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Söderberg, Siv
Publications (10 of 101) Show all publications
Juuso, P., Skär, L. & Söderberg, S. (2020). Recovery Despite Everyday Pain: Women's experiences of living with whiplash‐associated disorder. Musculoskeletal Care
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Recovery Despite Everyday Pain: Women's experiences of living with whiplash‐associated disorder
2020 (English)In: Musculoskeletal Care, ISSN 1478-2189, E-ISSN 1557-0681Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Introduction

Living with whiplash‐associated disorders (WAD) means living every day under the influence of pain and limitations. As the incidence of WAD and the related intensity of pain are somewhat higher among women than men, the aim of the present study was to describe women's experiences of living with WAD.

Methods

A purposive sample of seven women participated in individual in‐depth qualitative interviews, the transcripts of which were subjected to qualitative content analysis.

Results

The results of the analysis suggested six themes of women's experiences with WAD: living with unpredictable pain; trying to manage the pain; living with limitations; being unable to work as before; needing support and understanding; and learning to live with limitations. The findings showed that unpredictable pain limited women's strength to engage in activities of daily life and be as active as before. Support and understanding were important for their ability to manage changes in their daily lives.

Conclusions

Pain considerably affects the daily lives of women with WAD, particularly by limiting their ability to perform activities and to enjoy their professional and social lives. As women with WAD need support with managing their daily lives, nurses and other healthcare personnel should adopt a person‐centred approach, in order to support such women according to their individual needs and circumstances.

National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-37756 (URN)10.1002/msc.1434 (DOI)
Available from: 2019-11-21 Created: 2019-11-21 Last updated: 2020-01-10Bibliographically approved
Ness, T. M., Söderberg, S. & Hellzèn, O. (2019). ‘Contradictions in having care providers with a South Sami background who speak South Sami’: older South Sami People in Sweden's expectations of home nursing care. Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences
Open this publication in new window or tab >>‘Contradictions in having care providers with a South Sami background who speak South Sami’: older South Sami People in Sweden's expectations of home nursing care
2019 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

The Sami are an indigenous population with multiple languages and dialects living in northern areas of Sweden, Norway, Finland, and the Kola Peninsula. The South Sami population lives in central regions of Sweden and Norway, and consist of about 2000 people. In this study, 56 older South Sami people from Sweden participated. Semi-structured interviews were conducted over the telephone and analysed through qualitative content analysis. The main findings show that older South Sami people's expectations of having care providers with a South Sami background speaking South Sami in home nursing care contain contradictions in and between participants. Participants had different preferences regarding having care providers with a South Sami background speaking South Sami in the future. When providing care to older South Sami people, individual adjustments are of importance, and our study showed that participants had different expectations despite having similar backgrounds. 

Keywords
expectations, home nursing care, qualitative content analysis, South Sami people
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-37304 (URN)10.1111/scs.12747 (DOI)000485751400001 ()31487067 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-09-24 Created: 2019-09-24 Last updated: 2019-11-12Bibliographically approved
Carlsund, Å. & Söderberg, S. (2019). Living With Type 1 Diabetes As Experienced By Young Adults. Nursing Open, 6(2), 418-425
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Living With Type 1 Diabetes As Experienced By Young Adults
2019 (English)In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 418-425Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background. A person’s long-term illness influences many aspects of daily living, for the person affected as well as the family. Living with Type 1 Diabetes in young adulthood raises numerous challenges and concerns.

Design. This study has a qualitative design.

Methods. Semi-structured interviews were performed with 12 young adults living with Type 1 Diabetes. The interviews were analysed using qualitative content analysis.

