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Devik, S., Enmarker, I. & Hellzén, O. (2020). Nurses’ experiences of compassion when giving palliative care at home. Nursing Ethics, 27(1), 194-205
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Nurses’ experiences of compassion when giving palliative care at home
2020 (English)In: Nursing Ethics, ISSN 0969-7330, E-ISSN 1477-0989, Vol. 27, no 1, p. 194-205Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Compassion is seen as a core professional value in nursing and as essential in the effort of relieving suffering and promoting well-being in palliative care patients. Despite the advances in modern healthcare systems, there is a growing clinical and scientific concern that the value of compassion in palliative care is being less emphasised. Objective: This study aimed to explore nurses’ experiences of compassion when caring for palliative patients in home nursing care. Design and participants: A secondary qualitative analysis inspired by hermeneutic circling was performed on narrative interviews with 10 registered nurses recruited from municipal home nursing care facilities in Mid-Norway. Ethical considerations: The Norwegian Social Science Data Services granted permission for the study (No. 34299) and the re-use of the data. Findings: The compassionate experience was illuminated by one overarching theme: valuing caring interactions as positive, negative or neutral, which entailed three themes: (1) perceiving the patient’s plea, (2) interpreting feelings and (3) reasoning about accountability and action, with subsequent subthemes. Discussion: In contrast to most studies on compassion, our results highlight that a lack of compassion entails experiences of both negative and neutral content. Conclusion: The phenomenon of neutral caring interactions and lack of compassion demands further explorations from both a patient – and a nurse perspective.

National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-36663 (URN)10.1177/0969733019839218 (DOI)
Available from: 2019-07-08 Created: 2019-07-08 Last updated: 2020-02-05Bibliographically approved
Ness, T. M., Söderberg, S. & Hellzèn, O. (2019). ‘Contradictions in having care providers with a South Sami background who speak South Sami’: older South Sami People in Sweden's expectations of home nursing care. Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences
Open this publication in new window or tab >>‘Contradictions in having care providers with a South Sami background who speak South Sami’: older South Sami People in Sweden's expectations of home nursing care
2019 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

The Sami are an indigenous population with multiple languages and dialects living in northern areas of Sweden, Norway, Finland, and the Kola Peninsula. The South Sami population lives in central regions of Sweden and Norway, and consist of about 2000 people. In this study, 56 older South Sami people from Sweden participated. Semi-structured interviews were conducted over the telephone and analysed through qualitative content analysis. The main findings show that older South Sami people's expectations of having care providers with a South Sami background speaking South Sami in home nursing care contain contradictions in and between participants. Participants had different preferences regarding having care providers with a South Sami background speaking South Sami in the future. When providing care to older South Sami people, individual adjustments are of importance, and our study showed that participants had different expectations despite having similar backgrounds. 

Keywords
expectations, home nursing care, qualitative content analysis, South Sami people
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-37304 (URN)10.1111/scs.12747 (DOI)000485751400001 ()31487067 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-09-24 Created: 2019-09-24 Last updated: 2019-11-12Bibliographically approved
Hammarström, L., Häggström, M., Devik, S. A. & Hellzén, O. (2019). Controlling emotions - nurses’ lived experiences caring for patients in forensic psychiatry. International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, 14(1), Article ID 1682911.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Controlling emotions - nurses’ lived experiences caring for patients in forensic psychiatry
2019 (English)In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 14, no 1, article id 1682911Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: Nurses working in forensic psychiatry often encounter offenders who have a severe mental illness, which may cause ethical challenges and influence nurses’ daily work. This study was conducted to illuminate the meaning of nurses’ lived experiences of encounters with patients with mental illnesses in forensic inpatient care. Methods: This qualitative study employed narrative interviews with 13 nurses. Interviews were audiotaped and transcribed verbatim and analysed following a phenomenological-hermeneutic approach. Results: Four key themes were revealed: “Being frustrated” (subthemes included “Fighting resignation” and “Being disappointed”), “Protecting oneself” (subthemes included “To shy away,” “Being on your guard,” and “Being disclosed”), “Being open-minded” (subthemes included “Being confirmed,” “Developing trust,” and “Developing compassion”), and “Striving for control” (subthemes included “Sensing mutual vulnerability” and “Regulating oneself”). Further, working in forensic psychiatry challenged nurses’ identity as healthcare professionals because of being in a stressful context. Conclusions: Dealing with aggressive patients with severe mental illnesses threatens nurses’ professional identity. Nurses must attempt to empathize with patients’ experiences and respond accordingly. Utilizing strategies rooted in compassion such as self-reflection, emotional regulation, and distancing themselves when necessary may enable nurses to more effectively respond to patients’ needs. © 2019, © 2019 The Author(s). Published by Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.

