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Publications (10 of 27) Show all publications
Petridou, E., Danielsson, E., Olofsson, A., Lundgren, M. & Große, C. (2019). If Crisis or War Comes: A Study of Risk Communication of Eight European Union Member States. Journal of International Crisis and Risk Communication Research, 2(2), 207-232
Open this publication in new window or tab >>If Crisis or War Comes: A Study of Risk Communication of Eight European Union Member States
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2019 (English)In: Journal of International Crisis and Risk Communication Research, ISSN 2576-0025, Vol. 2, no 2, p. 207-232Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

How do European Union (EU) member states communicate risks to their citizens? In this study, we define risk communication as the information provided by different levels of government to citizens regarding possible future crises to which the general public might be subjected. We seek to answer the following questions: Are there any patterns in the risk communication strategies among EU member states in terms of the sender of information, the message conveyed, the method used, and the intended audience? Finally, to what extent is the state involved in ensuring the safety of its citizens? To tackle these questions, we examine the risk communication strategy of eight countries: Sweden, Finland, Germany, England, France, Estonia, Greece, and Cyprus. Our data consist of governmental web sites, publications, campaigns, and other modes of communication, such as videos posted on YouTube, with questions centering on institutional actors, methods of delivery, content, and effectiveness. We find that the institutional architecture of risk communication aligns with the broad administrative system of each member state. Countries tend to focus on risks that are specific to their context, with Sweden and, to a lesser extent, Germany having a special focus on consequences and providing guidelines to the public on how to survive for a certain period of time in the absence of the state. Especially in Sweden, though the state is a salient actor in risk communication through the dissemination of information at the agency level, the state retreats while urging the resilient citizen to take control of his or her own crisis management.

Keywords
Risk communication; comparative studies; European politics; resilience; public policy
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-37688 (URN)10.30658/jicrcr.2.2.3 (DOI)
Available from: 2019-11-15 Created: 2019-11-15 Last updated: 2019-11-19Bibliographically approved
Kolmodin, S., Lundgren, M. & Andersson, C. (2019). Preparing for climate change and hazards: Individual houseowners trust in local authorities and private entrepreneurs. International Journal of Disaster Risk Reduction, 41, Article ID 101277.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Preparing for climate change and hazards: Individual houseowners trust in local authorities and private entrepreneurs
2019 (English)In: International Journal of Disaster Risk Reduction, E-ISSN 2212-4209, Vol. 41, article id 101277Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A changing climate that entails a growing number of hazards poses a challenge to communities across the world. Particularly exploited areas in mountain and maritime zones have become increasingly vulnerable. Homeowners in such areas has been identified as key actors in the pursuit of robust communities, though large groups of people tend to trust mainly in the risk management of local authorities. In order to achieve a better understanding in how individual homeowners address risks related to their properties and the ways in which they put their trust in the risk management in different actors, not only public authorities, we conducted interviews with homeowners in Sweden's largest ski resort, Åre, in recent years affected by an increasing number of landslides. The empirical findings show that households have different targets of trust during different stages of a crisis, which also aligns with previous research. While the respondents worried about the overall development in the area, their main concerns were related to their properties and how a harsher climate would affect their economic value. The homeowners furthermore expressed that their trust in the municipality and the local entrepreneur that runs the ski resort is low when it comes to crisis management. Yet rural populations in general are used to handle crises on their own, as assistance from authorities usually takes longer time. It is thus important that the municipality and local entrepreneurs assume responsibility not to jeopardize sustainability in future exploitations in the area in order to establish trust in relation to local homeowners. 

