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Söderberg, Siv
Publications (10 of 91) Show all publications
Rising Holmström, M., Häggström, M. & Söderberg, S. (2018). Being Facilitators in a Challenging Context-school Personnel's Experiences of Caring for Youth with Diabetes Type 1. Journal of Pediatric Nursing: Nursing Care of Children and Families
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Being Facilitators in a Challenging Context-school Personnel's Experiences of Caring for Youth with Diabetes Type 1
2018 (English)In: Journal of Pediatric Nursing: Nursing Care of Children and Families, ISSN 0882-5963, E-ISSN 1532-8449Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Purpose: The purpose of the study was to describe school personnel's experiences of caring for youth with diabetes type 1. Design and Methods: A qualitative design was chosen for this study. Data were collected with individual interviews that were subjected to inductive qualitative content analysis. The sample consisted of 24 school personnel (teachers, principals and school nurses) from Swedish schools. All had experience with youth aged 6 to 18 years old with diabetes type 1. Results: School personnel experienced caring for youth with diabetes type 1 as “Being facilitators in a challenging context” and described establishing trusting relationships, finding strategies to support self-care, feeling uncertain and incapable in need of education, and dealing with unclear responsibility. Conclusions: School personnel (teachers, principals and school nurses) are key professionals supporting youth with diabetes type 1 and self-care in school. Lack of education and unclear responsibility created feelings of uncertainty and insecurity for school personnel and a need for mandatory education of school personnel regarding T1DM and self-care, including legislation was identified. Implications: Mandatory education should be provided for all school personnel regarding diabetes type 1, self-care and current legislation. A liason position in form of a nurse specialist should manage the education. 

Keywords
Diabetes type 1, Principals, Qualitative content analysis, School nurse, Teachers
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-34567 (URN)10.1016/j.pedn.2018.08.007 (DOI)
Note

Available online 10 August 2018

Available from: 2018-10-01 Created: 2018-10-01 Last updated: 2018-10-01Bibliographically approved
Carlsund, Å. & Söderberg, S. (2018). Daily Life with Type 1 Diabetes from the Perspectives of Young Adults and Their Close Relatives. American Journal of Nursing Science, 7(4), 115-120
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Daily Life with Type 1 Diabetes from the Perspectives of Young Adults and Their Close Relatives
2018 (English)In: American Journal of Nursing Science, ISSN 2328-5745, Vol. 7, no 4, p. 115-120Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of this study was to enhance a deeper understanding of daily life as experienced by young adults with Type 1 Diabetes and their close relatives. Young adulthood is commonly considered as an amendment to adult roles. Increased responsibility, such as a long-term illness in young adulthood, might lead to increased stress and anxiety. Type 1 Diabetes involves large obligations related to self-care, and close relatives might play an important role in managing daily life. A hermeneutic study involving interviews with a narrative approach with couples. The hermeneutic analysis revealed that T1D is always unconditionally present in daily life for young adults and their close relatives. Close relatives are important supporters, they have an understanding based on sharing daily life with the young adults with T1D. Young adults and their close relatives highlighted the experiences of being questioned, which in turn threatens the young adults’ integrity.

Keywords
Close Relatives, Couples, Hermeneutic, Type 1 Diabetes, Young Adults
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-34472 (URN)10.11648/j.ajns.20180704.11 (DOI)
Available from: 2018-09-21 Created: 2018-09-21 Last updated: 2018-09-21
Skär, L. & Söderberg, S. (2018). Patients' complaints regarding healthcare encounters and communication. Nursing Open, 5(2), 224-232
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Patients' complaints regarding healthcare encounters and communication
2018 (English)In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 224-232Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim: To explore patient‐reported complaints regarding communication and healthcare encounters and how these were responded to by healthcare professionals.

Design: A retrospective and descriptive design was used in a County Council in northern part of Sweden. Both quantitative and qualitative methods were used.

Methods: The content of 587 patient‐reported complaints was included in the study. Descriptive statistical analysis and a deductive content analysis were used to investigate the content in the patient‐reported complaints.

Results: The results show that patients’ dissatisfaction with encounters and communication concerned all departments in the healthcare organization. Patients were most dissatisfied when they were not met in a professional manner. There were differences between genders, where women reported more complaints regarding their dissatisfaction with encounters and communication compared with men. Many of the answers on the patient‐reported complaints lack a personal apology and some of the patients failed to receive an answer to their complaints.

