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Norbergh, Karl-Gustav
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Publications (10 of 31) Show all publications
Høgsnes, L., Norbergh, K.-G. & Melin-Johansson, C. (2019). "Being in Between" Nurses' Experiences When Caring for Individuals With Dementia and Encountering Family Caregivers' Existential Life Situations. Research in Gerontological Nursing, 12(2), 91-98
Open this publication in new window or tab >>"Being in Between" Nurses' Experiences When Caring for Individuals With Dementia and Encountering Family Caregivers' Existential Life Situations
2019 (English)In: Research in Gerontological Nursing, ISSN 1940-4921, E-ISSN 1938-2464, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 91-98Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The focus of the current study was to explore nursing home staff's understanding and how they approach family caregivers' existential life situations when caring for individuals with dementia. A qualitative interview study was conducted with 20 nursing staff in two nursing homes in northern Sweden. Face-to-face interviews were analyzed using interpretive content analysis. One overarching theme with three themes and nine subthemes comprised the findings. The themes describe how nursing staff were "in between" when they cared for individuals with dementia and encountered family caregivers' existential life situations. Nurses acted as advocates and safeguarded family caregivers via dialogues and interactions. Nurses were supporters and by"being in between"they eased family caregivers'feelings of powerlessness in relation to dying and death."Being in between" may give nurses a deeper understanding of family caregivers'existential needs, thus increasing family caregivers' well-being.

National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-36156 (URN)10.3928/19404921-20190207-01 (DOI)000461766600005 ()30893444 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85063627559 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-05-20 Created: 2019-05-20 Last updated: 2020-02-20Bibliographically approved
Palm, A., Danielsson, I., Högberg, U. & Norbergh, K.-G. (2017). How do youth with experience of violence victimization and/or risk drinking perceive routine inquiry about violence and alcohol consumption in Swedish youth clinics?: A qualitative study. Sexual & Reproductive HealthCare, 13, 51-57
Open this publication in new window or tab >>How do youth with experience of violence victimization and/or risk drinking perceive routine inquiry about violence and alcohol consumption in Swedish youth clinics?: A qualitative study
2017 (English)In: Sexual & Reproductive HealthCare, ISSN 1877-5756, E-ISSN 1877-5764, Vol. 13, p. 51-57Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: To explore perceptions and experiences among youth who underwent structured questions about violence victimization and alcohol consumption when visiting Swedish youth clinics.

Methods: This study is part of a larger research project examining the effect of including routine inquiry about violence victimization and alcohol consumption for youth visiting youth clinics. Fifteen youth with experiences of victimization and/or risk drinking (AUDIT-C >= 5) were interviewed. Content analysis was used.

Results: The findings were grouped into three main categories: The first; "Disclosure talking about violence" reflected the participants' experiences of being asked about victimization. Participants were in favor of routine inquiry about violence victimization, even when questions caused distress. The questions helped participants reflect on prior victimization and process what had happened to them. The second; "Influence on the life situation" demonstrated that many of the participants still were effected by prior victimization, but also how talking about violence sometimes led to the possibility of initiating change such as leaving a destructive relationship or starting therapy. In the third; "One's own alcohol consumption in black and white" participants considered it natural to be asked about alcohol consumption. However, most participants did not consider their drinking problematic, even when told they exceeded guidelines. They viewed risk drinking in terms of immediate consequences rather than in quantity or frequency of alcohol intake.

Conclusion: Routine inquiry about violence victimization and risk drinking at youth clinics was well received. Questions about violence helped participants to interpret and process prior victimization and sometimes initiated change.

National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-31370 (URN)10.1016/j.srhc.2017.06.004 (DOI)000411305800008 ()28844358 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85021289957 (Scopus ID)
Note

Available online 19 June 2017

Available from: 2017-08-10 Created: 2017-08-10 Last updated: 2017-10-18Bibliographically approved
Høgsnes, L., Danielson, E., Norbergh, K.-G. & Melin-Johansson, C. (2016). Healthcare professionals' documentation in nursing homes when caring for patients with dementia in end of life - a retrospective records review. Journal of Clinical Nursing, 25(11-12), 1663-1673
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Healthcare professionals' documentation in nursing homes when caring for patients with dementia in end of life - a retrospective records review
2016 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 25, no 11-12, p. 1663-1673Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aims and objectives: To investigate how end-of-life care was described by healthcare professionals in records of deceased persons affected by dementia who had lived in Swedish nursing homes. Background: In the final stage of dementia disease, the persons are often cared for at nursing homes and they often die there. The research concurs that a palliative approach to end-of-life care is essential but there are still some limitations regarding research about what constitutes the end-of-life care provided to persons affected by dementia in Sweden. Design: Descriptive qualitative method with a retrospective approach. Method: Nursing records (n = 50) and medical records (n = 50) were retrospectively reviewed in two nursing homes. The analysis was conducted using deductive and inductive content analysis. Three phases of The Liverpool Care Pathway; Initial assessment, Continuous assessment and Follow-up, were used deductively to first sort the text in the records, then the text in each phase was further analysed with inductive content analysis. Four categories and 11 subcategories described the content in the records. Results: The end-of-life care was described in the healthcare records based on such categories as decision-making, participation and communication, assessment and prevention of symptom and following up after the residents had died. Conclusion: Paticularly, physical symptoms were documented and, to a lesser degree, psychological or existential/spiritual needs. Relevance to clinical practice: Healthcare professionals must have a holistic view of the person affected by dementia during the end-of-life care and, according to this study, more focus must be placed on their psychosocial and existential needs in the documentation of end-of-life care.

