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Rasmussen, H., Hellzén, O., Stordal, E. & Enmarker, I. (2019). Family caregivers experiences of the pre-diagnostic stage in frontotemporal dementia. Geriatric Nursing, 40(3), 246-251
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Family caregivers experiences of the pre-diagnostic stage in frontotemporal dementia
2019 (English)In: Geriatric Nursing, ISSN 0197-4572, E-ISSN 1528-3984, Vol. 40, no 3, p. 246-251Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Frontotemporal dementia (FTD)is a neurodegenerative disease with symptoms that differs from other dementias. Commonly early symptoms in FTD are changes in personality and behavior, which can be interpreted as psychiatric disease. The delay in FTD diagnos is contributes to the burden of family caregivers. Therefore, it is important to have more knowledge about the pre-diagnostic stage. In this qualitative interview study, we explored fourteen family caregiver's experiences of the pre-diagnostic stage of frontotemporal dementia (FTD). Our findings suggest that the family caregivers experienced the pre-diagnostic stage of FTD as changes in the interpersonal relationship with their loved one.  These changes were often subtle and difficult for family caregivers to explain to others. The findings from our study illuminate the importance of medical staff paying attention when a next of kin is concerned about subtle changes in a loved one. The findings also illuminate that awareness of FTD should be raised.

National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-35080 (URN)10.1016/j.gerinurse.2018.10.006 (DOI)000474332200003 ()30424902 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85056274633 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-12-06 Created: 2018-12-06 Last updated: 2019-08-09Bibliographically approved
Devik, S., Enmarker, I. & Hellzén, O. (2019). Nurses’ experiences of compassion when giving palliative care at home. Nursing Ethics
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Nurses’ experiences of compassion when giving palliative care at home
2019 (English)In: Nursing Ethics, ISSN 0969-7330, E-ISSN 1477-0989Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Background: Compassion is seen as a core professional value in nursing and as essential in the effort of relieving suffering and promoting well-being in palliative care patients. Despite the advances in modern healthcare systems, there is a growing clinical and scientific concern that the value of compassion in palliative care is being less emphasised. Objective: This study aimed to explore nurses’ experiences of compassion when caring for palliative patients in home nursing care. Design and participants: A secondary qualitative analysis inspired by hermeneutic circling was performed on narrative interviews with 10 registered nurses recruited from municipal home nursing care facilities in Mid-Norway. Ethical considerations: The Norwegian Social Science Data Services granted permission for the study (No. 34299) and the re-use of the data. Findings: The compassionate experience was illuminated by one overarching theme: valuing caring interactions as positive, negative or neutral, which entailed three themes: (1) perceiving the patient’s plea, (2) interpreting feelings and (3) reasoning about accountability and action, with subsequent subthemes. Discussion: In contrast to most studies on compassion, our results highlight that a lack of compassion entails experiences of both negative and neutral content. Conclusion: The phenomenon of neutral caring interactions and lack of compassion demands further explorations from both a patient – and a nurse perspective.

National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-36663 (URN)10.1177/0969733019839218 (DOI)
Available from: 2019-07-08 Created: 2019-07-08 Last updated: 2019-07-08Bibliographically approved
Rönnberg, L., Nilsson, U., Hellzén, O. & Melin-Johansson, C. (2019). The Art Is to Extubate, Not to Intubate-Swedish Registered Nurse Anesthetists' Experiences of the Process of Extubation After General Anesthesia. Journal of Perianesthesia Nursing, 34(4), 789-800
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Art Is to Extubate, Not to Intubate-Swedish Registered Nurse Anesthetists' Experiences of the Process of Extubation After General Anesthesia
2019 (English)In: Journal of Perianesthesia Nursing, ISSN 1089-9472, E-ISSN 1532-8473, Vol. 34, no 4, p. 789-800Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: To describe Registered Nurse Anesthetists' (RNA's) experiences of the process of extubation of the endotracheal tube in patients undergoing general anesthesia. Design: A descriptive qualitative design. Methods: This study was conducted in two hospitals with 20 RNAs in total. Data were generated from focus group interviews. Content analysis was used to analyze data. Findings: The RNAs' experiences were described within four categories and eight subcategories. The category To be a step ahead includes assessment and preparation, and To be on my toes, their ability to recognize patterns and build a connection. To use situation awareness relates to their use of experience and feelings, and To be alone in a critical moment, to feeling alone in the team and protecting the patient. Conclusions: The RNAs make decisions when to extubate by combining theoretical knowledge, clinical experience, and intuition with the uniqueness of each patient.