Keywords
communication, nurse-patient relationship, patient advisory committee, patient complaints, quality of health care
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-32770 (URN)10.1002/nop2.132 (DOI)000428455600014 ()29599998 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-01-30 Created: 2018-01-30 Last updated: 2018-05-08Bibliographically approved
Skär, L. & Söderberg, S. (2018). The importance of ethical aspects when implementing eHealth services in healthcare: a discussion paper. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 74(5), 1043-1050
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The importance of ethical aspects when implementing eHealth services in healthcare: a discussion paper
2018 (English)In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 74, no 5, p. 1043-1050Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim

The aim of this paper is to discuss the importance of ethical aspects when implementing eHealth services in healthcare.

Background

Challenges in healthcare today include a growing older population and, as a consequence, an increased need for healthcare services. One possible solution is the use of eHealth services.

Design

Discussion paper.

Data sources

Research literature published from 2000 - 2017 in CINAHL, PubMed and Scopus.

Implications for nursing

Implementing eHealth services in healthcare involves ethical challenges where different technologies can solve different problems in different ways. eHealth services should therefore be developed and implemented based on the patient's specific needs and conditions for use and in accordance with the healthcare professionals’ presumption to provide high quality care.

Conclusion

To preserve patients’ integrity, dignity and autonomy, healthcare professionals must include ethical aspects when implementing and using eHealth services in healthcare. Healthcare professionals have to take responsibility for the eHealth services introduced, explaining why and how they are implemented based on a person-centered approach. More knowledge is needed about ethical aspects when implementing eHealth services to improve the quality of care.

Keywords
autonomy, dignity, eHealth, ethical aspects, health care, implementation, nursing, participation, person-centred care, quality care
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-31944 (URN)10.1111/jan.13493 (DOI)000430121900007 ()29105151 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85045526044 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-10-24 Created: 2017-10-24 Last updated: 2018-05-16Bibliographically approved
Forslund, A.-S., Jansson, J.-H., Lundblad, D. & Söderberg, S. (2017). A second chance at life: People's lived experiences of surviving out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, 31(4), 878-886
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A second chance at life: People's lived experiences of surviving out-of-hospital cardiac arrest
2017 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 31, no 4, p. 878-886Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background

There is more to illuminate about people's experiences of surviving out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) and how such an event affects people's lives over time.

Aims

This study aimed to elucidate meanings of people's lived experiences and changes in everyday life during their first year after surviving OHCA.

Methods

A qualitative, longitudinal design was used. Eleven people surviving OHCA from northern Sweden agreed to participate and were interviewed 6 and 12 months after the event. A phenomenological hermeneutic interpretation was used to analyse the transcribed texts.

Findings

The structural analysis resulted in two themes: (i) striving to regain one's usual self and (ii) a second chance at life, and subthemes (ia) testing the body, (ib) pursuing the ordinary life, (ic) gratitude for help to survival, (iia) regaining a sense of security with one's body, (iib) getting to know a new self, and (iic) seeking meaning and establishing a future.

Conclusion

To conclude, we suggest that people experienced meanings of surviving OHCA over time as striving to regain their usual self and getting a second chance at life. The event affected them in many ways and resulted in a lot of emotions and many things to think about. Participants experienced back-and-forth emotions, when comparing their present lives to both their lives before cardiac arrest and those lives they planned for the future. During their first year, participants’ daily lives were still influenced by ‘being dead’ and returning to life. As time passed, they wanted to resume their ordinary lives and hoped for continued lives filled with meaning and joyous activities.