Keywords
Dementia, Documentation, End of life, Palliative care, Patient records
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-27839 (URN)10.1111/jocn.13184 (DOI)000375866200018 ()27139172 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84964777712 (Scopus ID)
Note

Article

Available from: 2016-06-09 Created: 2016-06-09 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
Høgsnes, L., Norbergh, K.-G., Danielson, E. & Melin Johansson, C. (2016). The Shift in Existential Life situation of Adult Children to Parents with Dementia Relocated to Nursing Homes. Open Nursing Journal, 10, 122-130
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Shift in Existential Life situation of Adult Children to Parents with Dementia Relocated to Nursing Homes
2016 (English)In: Open Nursing Journal, ISSN 1874-4346, E-ISSN 1874-4346, Vol. 10, p. 122-130Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background:

Previous research describes spouses and adult children of people with dementia as a homogeneous group using one term: family caregivers. Recent research shows that the needs and experiences of spouses and adult children differ, therefore they cannot be studied as a homogeneous group.

Aims:

The aim of the study was to describe the shift in existential life situations of adult children of a parent with dementia relocated to nursing homes.

Design:

This is a qualitative study with an interpretive approach.

Methods:

Face-to-face interviews were held with 11 adult children aged 48-65 years. The interviews lasted 30–60 minutes and data were analysed using interpretive content analysis.

Findings:

The adult children described how they experienced their life situation before and after their parents’ relocation. Before relocation they described feelings of powerlessness, loneliness in their responsibilities, loss and guilt. After relocation they had feelings of freedom, ongoing responsibility, living with loss and having a new relationship with death.

Conclusion:

The most important finding in our study was that adult children developed a different relationship with death than before the parent became affected by dementia. It is essential that healthcare staff understand and address the adult children’s existential life situations and the suffering they are experiencing. Healthcare staff need to be conscious about adult children’s needs for support to address their existential life situations before and after their parents relocate to nursing homes.

Keywords
Adult Children, Dementia, Existential, Nursing Homes, Qualitative Methods
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-29366 (URN)10.2174/1874434601610010122 (DOI)2-s2.0-85032090284 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-11-30 Created: 2016-11-30 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
Kjällman Alm, A., Hagglund, P., Norbergh, K.-G. & Hellzén, O. (2015). Sense of Coherence in Persons with Dementia and Their Next of Kin: A Mixed-Method Study. Open Journal of Nursing, 5, 490--499
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sense of Coherence in Persons with Dementia and Their Next of Kin: A Mixed-Method Study
2015 (English)In: Open Journal of Nursing, ISSN 2162-5336, E-ISSN 2162-5344, Vol. 5, p. 490--499Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Indications of dementia disease include deterioration of memory, thinking, behaviour, and the

ability to perform everyday activities. Any of these symptoms can lead to stress and difficulties

organizing everyday life. As a way to view factors that support human health and well-being despite

stressful situations, Antonovsky introduced a salutogenic model. This model proposes that

sense of coherence primarily determines physical and mental health i.e. psychological well-being.

Having a sense of coherence in everyday life can reduce the impact of stress on the individual in

everyday life. The study’s aim of this study was to explore how participants in existing support

groups scored on the Sense of Coherence Scale (SOC), and what they perceived as contributory

factors to a meaningful, manageable, and comprehensible everyday life in the presence of dementia

using a mixed method. Persons with dementia had the highest scores on the SOC scale and their

partners the lowest. Persons with dementia expressed that being with others who understood

them made their everyday life comprehensible and manageable. Their partners expressed that

learning about dementia was helpful in managing and comprehending everyday situations. The

adult children expressed that it was meaningful to care for their parents and they scored slightly

higher than the partners on the SOC scale. Long-term ongoing support supplemented with information

and social support can contribute to the sense of coherence in persons with dementia and

their next of kin.