Keywords
Climate change, Hazards, Homeowners, Households, Risk management, Sustainability, Trust
National Category
Sociology (excluding Social Work, Social Psychology and Social Anthropology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-37130 (URN)10.1016/j.ijdrr.2019.101277 (DOI)000504924200033 ()2-s2.0-85071268105 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-09-06 Created: 2019-09-06 Last updated: 2020-01-16Bibliographically approved
Lundgren, M. (2018). Micro-Level Research in the Unresolved Conflict Zone: Methodological and Ethical Implications. In: : . Paper presented at Association for Nationalities Studies World Convention 2018, New York, May 3-4 2018.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Micro-Level Research in the Unresolved Conflict Zone: Methodological and Ethical Implications
2018 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

In this presentation I will draw on several years of explorative research into everyday lives in Abkhazia. While the vast majority of research on the de facto states is focused on the frozen conflicts and their resolution, their juridical status as well as both internal and external political relations; examples of scholarly studies analyzing micro level aspects of everyday life inside these areas are few. We can imagine that living in a de facto state has its specific characteristics related to consequences deriving from as well unresolved conflict as economic and political isolation. Knowledge about everyday life in Abkhazia originates mainly from online news media and NGO reports. In the latter, economic hardship, the lack of personal security and arbitrary treatment by local authorities is stressed as the most common threats to human wellbeing. Furthermore, these reports often focus on human rights, an important but in effect not particularly analytical approach.  

This presentation therefore aims to offer a critical alternative to news and NGO reporting by exploring how unrecognition and unresolved conflict are embodied in the everyday life experiences of Abkhazian residents. The empirical material derives from fieldwork in Gagra, Gal(i) and Sukhum(i) in 2014, 2015 and 2017 and includes interviews with respondents from the major ethnic groups in Abkhazia. I suggest that through the use of intersectional risk theory we can discern how lingering tensions and structural inequalities between different groups result in, among other things, differing patterns of mobility and unequal life chances. Moreover this presentation addresses the very conditions for doing research that involves ordinary residents inside Abkhazia and that also implies both ethical and methodological challenges, along with difficulties of access.

Keywords
Caucasus, Abkhazia, ethics, risk
National Category
Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-37521 (URN)
Conference
Association for Nationalities Studies World Convention 2018, New York, May 3-4 2018
Note

Part of the roundtable: 

Better Within, Across or Apart?: Making Sense of the Caucasus as a Region

Available from: 2019-10-11 Created: 2019-10-11 Last updated: 2019-10-29Bibliographically approved
Lundgren, M. & Lidén, G. (2018). Not in my backyard: Integration and xenophobia in a local housing project in Östersund. In: : . Paper presented at 27th Annual Conference of the Society for Risk Analysis Europe, Östersund, June 18-20, 2018.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Not in my backyard: Integration and xenophobia in a local housing project in Östersund
2018 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-34038 (URN)
Conference
27th Annual Conference of the Society for Risk Analysis Europe, Östersund, June 18-20, 2018
Projects
Hållbart Samhällsbyggande
Funder
European Regional Development Fund (ERDF)
Available from: 2018-06-29 Created: 2018-06-29 Last updated: 2018-07-03Bibliographically approved
Danielsson, E., Petridou, E., Lundgren, M., Olofsson, A., Große, C. & Röslmaier, M. (2018). Risk Communication: A Comparative Study of Eight EU Countries. MSB
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Risk Communication: A Comparative Study of Eight EU Countries
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2018 (English)Report (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