Keywords
Encounters, forensic nursing, forensic psychiatry, lived experience, nurse-patient relationship, nursing, phenomenological-hermeneutic approach
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-37685 (URN)10.1080/17482631.2019.1682911 (DOI)000492076200001 ()2-s2.0-85074102728 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-11-15 Created: 2019-11-15 Last updated: 2020-02-19Bibliographically approved
Rasmussen, H., Hellzén, O., Stordal, E. & Enmarker, I. (2019). Family caregivers experiences of the pre-diagnostic stage in frontotemporal dementia. Geriatric Nursing, 40(3), 246-251
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Family caregivers experiences of the pre-diagnostic stage in frontotemporal dementia
2019 (English)In: Geriatric Nursing, ISSN 0197-4572, E-ISSN 1528-3984, Vol. 40, no 3, p. 246-251Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Frontotemporal dementia (FTD)is a neurodegenerative disease with symptoms that differs from other dementias. Commonly early symptoms in FTD are changes in personality and behavior, which can be interpreted as psychiatric disease. The delay in FTD diagnos is contributes to the burden of family caregivers. Therefore, it is important to have more knowledge about the pre-diagnostic stage. In this qualitative interview study, we explored fourteen family caregiver's experiences of the pre-diagnostic stage of frontotemporal dementia (FTD). Our findings suggest that the family caregivers experienced the pre-diagnostic stage of FTD as changes in the interpersonal relationship with their loved one.  These changes were often subtle and difficult for family caregivers to explain to others. The findings from our study illuminate the importance of medical staff paying attention when a next of kin is concerned about subtle changes in a loved one. The findings also illuminate that awareness of FTD should be raised.

National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-35080 (URN)10.1016/j.gerinurse.2018.10.006 (DOI)000474332200003 ()30424902 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85056274633 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-12-06 Created: 2018-12-06 Last updated: 2019-08-09Bibliographically approved
Østby, M., Osterhals, O. M., Haugenes, M., Sten, M., Asmyhr, Å., Moe, S. & Hellzén, O. (2019). Medforskning i Mitt hjem - Min arbeidsplass. In: May Østby & Marit Haugenes (Ed.), Inkluderende forskning sammen med personer med utviklingshemming: en metodebok (pp. 38-54). Oslo: Universitetsforlaget
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Medforskning i Mitt hjem - Min arbeidsplass
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2019 (Norwegian)In: Inkluderende forskning sammen med personer med utviklingshemming: en metodebok / [ed] May Østby & Marit Haugenes, Oslo: Universitetsforlaget, 2019, p. 38-54Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [no]

