization processes of strategic communication will comply with management trends but can change direction when these trends are challenged. Our results expose that new ideas or practices of strategic communication are translated discursively within organizations in processes of recontextualization, reinterpretation, and reframing. Consequently, new ideas and practices of strategic communication are adjusted to organizational discourses and organizational settings. The translation of a new idea or practice will therefore change the initial meaning of that same idea or practice. For that reason, institutionalization of strategic communication should not be reduced to a unidirectional process but conceptualized as a dynamic interplay between discourses on different levels that moves institutionalization in multiple directions.

National Category
Media and Communications
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-28575 (URN)10.1080/1553118X.2016.1196692 (DOI)2-s2.0-84976418064 (Scopus ID)DEMICOM (Local ID)DEMICOM (Archive number)DEMICOM (OAI)
Available from: 2016-08-22 Created: 2016-08-22 Last updated: 2017-10-12Bibliographically approved
Grandien, C. (2016). Strategic Communication Found in Translation: Practices, Practitioners and Perceptions. (Doctoral dissertation). Sundsvall: Mittuniversitetet
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Strategic Communication Found in Translation: Practices, Practitioners and Perceptions
2016 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

This dissertation seeks to explore how institutional, organizational and individual factors influence the development of strategic communication. The dissertationillustrates how new institutional theory can be applied to address the development of strategic communication as a process that is produced on different interrelated institutional levels. It also shows that multiple levels need to be addressed in order to develop a more comprehensive understanding of strategic communication. Further, it describes how the development of strategic communication is restricted and enabled by societal and organizational discourse in processes that are not always controlled by communication professionals. The dissertation also explores howpopular ideas or successful recipes for strategic communication are spread between organizations in the same field, but are adjusted or translated in order to fit organizational preconditions. The results also highlighthow professionalism is understood differently by communication practitioners depending on the organizational sector they work in and how the institutional embeddedness of communication practitioners influences the ways in which practitioners commit to their occupation.Moreover, it suggests that the inhabited and perceived moral taint that is associated with communication practitioners shapes the professional discourse and hampers the development of a shared occupational identity. Finally, it is suggestedthat knowledge about the development of strategic communication can be found in the translations and local adaptions of new ideas and practices. Insights about the institutionalization of strategic communication might not only be found in realized structures and routines, but in micro changes that happen as the result of local circumstances.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sundsvall: Mittuniversitetet, 2016. p. 197
Series
Mid Sweden University doctoral thesis, ISSN 1652-893X ; 251
National Category
Media and Communications
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-28573 (URN)DEMICOM (Local ID)978-91-88025-81-4 (ISBN)DEMICOM (Archive number)DEMICOM (OAI)
Public defence
2016-09-09, M102, Sundsvall, 14:00 (English)
Supervisors
Note

Vid tidpunkten för disputationen var följande delarbeten opublicerade: delarbete 2 under utgivning, delarbete 3 under utgivning, delarbete 4 inskickat, delarbete 5 accepterat.

At the time of the doctoral defence the following papers were unpublished: paper 2 in press, paper 3 in press, paper 4 submitted, paper 5 accepted.

Available from: 2016-08-22 Created: 2016-08-22 Last updated: 2016-08-23Bibliographically approved
Helgesson, E. & Grandien, C. (2015). On the borderlines of advocacy: Situational professional ethics in the identity construction of public relations consultants. In: Communication Ethics in a Connected World: Research in Public Relations and Organisational Communication: (pp. 215-233). Peter Lang Publishing Group
Open this publication in new window or tab >>On the borderlines of advocacy: Situational professional ethics in the identity construction of public relations consultants
2015 (English)In: Communication Ethics in a Connected World: Research in Public Relations and Organisational Communication, Peter Lang Publishing Group, 2015, p. 215-233Chapter in book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Peter Lang Publishing Group, 2015
National Category
Media and Communications
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-27850 (URN)10.3726/978-3-0352-6555-2 (DOI)2-s2.0-84967016995 (Scopus ID)DEMICOM (Local ID)DEMICOM (Archive number)DEMICOM (OAI)
Note

Book Chapter

Available from: 2016-06-09 Created: 2016-06-09 Last updated: 2017-04-04Bibliographically approved
Falasca, K. & Grandien, C. (2015). Where you lead we will follow: A longitudinal study of strategic political communication in election campaigning. In: : . Paper presented at International Communication Association's 65th Annual Conference, Communication Across the Life Span, San Juan, Puerto Rico, 21-25 May 2015.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Where you lead we will follow: A longitudinal study of strategic political communication in election campaigning
2015 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The different ways in which political parties handle environmental changes and challenges they are faced with is often analyzed as a process of adaption where political parties are under the pressure to adapt in order to keep up with developments because it can render strategic advantages. However, political parties do not operate in a vacuum and have to relate to meso and micro environmental factors as well. Nevertheless, there is little research that focuses on if and how party level and inter-party level factors influence the development of strategic political communication. The purpose of this paper is to explore the importance of party agency and inter-party influence for the development of strategic political communication in election campaigning. The empirical material of this study covers the 2002, 2006, 2010 and 2014 Swedish national election campaigns.

National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-24819 (URN)DEMICOM (Local ID)DEMICOM (Archive number)DEMICOM (OAI)
Conference
International Communication Association's 65th Annual Conference, Communication Across the Life Span, San Juan, Puerto Rico, 21-25 May 2015
Available from: 2015-04-13 Created: 2015-04-13 Last updated: 2015-04-14Bibliographically approved
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