How do EU member states communicate risks to their citizens? In this study, we define risk communication as the information provided by different levels of government to citizens regarding possible future crises. The questions serving as departure points for this study are as follows: How is the administrative system for risk communication set up in the countries studied? How the different risk communication campaigns are (provided that they exist) embedded in the larger administrative context? How is risk communication strategy formulated in each country and what kind of threats are emphasized? In order to tackle these questions, we examine the risk communication strategy of eight countries: Sweden, Finland, Germany, England, France, Estonia, Greece and Cyprus. Our data consist of governmental web sites, publications, campaigns, as well as other modes of communication, such as videos posted on YouTube, with questions centering on institutional actors, methods of delivery, content, and effectiveness. We acknowledge that risk communication aims at supporting vulnerable populations and evening out imbalances, but at the same time we flesh out the power dimension of risk. In our analysis, we search for reproduction of norms and social inequality in risk communication practices. The results show that some patterns emerge regarding the way different EU countries convey information to the public, but they do not hold strictly to geography or administrative system. Digital media are the foremost vehicle of risk communication and the message generally conveyed is geared towards traditional, middle class households with the main language of the country as their first language. Volunteer organizations are present in all the countries in question, though not at the same degree. The conveyance of “self-protection” guidelines implicitly places the responsibility of protection to the individual. The results also show that in some countries, materiality has become more prevalent than the social dimension of risk in the message the public sector conveys, and that there is a move from focusing on risk to focusing on security.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MSB, 2018. p. 71
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-35027 (URN)978-91-7383-868-9 (ISBN)
Funder
Swedish Civil Contingencies Agency
Available from: 2018-12-03 Created: 2018-12-03 Last updated: 2019-01-14Bibliographically approved
Lundgren, M. (2018). Riskscapes: Strategies and practices along the Georgian-Abkhazian boundary line and inside Abkhazia. Journal of Borderlands Studies, 33(4), 637-654
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Riskscapes: Strategies and practices along the Georgian-Abkhazian boundary line and inside Abkhazia
2018 (English)In: Journal of Borderlands Studies, ISSN 0886-5655, E-ISSN 2159-1229, Vol. 33, no 4, p. 637-654Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The Georgian–Abkhazian war in 1992–1993 caused the forced displacement of around half of the population of the former autonomous Abkhazian republic. Over 200,000 of them were ethnic Georgians, out of whom at least 46,000 have returned mainly to southern Abkhazia. Abkhazia today functions as a de facto independent state, and the Russian–Abkhazian border control along the administrative boundary line between Abkhazia and Georgia poses an obstacle to young people from returnee families who are studying in Georgia proper and want to visit their families in Abkhazia. This study focuses on young migrants navigating the consequences of war and ethnic conflict on human mobility in the border area. Drawing on ethnographic fieldwork and five in-depth qualitative interviews with young people aged 18–25 years, the aim is to examine the strategies and practices that the young respondents employ to cross the border. To reach their homes in Abkhazia they need to navigate through riskscapes—landscapes or physical settings embedded with multiple layers of risk. Depending on their social positions (gender, ethnicity, citizenship, age) different riskscapes are unfolded. To handle riskscapes these young people adopt preventive measures; they change routes and behavior.

Keywords
Georgia, Abkhazia, Youth, Border, Risk, Riskscapes
National Category
Sociology (excluding Social Work, Social Psychology and Social Anthropology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-28667 (URN)10.1080/08865655.2017.1300778 (DOI)000457583100008 ()2-s2.0-85016307939 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-09-01 Created: 2016-09-01 Last updated: 2019-03-18Bibliographically approved
Lundgren, M. (2017). Rasism mot samer på SVT Jämtlands Facebooksida. Östersund
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Rasism mot samer på SVT Jämtlands Facebooksida
2017 (Swedish)Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
Abstract [sv]

Den 16 mars öppnade utställningen ”Vad ska bort – främlingsfientlighet, rasism eller kolonialism?” på församlingshemmet i Funäsdalen i samband med de samiska fest- och kulturdagarna 2017. 

I utställningen, som satts samman av stiftelsen Gaaltije Sydsamiskt kulturcentrum, åskådliggörs den samiska situationen i det svenska kolonialsamhället i dag, och baseras på skildringar från traditionella massmedier, sociala medier samt styrregler och andra officiella dokument och skrifter. 

Den visar många exempel på den rasism som direkt riktas mot samer i dag. Samtidigt pågår normalisering av rasism i medierna. 

Ett färskt exempel är när SVT Jämtland på eftermiddagen 15 mars publicerade ett inslag på sin Facebooksida som handlade om problemen för Tossåsens sameby med vargar i renbeteslandet. 

Nästan i samma stund som inslaget publicerats började rasistiska kommentarer mot samer förekomma i kommentarsfältet. 

Vi är kritiska till SVT:s redaktörskap när sådana kommentarer tillåts ligga uppe, då administratören för FB-sidan inte snabbt gick in och markerade vilka regler som gäller för deras kommentarsfält, på ett sätt så att rasistiska kommentarer kan stoppas. 

Detta är ett exempel på normalisering av rasism mot samer i statliga medier. 

Efter att kommentarerna legat kvar på sidan i cirka ett dygn uppmärksammade vi den ansvariga utgivaren på tonen i kommentarsfälten. Några av de grövre rasistiska kommentarerna togs bort, men nedvärderande kommentarer mot samer ligger fortsatt kvar. 