Inkluderende forskning er en av flere metoder for å bidra til kunnskapsutvikling i tjenester for personer med utviklingshemming. Denne boka presenterer erfaringer fra ulike forskningsprosjekt i samarbeid med personer med utviklingshemming gjennomført de siste årene. En rekke forskere fra flere universiteter og høyskoler har bidratt. Her beskrives konkrete metoder for hvordan man kan oppnå reell medvirkning i forskningens ulike faser, og suksessfaktorer og mulige utfordringer drøftes. Relevante teoretiske perspektiver drøftes sammen med dilemmaer knyttet til denne typen av forskning. Det at personer med utviklingshemming selv deltar i forskningen, gir dem en unik mulighet for påvirkning av tjenestetilbud og eget liv. Boka beskriver hvordan det kan legges til rette for økt innflytelse og deltakelse, noe som er overførbart til miljøterapeutisk arbeid.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oslo: Universitetsforlaget, 2019
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-37795 (URN)978-82-15-03129-3 (ISBN)
Available from: 2019-11-25 Created: 2019-11-25 Last updated: 2019-12-17Bibliographically approved
Rönnberg, L., Nilsson, U., Hellzén, O. & Melin-Johansson, C. (2019). The Art Is to Extubate, Not to Intubate-Swedish Registered Nurse Anesthetists' Experiences of the Process of Extubation After General Anesthesia. Journal of Perianesthesia Nursing, 34(4), 789-800
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Art Is to Extubate, Not to Intubate-Swedish Registered Nurse Anesthetists' Experiences of the Process of Extubation After General Anesthesia
2019 (English)In: Journal of Perianesthesia Nursing, ISSN 1089-9472, E-ISSN 1532-8473, Vol. 34, no 4, p. 789-800Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: To describe Registered Nurse Anesthetists' (RNA's) experiences of the process of extubation of the endotracheal tube in patients undergoing general anesthesia. Design: A descriptive qualitative design. Methods: This study was conducted in two hospitals with 20 RNAs in total. Data were generated from focus group interviews. Content analysis was used to analyze data. Findings: The RNAs' experiences were described within four categories and eight subcategories. The category To be a step ahead includes assessment and preparation, and To be on my toes, their ability to recognize patterns and build a connection. To use situation awareness relates to their use of experience and feelings, and To be alone in a critical moment, to feeling alone in the team and protecting the patient. Conclusions: The RNAs make decisions when to extubate by combining theoretical knowledge, clinical experience, and intuition with the uniqueness of each patient.

Keywords
critical moment, endotracheal tube, experience, extubation, Registered Nurse Anesthetist, teamwork
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-36863 (URN)10.1016/j.jopan.2018.11.007 (DOI)000477975200018 ()30745264 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-08-15 Created: 2019-08-15 Last updated: 2019-08-15Bibliographically approved
Voraroon, S., Hellzén, O., Enmarker, I., Meebunmak, Y. & Devik, S. A. (2019). The impact of shareholding networks for facilitating care in rural Thailand. Geriatric Nursing, 40(4), 392-398
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The impact of shareholding networks for facilitating care in rural Thailand
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2019 (English)In: Geriatric Nursing, ISSN 0197-4572, E-ISSN 1528-3984, Vol. 40, no 4, p. 392-398Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study explored the existential meaning of being a participant in shareholding networks for the care of older people in Thailand. Ten older persons were interviewed about their experiences of participating in the networks. A reflective lifeworld perspective based on phenomenological philosophy was used. The findings show that participating in shareholding network activities entails an always-present existence of aging intertwined with life. Its constituents further describe the essential meaning of the phenomenon: “experience of improved self-management”, “feeling of increased self-esteem”, and “bridging a gap in the care of older people”. Participation in shareholding network activities means keeping contact with oneself and being able to have a life that corresponds to how one perceives oneself to be and must therefore be understood from a holistic perspective. The present study recommends that older persons’ need for support include places where safe and profound reflection on existential issues. 

Keywords
Holistic understanding, Lifeworld research, Older people, Phenomenology, Shareholding network
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-35830 (URN)10.1016/j.gerinurse.2019.01.002 (DOI)000485857400007 ()30765176 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-03-19 Created: 2019-03-19 Last updated: 2019-11-12Bibliographically approved
Eivergård, K., Enmarker, I., Livholts, M., Aléx, L. & Hellzén, O. (2019). The Importance of Being Acceptable: Psychiatric Staffs’ Talk about Women Patients in Forensic Care. Issues in Mental Health Nursing, 40(2), 124-132
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Importance of Being Acceptable: Psychiatric Staffs’ Talk about Women Patients in Forensic Care
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2019 (English)In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 40, no 2, p. 124-132Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Currently, women comprise about ten percent of those sentenced to psychiatric forensic clinics in Sweden. Those who are sentenced to forensic care because of offending and violent behaviour have already taken a step away from the usually expected female behaviour. On the other hand, there are many women in forensic care who have not committed crimes, but who instead selfharm. Studies have identified a gender bias in diagnosing and care in psychiatric settings, but there are few studies conducted on women in forensic care. The present study therefore examined how the situation of women patients and female norms are expressed in the staff’s talk about these women during verbal handovers and ward rounds at a forensic clinic in Sweden. The aim was to explore how psychiatric staff, in a context of verbal handovers and ward rounds, talk about women who have been committed to forensic psychiatric care, and what consequences this might have for the care of the patients. The content of speech was examined using audio recordings and a method of analysis that was inspired by thematic analysis. The analysis identified that the staff talked about the women in a way that indicates that they expected the women to follow the rules and take responsibility for their bodies in order to be regarded as acceptable patients.                        