Keywords
critical moment, endotracheal tube, experience, extubation, Registered Nurse Anesthetist, teamwork
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-36863 (URN)10.1016/j.jopan.2018.11.007 (DOI)000477975200018 ()30745264 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-08-15 Created: 2019-08-15 Last updated: 2019-08-15Bibliographically approved
Voraroon, S., Hellzén, O., Enmarker, I., Meebunmak, Y. & Devik, S. A. (2019). The impact of shareholding networks for facilitating care in rural Thailand. Geriatric Nursing, 40(4), 392-398
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The impact of shareholding networks for facilitating care in rural Thailand
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2019 (English)In: Geriatric Nursing, ISSN 0197-4572, E-ISSN 1528-3984, Vol. 40, no 4, p. 392-398Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study explored the existential meaning of being a participant in shareholding networks for the care of older people in Thailand. Ten older persons were interviewed about their experiences of participating in the networks. A reflective lifeworld perspective based on phenomenological philosophy was used. The findings show that participating in shareholding network activities entails an always-present existence of aging intertwined with life. Its constituents further describe the essential meaning of the phenomenon: “experience of improved self-management”, “feeling of increased self-esteem”, and “bridging a gap in the care of older people”. Participation in shareholding network activities means keeping contact with oneself and being able to have a life that corresponds to how one perceives oneself to be and must therefore be understood from a holistic perspective. The present study recommends that older persons’ need for support include places where safe and profound reflection on existential issues. 

Keywords
Holistic understanding, Lifeworld research, Older people, Phenomenology, Shareholding network
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-35830 (URN)10.1016/j.gerinurse.2019.01.002 (DOI)
Available from: 2019-03-19 Created: 2019-03-19 Last updated: 2019-08-21Bibliographically approved
Eivergård, K., Enmarker, I., Livholts, M., Aléx, L. & Hellzén, O. (2019). The Importance of Being Acceptable: Psychiatric Staffs’ Talk about Women Patients in Forensic Care. Issues in Mental Health Nursing, 40(2), 124-132
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Importance of Being Acceptable: Psychiatric Staffs’ Talk about Women Patients in Forensic Care
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2019 (English)In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 40, no 2, p. 124-132Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Currently, women comprise about ten percent of those sentenced to psychiatric forensic clinics in Sweden. Those who are sentenced to forensic care because of offending and violent behaviour have already taken a step away from the usually expected female behaviour. On the other hand, there are many women in forensic care who have not committed crimes, but who instead selfharm. Studies have identified a gender bias in diagnosing and care in psychiatric settings, but there are few studies conducted on women in forensic care. The present study therefore examined how the situation of women patients and female norms are expressed in the staff’s talk about these women during verbal handovers and ward rounds at a forensic clinic in Sweden. The aim was to explore how psychiatric staff, in a context of verbal handovers and ward rounds, talk about women who have been committed to forensic psychiatric care, and what consequences this might have for the care of the patients. The content of speech was examined using audio recordings and a method of analysis that was inspired by thematic analysis. The analysis identified that the staff talked about the women in a way that indicates that they expected the women to follow the rules and take responsibility for their bodies in order to be regarded as acceptable patients.                        

National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-35074 (URN)10.1080/01612840.2018.1514551 (DOI)000463571900006 ()30481089 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85057627205 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-12-06 Created: 2018-12-06 Last updated: 2019-05-22Bibliographically approved
Ness, T. M., Söderberg, S. & Hellzèn, O. (2019). ‘The same care providers over time who make individual adjustments and have competence’ Older South Sami People in Sweden's expectations of home nursing care. Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences
Open this publication in new window or tab >>‘The same care providers over time who make individual adjustments and have competence’ Older South Sami People in Sweden's expectations of home nursing care
2019 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