Som vi ser det finns det stor anledning för SVT Jämtland att, utifrån kunskap om hur rasism normaliseras i samhället, kritiskt granska sitt eget utgivar- och administratörsansvar.

Angelika Sjöstedt Landén 

Minna Lundgren

lektorer och forskare vid avdelningen för samhällsvetenskap, Mittuniversitetet

Place, publisher, year, pages
Östersund: , 2017
Keywords
rasism, samer, media
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-31101 (URN)
Available from: 2017-06-30 Created: 2017-06-30 Last updated: 2018-01-19Bibliographically approved
Lundgren, M. (2017). Welcome Refugees? Syrian Repatriates in Abkhazia. In: : . Paper presented at 23rd Annual World Convention of the Association for the Study of Nationalities (ASN), New York, May 3-5, 2017.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Welcome Refugees? Syrian Repatriates in Abkhazia
2017 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

At the time when Abkhazia was incorporated into the Russian Empire in the 1860s many Muslim Abkhaz, Muhaiirs, were driven out and found refuge notably in Turkey but also in Syria and Jordan. These diaspora Abkhaz have been subject to a repatriation campaign initiated by the Abkhazian de facto authorities in the aftermath of the war against Georgia in 1992-93 that radically altered the demographic situation of the territory. More than half of the population fled the territory, among them most of the ethnic Georgians. The most recent population census, the result of which have been questioned, gives that by early 2011, more than 50 per cent of the 240 000 people living in Abkhazia are ethnic Abkhaz. Yet the Abkhazian authorities de facto authorities aim to retain and strengthen the position of dominant ethnicity through the demographic change that migration has created to their benefit and by encouraging repatriation of ethnic Abkhaz living in other parts of the world. While some diasporic Abkhaz resettled in Abkhazia during the 1990s, economic hardship and the difficulties to integrate within the war torn Abkhazian society, led to a repeated emigration from their ancestral homeland. However the current situation of war and turmoil in Syria has seen a new influx of people with Abkhaz roots, accompanied by a repatriation and integration programme consisting of accommodation, language classes, food and monthly monetary allowances.

 

Whereas Abkhazian authorities view these people as repatriates, they are considered refugees in accordance with international humanitarian law. While many Western countries slightly reluctantly accept Syrian refugees and asylum seekers into their territories, the Abkhazian authorities officially views the act of welcoming Syrian refugees with Abkhazian ancestry as both an act of solidarity and a homecoming. People claiming an ethnic Abkhaz identity are generally accepted as Abkhazian citizens. But are these Syrian Abkhaz actually allowed to “belong” among other Abkhazian citizens? What are the foundations of their experiences of belonging in Abkhazia? This study builds on interviews with Abkhazian officials, NGO workers, local Abkhazians and Syrian repatriates living in or around the Abkhazian capital Sukhum(i). Drawing on Nira Yuval-Davis’ theories on the politics of belonging as situated temporally, spatially and intersectionally, the respondents’ views on and experiences of belonging in Abkhazia are analysed in conjunction with current historical, political and economic processes. The result shows that there are group specific differences concerning the views on diasporic Abkhaz in Abkhazia. These views largely correspond to the respondents various positions in relation to political power and influence in Abkhazia, and their interests in retaining the dominant position of ethnic Abkhaz inside Abkhazia, or on competing for resources (livelihoods, state subsidies etc.). 

Keywords
Refugee, Abkhazia, Belonging, Return, Diaspora, Syria
National Category
Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-33355 (URN)
Conference
23rd Annual World Convention of the Association for the Study of Nationalities (ASN), New York, May 3-5, 2017
Available from: 2018-03-26 Created: 2018-03-26 Last updated: 2019-09-17Bibliographically approved
Lundgren, M. (2016). Borders as Spaces of Risk: Power and Otherness along the Georgian-Abkhazian Boundary Line. In: : . Paper presented at The Association for the Study of Nationalities 2016 World Convention,New York, USA,14-16 april,2016. New York
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Borders as Spaces of Risk: Power and Otherness along the Georgian-Abkhazian Boundary Line
2016 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

While most research on borders and security issues is centred on preventing unwanted risk objects to enter the territory, this study departs from the opposite angle, and focuses on young migrants navigating the consequences of war and ethnic conflict.