Results. The analysis revealed contradictory ways of handling the illness, as is illuminated in four categories: Handling the situation, dealing with others, lack motivation and relation to healthcare. Daily life for young adults with Type 1 Diabetes is filled with demanding tasks such as self-administration of insulin, blood glucose tests, and monitoring carb intake to manage blood glucose levels.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2019
Keywords
Experience, nursing, qualitative study, relation, Type 1 Diabetes, young adults.
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-35180 (URN)10.1002/nop2.222 (DOI)000461835600021 ()30918692 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-12-12 Created: 2018-12-12 Last updated: 2019-05-20Bibliographically approved
Segevall, C., Söderberg, S. & Björkman Randström, K. (2019). The Journey Toward Taking the Day for Granted Again: The Experiences of Rural Older People's Recovery From Hip Fracture Surgery. Orthopedic Nursing, 38(6), 359-366
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Journey Toward Taking the Day for Granted Again: The Experiences of Rural Older People's Recovery From Hip Fracture Surgery
2019 (English)In: Orthopedic Nursing, ISSN 0744-6020, E-ISSN 1542-538X, Vol. 38, no 6, p. 359-366Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: A hip fracture is an unexpected, subjective, traumatic experience that affects the person in both physical and emotional ways.

PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to describe rural older people's experiences of recovering after hip fracture surgery.

METHODS: Thirteen individual interviews were conducted with older people. The interview texts were analyzed with qualitative content analysis.

RESULTS: Patients described finding themselves in a new and vulnerable situation, dependent on others for simple everyday chores. They struggled to regain independence while staying positive, convinced that they would recover. Fear of another fall, as well as lack of information, made recovery at home difficult.

CONCLUSION: Older people who experience hip fractures need support during the recovery process. Because recovery begins at the hospital, this study highlight patients' need to participate in recovery planning, as well as the need to have information about what it means to be affected by a hip fracture and how to prevent it from happening again. This study emphasizes that nurses' awareness of patients' need to participate in planning the recovery process is crucial for enabling patients' return to a daily life that is similar to their prefracture life.

National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-37863 (URN)10.1097/NOR.0000000000000608 (DOI)000501318600003 ()31764899 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85075533090 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-12-04 Created: 2019-12-04 Last updated: 2020-01-16Bibliographically approved
Ness, T. M., Söderberg, S. & Hellzèn, O. (2019). ‘The same care providers over time who make individual adjustments and have competence’ Older South Sami People in Sweden's expectations of home nursing care. Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences
Open this publication in new window or tab >>‘The same care providers over time who make individual adjustments and have competence’ Older South Sami People in Sweden's expectations of home nursing care
2019 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

This study is part of a larger research project designed to examine the view of home nursing care from the perspective of older South Sami people in Sweden. In the present study, we present findings from the point of view of their expectations of home nursing care. The Sami are an indigenous population living in northern Sweden, Norway, Finland and the Kola Peninsula, and consist of different Sami people, of which the South Sami population is one. This population consists of approximately 2000 persons living in the central regions of Sweden and Norway. Fifty-six older South Sami people participated in the study. Semi-structured interviews were conducted over the telephone and were analysed using latent content analysis. The main findings show how older South Sami people's expectation for home nursing care contains the same care providers over time, individual adjustments and competent care providers and do not differ from the general Swedish population. Interpersonal interaction is a hallmark of nursing care and other healthcare disciplines. Ideally, interpersonal care is achieved when individual care providers have few care receivers, which promote continuity in care, individual adjustments based on the care receivers individual needs and care providers with professional and relational competence. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Blackwell Publishing Ltd, 2019
Keywords
expectations, home nursing care, qualitative content analysis, South Sami people
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-36705 (URN)10.1111/scs.12719 (DOI)
Available from: 2019-07-10 Created: 2019-07-10 Last updated: 2019-07-10Bibliographically approved
Segevall, C., Björkman Randström, K. & Söderberg, S. (2018). A spider in a broken web: nurses' views on discharge planning for older patients after hip fracture surgery who live in their own homes in rural areas. Open Journal of Nursing, 8(7)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A spider in a broken web: nurses' views on discharge planning for older patients after hip fracture surgery who live in their own homes in rural areas
2018 (English)In: Open Journal of Nursing, ISSN 2162-5336, E-ISSN 2162-5344, Vol. 8, no 7Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction: The in-hospital rehabilitation of patients who have undergone surgery for hip fracture requires a team-based effort, in which nurses play an all-embracing role throughout the patients’ hospital stays. Although discharge planning has been widely studied, little is known about discharge planning from hospitals to homes in rural settings. Aim: To describe nurses’ views on discharge planning for older patients after hip fracture surgery who live in their own homes in rural areas. Methods: A qualitative method was used. Four focus group interviews were conducted with 18 nurses who work at an orthopaedic clinic. The interview texts were analysed with qualitative content analysis. Findings: Nurses expressed that patients needed support from healthcare personnel as well as relatives in order to prepare for life at home. They also expressed that patients were not supported in all aspects of discharge planning because they faced difficulties in having their voices heard. Nurses described that many of those aspects were beyond their own control, which had left them with little to non-ability to influence discharge planning. Findings additionally indicate that discharge planning seems not affected by occurring in rural settings. Conclusions: Although discharge planning is intended to meet the unique wishes and needs of each patient given the realities of existing resources, nurses’ responsibilities in discharge planning are unclear. This study shows an organisation in which healthcare personnel continue to make decisions for patients. Significance for nurses to perform a discharge planning that support patients’ participation seems to be a communication based on shared understanding.