This study is part of a larger research project designed to examine the view of home nursing care from the perspective of older South Sami people in Sweden. In the present study, we present findings from the point of view of their expectations of home nursing care. The Sami are an indigenous population living in northern Sweden, Norway, Finland and the Kola Peninsula, and consist of different Sami people, of which the South Sami population is one. This population consists of approximately 2000 persons living in the central regions of Sweden and Norway. Fifty-six older South Sami people participated in the study. Semi-structured interviews were conducted over the telephone and were analysed using latent content analysis. The main findings show how older South Sami people's expectation for home nursing care contains the same care providers over time, individual adjustments and competent care providers and do not differ from the general Swedish population. Interpersonal interaction is a hallmark of nursing care and other healthcare disciplines. Ideally, interpersonal care is achieved when individual care providers have few care receivers, which promote continuity in care, individual adjustments based on the care receivers individual needs and care providers with professional and relational competence. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Blackwell Publishing Ltd, 2019
Keywords
expectations, home nursing care, qualitative content analysis, South Sami people
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-36705 (URN)10.1111/scs.12719 (DOI)
Available from: 2019-07-10 Created: 2019-07-10 Last updated: 2019-07-10Bibliographically approved
Björk, A., Rönngren, Y., Selander, J., Vinberg, S., Hellzén, O. & Olofsson, N. (2018). Health, lifestyle habits, and physical fitness among adults with ADHD compared with a random sample of a Swedish general population. Society, health and vulnerability, 9(1), Article ID UNSP 1553916.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Health, lifestyle habits, and physical fitness among adults with ADHD compared with a random sample of a Swedish general population
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2018 (English)In: Society, health and vulnerability, E-ISSN 2002-1518, Vol. 9, no 1, article id UNSP 1553916Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Persons with Attention Deficit Hyperactive Disorder (ADHD) represent a high-risk population according to health and lifestyles. In the present study, 48 adults with ADHD were recruited to a forthcoming lifestyle intervention. The ADHD sample was matched to a random sample of 42 persons from a Swedish general population that was selected from LIV (a Lifestyle-Performance-Health project).

Objective: To identify potential differences in health, lifestyle habits, and physical fitness between adults with and without ADHD.

Method: Self-reported questionnaires and physical fitness tests.

Results: The ADHD group show worse health outcomes with higher odds ratios for bad general health (OR;13 CI; (3,4–50)), and poorer lifestyle habits with higher odds ratios for low weekly exercise (OR; 3,8 CI; (1,2–13)). When adjusting for education, employment status, and cash margin, the ADHD sample did not show decreased aerobic fitness (OR; 0,9 CI; (0,8–1,0), but lower odds ratios for doing less sit-ups (OR; 0,6 CI; (0,4–0,9)) compared to the general population group.

Conclusion: It is not possible to prove that the ADHD diagnosis itself cause the worse health and lifestyle. Other lifestyle factors may have negative consequences of adult ADHD, such as lower levels of education, less succeed in working life, and minor financial margins.

Keywords
Adult ADHD, general health, lifestyle habits, mental health, fitness test, Swedish general population
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-35207 (URN)10.1080/20021518.2018.1553916 (DOI)000453874400001 ()
Note

Published online: 18 Dec 2018

Available from: 2018-12-14 Created: 2018-12-14 Last updated: 2019-01-08Bibliographically approved
Hellzén, O., Haugenes, M. & Ostby, M. (2018). 'It's my home and your work': the views of a filmed vignette describing a challenging everyday situation from the perspective of people with intellectual disabilities. International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, 13(1), Article ID 1468198.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>'It's my home and your work': the views of a filmed vignette describing a challenging everyday situation from the perspective of people with intellectual disabilities
2018 (English)In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 13, no 1, article id 1468198Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: Examining everyday challenges in the interactions between people with intellectual disabilities and their staff, as seen from the user's perspective, is an important perspective in health care research. Involving people with intellectual disabilities as so-called co-researchers is a relatively unexplored research strategy. In this paper, co-researchers participated in all the steps of the research process, from planning to reporting, in addition to the written reporting of the findings. The aim of this study was to explore how people with intellectual disabilities experienced a filmed vignette of an everyday situation. Method: Based on audio-recorded and transcribed individual and focus-group interviews with people with intellectual disabilities, performed by co-researchers with intellectual disabilities together with researchers, qualitative content analysis was used. Results: The analysis reveals three themes: "being emotionally touched", "being aware of the other", and "being unclear". Conclusions: The results are discussed in light of normalization and participation in society with independence and one's own decision-making. Regarding the care of people with intellectual disabilities, the main finding is the need to focus not only on greater involvement of this population in their own daily lives, but also to teach self-determination skills. Another finding is the importance of involving people with intellectual impairment as co-researchers.