National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-35074 (URN)10.1080/01612840.2018.1514551 (DOI)000463571900006 ()30481089 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85057627205 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-12-06 Created: 2018-12-06 Last updated: 2019-05-22Bibliographically approved
Ness, T. M., Söderberg, S. & Hellzèn, O. (2019). ‘The same care providers over time who make individual adjustments and have competence’ Older South Sami People in Sweden's expectations of home nursing care. Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences
Open this publication in new window or tab >>‘The same care providers over time who make individual adjustments and have competence’ Older South Sami People in Sweden's expectations of home nursing care
2019 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

This study is part of a larger research project designed to examine the view of home nursing care from the perspective of older South Sami people in Sweden. In the present study, we present findings from the point of view of their expectations of home nursing care. The Sami are an indigenous population living in northern Sweden, Norway, Finland and the Kola Peninsula, and consist of different Sami people, of which the South Sami population is one. This population consists of approximately 2000 persons living in the central regions of Sweden and Norway. Fifty-six older South Sami people participated in the study. Semi-structured interviews were conducted over the telephone and were analysed using latent content analysis. The main findings show how older South Sami people's expectation for home nursing care contains the same care providers over time, individual adjustments and competent care providers and do not differ from the general Swedish population. Interpersonal interaction is a hallmark of nursing care and other healthcare disciplines. Ideally, interpersonal care is achieved when individual care providers have few care receivers, which promote continuity in care, individual adjustments based on the care receivers individual needs and care providers with professional and relational competence. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Blackwell Publishing Ltd, 2019
Keywords
expectations, home nursing care, qualitative content analysis, South Sami people
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-36705 (URN)10.1111/scs.12719 (DOI)
Available from: 2019-07-10 Created: 2019-07-10 Last updated: 2019-07-10Bibliographically approved
Björk, A., Rönngren, Y., Selander, J., Vinberg, S., Hellzén, O. & Olofsson, N. (2018). Health, lifestyle habits, and physical fitness among adults with ADHD compared with a random sample of a Swedish general population. Society, health and vulnerability, 9(1), Article ID UNSP 1553916.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Health, lifestyle habits, and physical fitness among adults with ADHD compared with a random sample of a Swedish general population
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2018 (English)In: Society, health and vulnerability, E-ISSN 2002-1518, Vol. 9, no 1, article id UNSP 1553916Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Persons with Attention Deficit Hyperactive Disorder (ADHD) represent a high-risk population according to health and lifestyles. In the present study, 48 adults with ADHD were recruited to a forthcoming lifestyle intervention. The ADHD sample was matched to a random sample of 42 persons from a Swedish general population that was selected from LIV (a Lifestyle-Performance-Health project).

Objective: To identify potential differences in health, lifestyle habits, and physical fitness between adults with and without ADHD.

Method: Self-reported questionnaires and physical fitness tests.

Results: The ADHD group show worse health outcomes with higher odds ratios for bad general health (OR;13 CI; (3,4–50)), and poorer lifestyle habits with higher odds ratios for low weekly exercise (OR; 3,8 CI; (1,2–13)). When adjusting for education, employment status, and cash margin, the ADHD sample did not show decreased aerobic fitness (OR; 0,9 CI; (0,8–1,0), but lower odds ratios for doing less sit-ups (OR; 0,6 CI; (0,4–0,9)) compared to the general population group.

Conclusion: It is not possible to prove that the ADHD diagnosis itself cause the worse health and lifestyle. Other lifestyle factors may have negative consequences of adult ADHD, such as lower levels of education, less succeed in working life, and minor financial margins.

Keywords
Adult ADHD, general health, lifestyle habits, mental health, fitness test, Swedish general population
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-35207 (URN)10.1080/20021518.2018.1553916 (DOI)000453874400001 ()
Note

Published online: 18 Dec 2018

Available from: 2018-12-14 Created: 2018-12-14 Last updated: 2020-01-29Bibliographically approved
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ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-1614-7379

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