Keywords
Dementia, Next of Kin, Nursing, Mixed Method, Sense of Coherence, Support Groups
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-28766 (URN)10.4236/ojn.2015.55052 (DOI)
Available from: 2016-09-13 Created: 2016-09-13 Last updated: 2017-11-21Bibliographically approved
Kjällman Alm, A., Hellzén, O. & Norbergh, K.-G. (2014). Experiences of Family Relationships when a Family Member Has Dementia. Open Journal of Nursing, 4, 520-527
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Experiences of Family Relationships when a Family Member Has Dementia
2014 (English)In: Open Journal of Nursing, ISSN 2162-5336, E-ISSN 2162-5344, Vol. 4, p. 520-527Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Approximately 66 million people worldwide will suffer from dementia in 2030. The dementia’s impact affects people with the disorder and those in their social networks, most notably, their families. This study’s aim was to explore the experiences of family relationships when a family member has dementia. We conducted semi-structured interviews with people diagnosed with dementia, their spouses and adult children. Seventeen participants were interviewed. All participants were recruited in open-ended ongoing structured support groups provided by a Swedish municipality in order to elicit the participants’ subjective experiences on family relationships after the dementia diagnosis. Researchers used content analysis to examine the transcripts. Two main themes were identified, one relating to changed relationships where the participants experienced longing, lost closeness, loneliness and changed sibling relationships. The second theme related to supporting relationships within the family with experiences such as kinship, shared responsibilities and love and appreciation. Support should therefore focus on creating relationships and giving opportunities for conversations about changes within the families and difficult decisions, creating family or team support for those who need it.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Scientific Research Publishing, 2014
Keywords
Dementia, Family Relationships, Next of Kin, Qualitative Study
National Category
Humanities
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-22676 (URN)10.4236/ojn.2014.47055 (DOI)
Available from: 2014-08-27 Created: 2014-08-27 Last updated: 2018-10-12Bibliographically approved
Kjällman Alm, A., Hellzén, O. & Norbergh, K.-G. (2014). Experiences of long-term ongoing structured support in early stage of dementia – a case study. International Journal of Older People Nursing, 9(4), 289-297
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Experiences of long-term ongoing structured support in early stage of dementia – a case study
2014 (English)In: International Journal of Older People Nursing, ISSN 1748-3735, E-ISSN 1748-3743, Vol. 9, no 4, p. 289-297Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The prevalence of dementia diseases is increasing worldwide with advancing age and growing populations. In Sweden alone, which currently has a population of approximately 9 million, there are about 25, 000 persons diagnosed each year with a dementia disease. Consequently, after such a diagnosis there is a tremendous need for support not only in Sweden but other countries as well. The recipients of that support include next of kin who seek all sorts of information including conversations about upcoming lifestyle changes and ways to handle personality changes in their loved one who is suffering from dementia. The aim of this study was to explore four couples´ experiences in structured support groups. A single case study with multiple data collection methods was used. Semi-structured interviews were analyzed by content analysis, which revealed three main categories representing the findings in four cases: Kinship through shared experiences, Knowledge about the disease, and Sense of comfort and support. One category, Longing for kinship was created exclusively for one of the couples. Viewing the emerging categories from a healthy aging perspective, both comfort and support and kinship through shared experiences can be considered as components of larger themes of support and social interaction. Findings suggest that structured support groups are a good way to encourage discussions, allow persons with dementia to express themselves, and support healthy aging in partners. Facilitators, regardless of whether they are social workers or registered nurses, should be trained in the group process to enable the individuals in the group to communicate and find meaning in their experiences.

Keywords
Case study, Experiences, Dementia, Older people, Support groups
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-20627 (URN)10.1111/opn.12034 (DOI)23758956 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84911477518 (Scopus ID)
Note

Publ online 11 June 2013

Available from: 2013-12-11 Created: 2013-12-11 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
Lundahl, M.-K., Olovsson, K. J., Rönngren, Y. & Norbergh, K.-G. (2014). Nurse's perspectives on care provided for patients with gamma-hydroxybutyric acid and gamma-butyrolactone abuse. Journal of Clinical Nursing, 23(17-18), 2589-2598
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Nurse's perspectives on care provided for patients with gamma-hydroxybutyric acid and gamma-butyrolactone abuse
2014 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 23, no 17-18, p. 2589-2598Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aims and objectives To describe registered nurses' views and experiences providing care for gamma-hydroxybutyric acid and gamma-butyrolactone abuse inpatients in a psychiatric unit.

Background Gamma-hydroxybutyric acid and gamma-butyrolactone are illegal drugs with potentially fatal outcomes that are entering wider use in Scandinavia. Gamma-hydroxybutyric acid-dependent persons with withdrawal symptoms often require forceful withdrawal treatment provided in psychiatric units.

Design A qualitative study with a purposive sample including interviews from registered nurses.