Around 50 000 ethnic Georgians have returned to southern Abkhazia after the 1992-93 conflict that caused the forced displacement of more than half of the population of the former autonomous Abkhazian republic. The Russian-Abkhazian border control along the administrative boundary line between Abkhazia and Georgia poses an obstacle to young people from returnee families who are studying in Georgia proper. This study, that builds on ethnographic fieldwork and five in-depth qualitative interviews with young people aged 18-25, aims to examine the strategies and practices employ to cross the border. To reach their homes in Abkhazia they need to navigate through riskscapes - landscapes or physical settings embedded with multiple layers of risk. Depending on their social positions (gender, ethnicity, citizenship, age) different riskscapes are unfolded. To handle riskscapes these young people change adopt preventive measures; they change routes and behavior. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York: , 2016
Keywords
Border, Abkhazia, Georgia, Risk, Riskscapes, Youth
National Category
Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-27494 (URN)
Conference
The Association for the Study of Nationalities 2016 World Convention,New York, USA,14-16 april,2016
Available from: 2016-04-22 Created: 2016-04-22 Last updated: 2016-04-25Bibliographically approved
Lundgren, M. (2016). Boundaries of displacement: Belonging and Return among Forcibly Displaced Young Georgians from Abkhazia. (Doctoral dissertation). Östersund: Mittuniversitetet
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Boundaries of displacement: Belonging and Return among Forcibly Displaced Young Georgians from Abkhazia
2016 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

This dissertation explores the implications of borders and boundaries for how forcibly displaced young Georgians from Abkhazia understand issues of belonging and return. My theoretical framework draws from theories on home and belonging as well as theories on border and boundary making, and locates them in geographies of uncertainty – or riskscapes – areas characterized by conflict and/or inequality. Empirical data was collected through two sets of interviews in Zugdidi near the border to Abkhazia and a questionnaire survey in Zugdidi and the capital Tbilisi. These data have been analysed through both qualitative and quantitative methods.

 

The young respondents providing material for this research do not constitute a homogenous group. Some of the respondents have family still living in Abkhazia or even partly grew up in the area; others have never been there. The primary goal of the Georgian government has been that the displaced population should return to their homes, and the government’s efforts for local integration has long been insufficient. Since no peace accords have been signed, a lack of security prevents a large-scale return. Notwithstanding increased border controls that have made it difficult to visit former homes, some young people still cross the de facto border. By doing this they contest both the Abkhazian de facto authorities and the border as a symbol of separation and differentiation, while claiming a right to belong in Abkhazia. Property and social relations in Abkhazia contribute to stronger connections and an imperative to return. On the other hand, experience of hardship in contemporary Abkhazia has resulted in some young people not considering return as a viable option. Youth who never visited Abkhazia depend mainly on other peoples’ memories and political discourse to create emotional bonds to the area their parents fled and to form their ideas of return. Results from the quantitative survey indicate that youth living in Tbilisi, closer to the political centre, to a higher extent intend to return than their peers in Zugdidi. Meanwhile young people’s experiences of everyday life in current dwellings in relative stability create emotional bonds to their present place of living. These experiences challenge both collective processes and experiences from Abkhazia when it comes to maintaining the desire to return.

 

This research offers insights into the human consequences of war and conflict. More specifically, this dissertation sheds light on how young internally displaced persons (IDPs) are living in a borderland (in both temporal and spatial terms) characterized by uncertainty-- between the past and the future as well as between Georgia and Abkhazia. Practices of exclusion and segregation are constitutive of the borders and boundaries that permeate life experiences of the forcibly displaced youth. Furthermore, these borders and boundaries are situated in riskscapes of disputed belongings, which makes this borderland more or less stable for different groups of IDPs. This dissertation contributes to an increased understanding of how political aspirations and personal desire to return preserves instability and uncertainty as long as return is not possible. 