Keywords
life experiences, out-of-hospital, cardiac arrest, myocardial infarction, qualitative research, survival
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-29134 (URN)10.1111/scs.12409 (DOI)000416413000026 ()28156015 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85035357381 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-10-26 Created: 2016-10-26 Last updated: 2018-01-25Bibliographically approved
Johansson, A., Lindberg, I. & Söderberg, S. (2017). Healthcare personnel's experiences using video consultation in primary healthcare in rural areas. Primary Health Care Research and Development, 18(1), 73-83
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Healthcare personnel's experiences using video consultation in primary healthcare in rural areas
2017 (English)In: Primary Health Care Research and Development, ISSN 1463-4236, E-ISSN 1477-1128, Vol. 18, no 1, p. 73-83Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background Patients living in rural areas often need to travel long distances for access to specialist care. To increase access to specialist care, video consultation between patients in primary healthcare and specialist care has been used. In order for this new method to be developed and used to the fullest, it is important to understand healthcare personnel's experiences with this intervention. Objective The aim of this study was to describe healthcare personnel's experiences using video consultation in their work in primary healthcare. Method A mixed methods design was used, and the data were analysed using qualitative and quantitative analysis methods. Interviews were conducted with eight general practitioners and one district nurse, all of whom had conducted a video consultation with a patient and a specialist physician or a cardiac specialist nurse. After each video consultation, the participants completed a consultation report/questionnaire. Results Healthcare personnel considered video consultation to provide quicker access to specialist care for the patient, and greater security when the video consultation encounter was conducted at their own primary healthcare centre. They considered video consultation an opportunity to provide education and for the patients to ask questions. Conclusion Video consultation is a satisfactory tool for healthcare personnel, and the technology is a new, useful method, especially for the district nurses. Further, video consultation is an opportunity for healthcare personnel to learn. However, for it to work as an accepted method, the technology must function well and be user friendly. It must also be clear that it is beneficial for the patients and the healthcare personnel.

Keywords
healthcare personnel, mixed methods, rural area, specialist care, video consultation
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-28654 (URN)10.1017/S1463423616000347 (DOI)000396373000008 ()27640522 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84988358554 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-08-30 Created: 2016-08-30 Last updated: 2017-04-24Bibliographically approved
Lindberg, I., Lindberg, B. & Söderberg, S. (2017). Patients' and healthcare personnels' experiences of health coaching with on-line self-management in the ReNewing health project. International Journal of Telemedicine and Applications, Article ID 9306192.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Patients' and healthcare personnels' experiences of health coaching with on-line self-management in the ReNewing health project
2017 (English)In: International Journal of Telemedicine and Applications, ISSN 1687-6415, E-ISSN 1687-6423, article id 9306192Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background. Telehealth applications have shown positive effects for people with chronic conditions and their awareness of health. Objective. To describe patients’ and healthcare personnel’s experiences of using health coaching with online self-management in primary health care. Method. A pragmatic randomised controlled trial was conducted. Patients in the intervention group measured and reported medical parameters such as blood pressure, blood glucose, prothrombin complex (PK) values, and 2-channel ECG. Data were collected through a questionnaire, individual interviews with patients, and focus group discussions with healthcare personnel. The questionnaire was analysed using statistics; texts from interviews and focus groups were analysed using content analysis. Findings. Patients were satisfied and believed that the intervention had enhanced their care and increased accessibility without causing concerns about privacy. Although being positive, patients commented the lack of support and feedback from healthcare personnel. Healthcare personnel regarded the intervention valuable for the patients’ abilities to perform self-management healthcare tasks but preferred that patients did so without them supporting the patients. Conclusion. Patients expressed satisfaction and acceptance regarding the use of the application. It seems that healthcare personnel are convinced about the benefits for patients and the potential for the intervention but are not convinced about its benefits for healthcare organisations.

National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-32436 (URN)10.1155/2017/9306192 (DOI)000422793800001 ()2-s2.0-85042633389 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-12-13 Created: 2017-12-13 Last updated: 2018-03-14Bibliographically approved
Lindberg, I., Torbjörnsen, A., Söderberg, S. & Ribu, L. (2017). Telemonitoring and health counseling for self-management support of patients with type 2 diabetes: A randomized controlled trial. JMIR Diabetes, 2(1)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Telemonitoring and health counseling for self-management support of patients with type 2 diabetes: A randomized controlled trial
2017 (English)In: JMIR Diabetes, ISSN 2371-4379, Vol. 2, no 1Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: The prevalence of diabetes is increasing among adults globally, and there is a need for new models of health care delivery. Research has shown that self-management approaches encourage persons with chronic conditions to take a primary role in managing their daily care.

Objective: The objective of this study was to investigate whether the introduction of a health technology-supported self-management program involving telemonitoring and health counseling had beneficial effects on glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), other clinical variables (height, weight, body mass index, blood pressure, blood lipid profile), and health-related quality of life (HRQoL), as measured using the Short Form Health Survey (SF-36) version 2 in patients with type 2 diabetes.