Keywords
Discharge Planning, Nurses, Older Patients, Rural Area, Qualitative Method
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-34769 (URN)10.4236/ojn.2018.87032 (DOI)
Available from: 2018-10-23 Created: 2018-10-23 Last updated: 2018-10-29Bibliographically approved
Rising Holmström, M., Häggström, M. & Söderberg, S. (2018). Being Facilitators in a Challenging Context-school Personnel's Experiences of Caring for Youth with Diabetes Type 1. Journal of Pediatric Nursing: Nursing Care of Children and Families, 43, e114-e119
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Being Facilitators in a Challenging Context-school Personnel's Experiences of Caring for Youth with Diabetes Type 1
2018 (English)In: Journal of Pediatric Nursing: Nursing Care of Children and Families, ISSN 0882-5963, E-ISSN 1532-8449, Vol. 43, p. e114-e119Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: The purpose of the study was to describe school personnel's experiences of caring for youth with diabetes type 1.

Design and Methods: A qualitative design was chosen for this study. Data were collected with individual interviews that were subjected to inductive qualitative content analysis. The sample consisted of 24 school personnel (teachers, principals and school nurses) from Swedish schools. All had experience with youth aged 6 to 18 years old with diabetes type 1.

Results: School personnel experienced caring for youth with diabetes type 1 as “Being facilitators in a challenging context” and described establishing trusting relationships, finding strategies to support self-care, feeling uncertain and incapable in need of education, and dealing with unclear responsibility.

Conclusions: School personnel (teachers, principals and school nurses) are key professionals supporting youth with diabetes type 1 and self-care in school. Lack of education and unclear responsibility created feelings of uncertainty and insecurity for school personnel and a need for mandatory education of school personnel regarding T1DM and self-care, including legislation was identified.

Implications: Mandatory education should be provided for all school personnel regarding diabetes type 1, self-care and current legislation. A liason position in form of a nurse specialist should manage the education. 

Keywords
Diabetes type 1, Principals, Qualitative content analysis, School nurse, Teachers
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-34567 (URN)10.1016/j.pedn.2018.08.007 (DOI)000450921100018 ()30100521 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85051142341 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-10-01 Created: 2018-10-01 Last updated: 2019-08-06Bibliographically approved
Carlsund, Å. & Söderberg, S. (2018). Daily Life with Type 1 Diabetes from the Perspectives of Young Adults and Their Close Relatives. American Journal of Nursing Science, 7(4), 115-120
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Daily Life with Type 1 Diabetes from the Perspectives of Young Adults and Their Close Relatives
2018 (English)In: American Journal of Nursing Science, ISSN 2328-5745, Vol. 7, no 4, p. 115-120Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of this study was to enhance a deeper understanding of daily life as experienced by young adults with Type 1 Diabetes and their close relatives. Young adulthood is commonly considered as an amendment to adult roles. Increased responsibility, such as a long-term illness in young adulthood, might lead to increased stress and anxiety. Type 1 Diabetes involves large obligations related to self-care, and close relatives might play an important role in managing daily life. A hermeneutic study involving interviews with a narrative approach with couples. The hermeneutic analysis revealed that T1D is always unconditionally present in daily life for young adults and their close relatives. Close relatives are important supporters, they have an understanding based on sharing daily life with the young adults with T1D. Young adults and their close relatives highlighted the experiences of being questioned, which in turn threatens the young adults’ integrity.