Abstract [sv]

Denna avhandling undersöker konsekvenserna av gränser och gränsskapande för hur unga georgiska internflyktingar från Abkhazien förstår frågor om tillhörighet och återvändande. Jag utgår från teorier om hem och tillhörighet, liksom teorier om gränser och gränsskapande, och lokaliserar dem till geografier av osäkerhet – “riskscapes” – områden som karaktäriseras av konflikter och/eller ojämlikheter. Det datamaterial som ligger till grund för avhandlingen utgörs av två intervjustudier i Zugdidi nära gränsen till Abkhazien; och en enkätstudie som genomfördes i Zugdidi och i den georgiska huvudstaden Tbilisi. Materialet har analyserats genom användande av både kvalitativa och kvantitativa metoder.

 

Avhandlingens respondenter utgör inte en homogen grupp. Några respondenter har familj och släktingar som bor i Abkhazien eller har delvis växt upp i området, medan andra aldrig ens varit där. Det primära målet för den georgiska regeringen har varit att internflyktingarna ska återvända till sina hem, och regeringens ansträngningar för integration i lokalsamhället har länge varit otillräckliga. Det saknas fredsavtal och bristen på säkerhet förhindrar återvändande i stor skala. Trots de ökade gränskontroller som gjort det svårt att korsa de facto gränslinjen tar sig en del ungdomar ändå over gränsen. Genom att göra detta bestrider de både de abkhaziska de facto myndigheterna och gränsen som symbol för separation och åtskillnad, medan de hävdar sin rätt att känna tillhörighet till Abkhazien. Att ha ett hus och sociala relationer i Abkhazien bidrar till emotionella band och en starkare uppmaning till att återvända. Å andra sidan kan erfarenheterna av vardagens umbäranden inne i Abkhazien resultera i att unga människor inte ser återvändande som ett tänkbart alternativ. Ungdomar som aldrig varit i Abkhazien är beroende av andra människors minnen och politiska diskurser för att skapa känslomässiga band och tankar om återvändande till det område deras föräldrar har flytt från. Resultat från den kvantitativa undersökningen visar vidare att ungdomar som bor i Tbilisi, närmare Georgiens politiska centrum, i högre grad anger att de har för avsikt att återvända än deras jämnåriga i Tbilisi. Ungdomars erfarenheter av vardagslivet i sina nuvarande bostäder i relativ stabilitet bidrar emellertid till att skapa känslomässiga band till den aktuella bostadsorten. Dessa erfarenheter utmanar på så vis både de kollektiva processerna och erfarenheter från Abkhazien när det gäller att upprätthålla drömmen om återvändande.

 

Avhandlingen bidrar med insikter om konsekvenser av krig och konflikter för människors vardagsliv. Mer specifikt belyser jag hur avhandlingens unga respondenter lever i en sorts rumsligt och temporalt gränsland mellan det förflutna och framtiden och mellan Georgien och Abkhazien, och detta gränsland kännetecknas av osäkerhet. Praktiker av isärhållande och segregering är konstituerande för de gränser som genomsyrar internflyktingungdomarnas erfarenheter. Dessa gränser är dessutom situerade i ”riskscapes” av ifrågasatta tillhörigheter, som gör gränslandet mer eller mindre stabilt för olika grupper av internflyktingar. Avhandlingen bidrar med en ökad förståelse för hur politiska ambitioner och personliga drömmar om återvändande håller kvar människor i instabilitet och osäkerhet så länge återvändandet inte är möjligt. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Östersund: Mittuniversitetet, 2016. p. 93
Series
Mid Sweden University doctoral thesis, ISSN 1652-893X ; 250
Keywords
Georgia, Abkhazia, Caucasus, IDP, internal displacement, return, forced displacement, youth, border, riskscapes, uncertainty
National Category
Sociology (excluding Social Work, Social Psychology and Social Anthropology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-28661 (URN)978-91-88025-80-7 (ISBN)
Public defence
2016-09-30, F229, Kunskapens väg 8, Östersund, 10:30 (Swedish)
Opponent
Supervisors
Note

Vid tidpunkten för disputationen var följande delarbeten opublicerade: delarbete 3 inskickat.

At the time of the doctoral defence the following papers were unpublished: paper 3 submitted.

Available from: 2016-09-01 Created: 2016-09-01 Last updated: 2017-08-18Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-7512-9066

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