Methods: This was a pragmatic randomized controlled trial of patients with type 2 diabetes. Both the control and intervention groups received usual care. The intervention group also participated in additional health promotion activities with the use of the Prescribed Healthcare Web application for self-monitoring of blood glucose and blood pressure. About every second month or when needed, the general practitioner or the diabetes nurse reviewed the results and the health care activity plan.

Results: A total of 166 patients with type 2 diabetes were randomly assigned to the intervention (n=87) or control (n=79) groups. From the baseline to follow-up, 36 patients in the intervention group and 5 patients in the control group were lost to follow-up, and 2 patients died. Additionally, HbA1c was not available at baseline in one patient in the intervention group. A total of 122 patients were included in the final analysis after 19 months. There were no significant differences between the groups in the primary outcome HbA1c level (P=.33), and in the secondary outcome HRQoL as measured using SF-36. A total of 80% (67/87) of the patients in the intervention group at the baseline, and 98% (47/50) of the responders after 19-month intervention were familiar with using a personal computer (P=.001). After 19 months, nonresponders (ie, data from baseline) reported significantly poorer mental health in social functioning and role emotional subscales on the SF-36 (P=.03, and P=.01, respectively).

Conclusions: The primary outcome HbA1c level and the secondary outcome HRQoL did not differ between groups after the 19-month follow-up. Those lost to follow-up reported significantly poorer mental health than did the responders in the intervention group.

National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-31680 (URN)10.2196/diabetes.6884 (DOI)
Available from: 2017-09-27 Created: 2017-09-27 Last updated: 2017-09-28Bibliographically approved
Rising Holmström, M., Häggström, M., Audulv, Å., Junehag, L., Coyne, I. & Söderberg, S. (2017). To integrate and manage diabetes in school: Youth's expereinces of living with Type 1 diabetes in relation to school- a qualitative study. International Diabetes Nursing, 14(2-3)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>To integrate and manage diabetes in school: Youth's expereinces of living with Type 1 diabetes in relation to school- a qualitative study
Show others...
2017 (English)In: International Diabetes Nursing, ISSN 2057-3316, E-ISSN 2057-3324, Vol. 14, no 2-3Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In Sweden, each year approximately 700 children develop Type 1 diabetes. Living with the illness is a challenge for youth and requires adjustments to lifestyle, and to manage school. The aim was to describe youths’ experiences of living with Type 1 diabetes in relation to school. A qualitative research design was used and interviews were performed with eight girls and five boys with Type 1 diabetes. The interviews were subjected to qualitative content analysis. Three themes were identified: to be friends with the diabetes, striving for normality and receiving support from others. Results showed a need to increase the understanding of T1D and diabetic competence within the Swedish school system and knowledge of youths’ own experiences is vital in this work. Living with T1D was a struggle for normality, independency and the youth needed to be friends with diabetes to handle everyday self-management. Although there are demanding life and school circumstances, it eventually becomes possible for the youth to handle the illness and to integrate and manage diabetes in school.

Keywords
Type 1 diabetes, experiences, qualitative content analysis, school, self-management, youth
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-32368 (URN)10.1080/20573316.2017.1375599 (DOI)
Projects
Diabetes i skolan DiS
Available from: 2017-12-11 Created: 2017-12-11 Last updated: 2018-09-19Bibliographically approved
Lindgren, E., Söderberg, S. & Skär, L. (2016). Being a parent to a young adult with mental illness in transition to adulthood. Issues in Mental Health Nursing, 37(2), 98-105
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Being a parent to a young adult with mental illness in transition to adulthood
2016 (English)In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 37, no 2, p. 98-105Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Parents of young adults with mental illness may face a continued demand for support, even though their children have reached the age of majority. The aim of this study was to explore relatives experiences of parenting a young adult with mental illness in transition to adulthood. Individual interviews were conducted and analysed according to Grounded Theory. The results showed that relatives experienced powerlessness and a sense of inescapable duty with limited possibilities to be relieved. With a family nursing approach, relatives can be supported and, when the young adults needs of care are met, they can be relieved from their burden of responsibility.

National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-26213 (URN)10.3109/01612840.2015.1092621 (DOI)000370619400006 ()2-s2.0-84958174406 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2015-11-04 Created: 2015-11-04 Last updated: 2017-12-01Bibliographically approved
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