Keywords
Content analysis, ethical issues, focus-group interviews, intellectual disabilities, vignettes
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-33678 (URN)10.1080/17482631.2018.1468198 (DOI)000431817300001 ()29733261 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85046860160 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-05-30 Created: 2018-05-30 Last updated: 2018-07-04Bibliographically approved
Devik Andreasen, S., Hellzen, O. & Enmarker, I. (2017). Bereaved family members' perspectives on suffering among older rural cancer patients in palliative home nursing care: A qualitative study. European Journal of Cancer Care, 26(6), Article ID e12609.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Bereaved family members' perspectives on suffering among older rural cancer patients in palliative home nursing care: A qualitative study
2017 (English)In: European Journal of Cancer Care, ISSN 0961-5423, E-ISSN 1365-2354, Vol. 26, no 6, article id e12609Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Little is known about experiences with receiving home nursing care when old, living in a rural area, and suffering from end-stage cancer. The aim of this study was thus to investigate bereaved family members' perceptions of suffering by their older relatives when receiving palliative home nursing care. Qualitative semi-structured interviews were conducted with 10 family members, in Norway during autumn 2015, and directed content analysis guided by Katie Eriksson's theoretical framework on human suffering was performed upon the data. The two main categories identified reflected expressions of both suffering and well-being. Expressions of suffering were related to illness, to care and to life and supported the theory. Expressions of well-being were related to other people (e.g. familiar people and nurses), to home and to activity. The results indicate a need to review and possibly expand the perspective of what should motivate care. Nursing and palliative care that become purely disease and symptom-focused may end up with giving up and divert the attention to social and cultural factors that may contribute to well-being when cure is not the goal.

Keywords
bereaved family members, home nursing care, palliative care, qualitative directed content
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-29555 (URN)10.1111/ecc.12609 (DOI)000414613000027 ()2-s2.0-85006049737 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-12-14 Created: 2016-12-14 Last updated: 2018-02-28Bibliographically approved
Brodin, K., Hellzén, O. & Häggström, M. (2017). Intraoperative Care of the Conscious Patient from the Perspective of the Operating Theatre Nurse: A Grounded Theory. Open Journal of Nursing, 7(9), 1086-1099
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Intraoperative Care of the Conscious Patient from the Perspective of the Operating Theatre Nurse: A Grounded Theory
2017 (English)In: Open Journal of Nursing, ISSN 2162-5336, E-ISSN 2162-5344, Vol. 7, no 9, p. 1086-1099Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction: Intraoperative care includes a unique knowledge of how to

perform a safe and effective surgery procedure. Surgery performed under regional

or local anaesthesia allows the patient to remain conscious during the

procedure and is rather common in Swedish healthcare today. Aim: The aim

was to obtain a deeper understanding of the main concerns of operating theatre

nurses (OTN) when caring for conscious patients during the intraoperative

phase. Methods: Interviews were conducted with 23 OTNs from five different

hospitals in Sweden and analysed according to grounded theory. Findings:

The main concern among the OTNs was to take the patient in consideration.

The core category “achieve and maintain ethical treatment of patients”

in the operating theatre (OT) was a strategy used throughout the intraoperative

process. Ethical treatment was described as moral behaviour at

different levels and included the team’s behaviour, respectful and individualised

patientcare, and the working-morale of the professionals. Being vigilant

and being flexible were the categories related to the core category. The OTNs

constantly assessed where to pay most attention as they balanced between the

needs of the patient, the team, and the surgery procedure. Conclusion: It is

important that every patient is taken into consideration and that ethical principles

are held to the highest standards in the OT. A familiar team can facilitate

that. The complex skills that operating theatre nurses develop can be

added to explain important competencies within the profession.

Keywords
Conscious Patient, Grounded Theory, Intraoperative Care, Nursing
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-32241 (URN)10.4236/ojn.2017.79079 (DOI)
Available from: 2017-12-04 Created: 2017-12-04 Last updated: 2018-09-13Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-1614-7379

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