Keywords
Close Relatives, Couples, Hermeneutic, Type 1 Diabetes, Young Adults
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-34472 (URN)10.11648/j.ajns.20180704.11 (DOI)
Available from: 2018-09-21 Created: 2018-09-21 Last updated: 2018-09-21
Rising Holmström, M., Häggström, M. & Söderberg, S. (2018). Experiences from Parents to Children with Diabetes Type 1.. JSM Health Education Primary Health Care, 3(2), Article ID 1044.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Experiences from Parents to Children with Diabetes Type 1.
2018 (English)In: JSM Health Education Primary Health Care, ISSN 2578-3777, Vol. 3, no 2, article id 1044Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction: When a child is diagnosed with a long-term illness such as diabetes type 1(DT1) parents often find it stressful to give optimum support to the child and to manage the situation especially when the child is in school. Parents experience that the stress to manage life with Diabetes Type 1, means to constant monitor blood glucose, to assist with insulin injections, food intake and physical activity, in order to optimum disease management. Aim: To explore how parents’ of children with Diabetes Type 1 experienced their role as a parent. Material and method: A qualitative design was used and individual interviews were conducted with a purposive sample of 13 parents (10 mothers and 3 fathers) of children with Diabetes Type 1. The interviews were analyzes using qualitative content analysis. Results and conclusions: The analysis resulted in one theme A life change revealing new needs with four subthemes; Struggling with fear and searching for explanations, Learning to manage and getting control of a lifelong illness, Collaboration with school as an important support and Managing the illness influenced work and family finances. Parents in this study struggled for their children at all times, to be the child’s caregiver and to take care of the child’s life in the best possible way. They asked for flexible and continue diabetes education for themselves and for school staff efficient communication and cooperation between parents/families, healthcare and school.

Keywords
Child, Diabetes type 1, Experiences, Parents, Interviews, Qualitative content analysis
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-35212 (URN)
Available from: 2018-12-14 Created: 2018-12-14 Last updated: 2018-12-14Bibliographically approved
Nilsson, Å., Lindberg, B., Söderberg, S. & Olsson, M. (2018). Meanings of participation in hospital care as narrated by patients. European Journal for Person Centered Healthcare, 6(3), 431-437
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Meanings of participation in hospital care as narrated by patients
2018 (English)In: European Journal for Person Centered Healthcare, ISSN 2052-5648, E-ISSN 2052-5656, Vol. 6, no 3, p. 431-437Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: Patient participation is said to be an important factor for patients to experience satisfaction and quality with hospital care. Still, little is known about what participation actually means for patients in the specific context of hospital settings. Therefore, the aim of this study was to elucidate meanings of participation as narrated by patients.

Method: Narrative interviews were conducted during the Autumn of 2013 until the Spring of 2014 and then phenomenological hermeneutically interpreted. In this study, we suggest that the phenomenon of participation in hospital care is experienced by the patient when being a co-creator and seen as an important person in a trustful context.

Results: The results illustrate that an experience of an open, cooperative and coherent environment invites and contributes to participate despite being in a vulnerable situation. The study highlights the importance of responding to each patient as a person, who sometimes has a need to participate actively and sometimes wants to hand over and assume the role of patient in the hospital care setting.

Discussion: Meanings of participation among patients in hospital care can be understood as a phenomenon experienced when being an involved co-creator and seen as an important person in a trustful context. In this study, as well as in previous research it is obvious that participation in hospital care concerns more than being involved in decision-making and receiving information.

Keywords
Clinical communication, dignity, hospital care, lived experiences, narratives, nursing, patients, patient-clinician relationship, patient participation, patient satisfaction, person-centered healthcare, phenomenological hermeneutic interpretation, qualita
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-34952 (URN)10.5750/ejpch.v6i3.1521 (DOI)
Available from: 2018-11-26 Created: 2018-11-26 Last updated: 2019-01-15Bibliographically approved
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