Methods Data were collected from interviews with 15 registered nurses working in specialised dependency units in psychiatric wards. The data collected were analysed through a descriptive, qualitative analysis.

Results The registered nurses' narratives revealed four main areas of convergence: feelings of anxiety and despair, preparation for unpredictable and precarious situations, striving for good relationship and striving to optimise and develop nursing care. The interviews revealed that registered nurses reflect on and discuss their feelings about their patients' situations with colleagues; prepare themselves for potential aggressiveness and unpredictable situations; improve their care through conscious attitude adjustment and relationship-forming behaviours; and strive to increase their personal knowledge, maintain a hopeful outlook and exhibit a positive approach. These themes were found in all nine categories and sixteen subcategories.

Discussion The findings based on the registered nurses' narratives indicated that the registered nurses experienced their work situation when caring for these patients to be very complex and demanding.

Conclusion The study revealed that registered nurses worked extensively to craft their approach and attitude towards their patients. It is clear that registered nurses use themselves as tools or instruments for the creation of good relationships, thus providing the best care possible.

Relevance to clinical practice Registered nurses should be given more education, clearer guidelines and better guidance to assist them in facing such challenging and often problematic situations. One-on-one shadowing provides the possibility to create and develop relationship.

Keywords
Content analysis, Nurse-patient relationship, Psychiatric nursing, Qualitative study, Substance abuse
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-21180 (URN)10.1111/jocn.12475 (DOI)000339431300022 ()2-s2.0-84904594858 (Scopus ID)
Note

Publ online 25 Dec 2013

Available from: 2014-01-29 Created: 2014-01-29 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
Høgsnes, L., Melin-Johansson, C., Norbergh, K.-G. & Danielson, E. (2014). The existential life situations of spouses of persons with dementia before and after relocating to a nursing home. Aging & Mental Health, 18(2), 152-160
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The existential life situations of spouses of persons with dementia before and after relocating to a nursing home
2014 (English)In: Aging & Mental Health, ISSN 1360-7863, E-ISSN 1364-6915, Vol. 18, no 2, p. 152-160Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives: The aim was to describe the existential life situations of spouses who care for persons with dementia, before and after relocation to nursing homes.Method: This was a qualitative study among 11 spouses of persons with dementia, recruited via purposeful sampling. Data were collected through interviews and analysed with interpretive content analysis.Results: Before the relocation to nursing homes, the spouses' existential life situations were characterized by feelings of shame and guilt, being isolated in the home. Spouses were also exposed to psychological threats, physical violence, and had feelings of placing one's own needs last. After the relocation, spouses described feelings of guilt and freedom, living with grief and thoughts of death, feelings of loneliness in the spousal relationship, and striving for acceptance despite a lack of completion.Conclusion: The existential life situation of spouses of persons with dementia is about being in limit situations which changes when the ill person relocates to a nursing home. This is important knowledge for health care staff to bear in mind at nursing homes when encountering spouses.

Keywords
dementia, existential, nursing homes, spouses
National Category
Nursing Geriatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-22001 (URN)10.1080/13607863.2013.818100 (DOI)000330164500004 ()2-s2.0-84893931772 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2014-06-04 Created: 2014-05-28 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
Kjällman Alm, A. & Norbergh, K.-G. (2013). Nurses' opinions of pain and the assessed need for pain medication for the elderly. Pain Management Nursing, 14(2), e31-e38
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Nurses' opinions of pain and the assessed need for pain medication for the elderly
2013 (English)In: Pain Management Nursing, ISSN 1524-9042, E-ISSN 1532-8635, Vol. 14, no 2, p. e31-e38Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The undertreatment of pain in the elderly living in nursing homes is a significant problem. In Swedish nursing homes, the registered nurse on duty is often responsible for 20-40 patients during the day with no daily contact from attending physicians. The aim of this study was to investigate the opinions of registered nurses regarding pain and the assessed need for pain medication for elderly patients using patient scenarios. Two patient scenarios were used in this study; a questionnaire and background information was provided. The scenarios consisted of one smiling patient and one grimacing patient, both with the same numeric rating scale value of pain, blood pressure, pulse rate, and respiration rate. Three questions regarding pain assessment and management followed the scenarios. The questionnaire was sent to all 128 registered nurses working daytime in elderly care in both municipal nursing homes and municipal home care in the mid-Sweden region. A total of 56 nurses participated, providing an answering frequency of 45%. Results showed that registered nurses with more experience did not have the same opinion about pain as the smiling patient and gave inadequate medication, which was not in accordance with recommendations from the county hospital and the World Health Organization. © 2013 American Society for Pain Management Nursing.

National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-19361 (URN)10.1016/j.pmn.2010.07.007 (DOI)23688369 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84878112296 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2013-08-26 Created: 2013-06-19 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
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