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Mehtiyeva, A. & Prince, S. (2020). Journeys of research, emotions and belonging: an exploratory analysis of the motivations and experience of ancestral tourists. Scandinavian Journal of Hospitality and Tourism, 20(1), 85-103
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Journeys of research, emotions and belonging: an exploratory analysis of the motivations and experience of ancestral tourists
2020 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Hospitality and Tourism, ISSN 1502-2250, E-ISSN 1502-2269, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 85-103Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Ancestral tourism and amateur genealogy are popular phenomena, driving members of diasporas to reconnect with their ancestral roots and discover family histories. Tourism researchers have not yet paid much attention to Scandinavian countries as ancestral destinations. After waves of emigration, there are now millions of individuals with Scandinavian roots in countries like the United States. We explore the demand-side of American ancestral tourism to Sweden. Our findings stem from nine interviews with Swedish-Americans who have been ancestral tourists in Sweden. Ancestral tourists live highly emotional experiences dependent on factors occurring prior to and during travels and involving many sites and stakeholders beyond the control of the destination. Our study reveals the importance for ancestral tourists of establishing a network of allies through genealogy research for their experience in Sweden to be positive. The accumulation of family memories and of information gained through genealogy research makes ancestral travels to Sweden a highly personal endeavor, rather than an elusive reconnection to a distant heritage. Yet reconnecting with the ancestral homeland and establishing a sense of belonging to its society also matters to these tourists, though cultural stereotypes influence this experience. We conclude with recommendations for destination development and future research. 

Keywords
Amateur genealogy, diaspora tourism, heritage tourism, Scandinavian emigration, thematic narrative analysis
National Category
Other Social Sciences not elsewhere specified
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-38651 (URN)10.1080/15022250.2020.1728376 (DOI)000514495700001 ()2-s2.0-85079716565 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2020-03-16 Created: 2020-03-16 Last updated: 2020-03-16Bibliographically approved
Prince, S. & Chekalina, T. (2019). Besökarundersökning i Tivedens nationalpark sommaren 2018: En studie av nationalparksbesökare i Tivedens nationalpark samt i det omkringliggande Tivedenområdet. Mid Sweden University
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Besökarundersökning i Tivedens nationalpark sommaren 2018: En studie av nationalparksbesökare i Tivedens nationalpark samt i det omkringliggande Tivedenområdet
2019 (Swedish)Report (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Mid Sweden University, 2019. p. 112
Series
Rapportserien / European Tourism Research Institute, ISSN 1403-4220 ; 2019:1
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-38146 (URN)978-91-88527-97-4 (ISBN)
Available from: 2019-12-18 Created: 2019-12-18 Last updated: 2019-12-19Bibliographically approved
Prince, S. (2019). Clay, glass and everyday life: Craft-artists’ embodiment in the tourist landscape. In: Catherine Palmer, Hazel Andrews (Ed.), Tourism and Embodiment: (pp. 172-186). Taylor & Francis Group
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Clay, glass and everyday life: Craft-artists’ embodiment in the tourist landscape
2019 (English)In: Tourism and Embodiment / [ed] Catherine Palmer, Hazel Andrews, Taylor & Francis Group, 2019, p. 172-186Chapter in book (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Tourism is a significant part of the everyday life of those who dwell within toured landscapes and exists through mundane performance, unreflexive habits and everyday technologies. In a study of the craft-artists of Bornholm, Denmark, I describe the tourist landscape as a realm of dwelling where human activities weave themselves in the environment through processes of embodiment. The encounters between the tourists and the craft-artists are largely defined by the way these craft-artists dwell on their island and by the material properties and techniques used to turn clay and glass into artistic creations. This demonstrates the central positions materials have in shaping the tourist landscape. The cultural landscape, as a realm of mundane embodied practices, thus cannot be detached from the landscape that tourists encounter. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis Group, 2019
National Category
Other Social Sciences not elsewhere specified
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-38234 (URN)10.4324/9780203701539-12 (DOI)2-s2.0-85076320301 (Scopus ID)9780203701539 (ISBN)
Note

eBook Published 23 July 2019

Available from: 2020-01-15 Created: 2020-01-15 Last updated: 2020-01-15Bibliographically approved
Prince, S. (2019). Dwelling and tourism: Embracing the non-representational in the tourist landscape. Landscape research, 44(6), 731-742
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Dwelling and tourism: Embracing the non-representational in the tourist landscape
2019 (English)In: Landscape research, ISSN 0142-6397, E-ISSN 1469-9710, Vol. 44, no 6, p. 731-742Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The dwelling perspective outlines that landscapes are the product ofembodied actions and practices. Landscape scholars studying tourismand tourism scholars studying landscapes have neglected to apply thisperspective to local realities. Tourism most often represents an activity tointegrate to the landscape, rather than a complex socio-spatial phenomenon.When embodiments are studied, it is generally to speak of thetourist experience. I propose using the dwelling perspective to infusetourist landscapes with the non-representational ethos of materiality andembodiment. My proposition acknowledges the socio-cultural complexitiesthat the tourist system imposes on local people, and addresseslandscape as a material realm where there is constant interplay betweenlocalised practices and tourism dynamics. This perspective centres scientificconversations on the complex, yet mundane, experience of inhabitingtourist landscapes. Scholars should consider the impacts of tourismon living spaces as they contribute to the formation of language influencingplanners and politicians.

Keywords
the dwelling perspective, tourist landscape, materiality, non-representational theories, discursive anchor
National Category
Human Geography Other Social Sciences not elsewhere specified
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-34466 (URN)10.1080/01426397.2018.1518520 (DOI)000478083800006 ()2-s2.0-85053524754 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-09-21 Created: 2018-09-21 Last updated: 2019-08-15Bibliographically approved
Wall-Reinius, S., Prince, S. & Dahlberg, A. (2019). Everyday life in a magnificent landscape: Making sense of the nature/culture dichotomy in the mountains of Jämtland, Sweden. Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space, 2(1), 3-22
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Everyday life in a magnificent landscape: Making sense of the nature/culture dichotomy in the mountains of Jämtland, Sweden
2019 (English)In: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space, ISSN 2514-8486, Vol. 2, no 1, p. 3-22Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Although the nature/culture dichotomy has been extensively criticized by scholars, it remains pervasive to our conception of the world. Discourses of nature as a pristine milieu and of culture as a realm of human dominance not only impact cognition, but also the local practices of those involved daily in such contested areas. In this study of the mountainous area of the Jämtland County, Sweden, we report on the ways local stakeholders make sense of their surrounding landscape in the wake of its magnificent character as they go about their daily lives as residents, entrepreneurs and recreationists. We turn to the notion of dwelling to frame these narratives. This ultimately becomes an exploration of the contradictions and confusions within and between the discourses of conservation, management, recreation, authenticity and tourism development that affect how local stakeholders consciously and subconsciously cope with the tensions brought about by the nature/culture dichotomy. The findings are used to propose a critical, as well as constructive, notion of dwelling that stresses the importance of opening up to new possibilities and responsibilities during negotiations over protected areas.

Keywords
Dwelling, nature conservation, landscape research, national park, tourism development
National Category
Human Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-35664 (URN)10.1177/2514848619825988 (DOI)
Available from: 2019-02-19 Created: 2019-02-19 Last updated: 2019-03-11Bibliographically approved
Wall-Reinius, S., Prince, S. & Dahlberg, A. (2019). The Everyday in a Contested Landscape Making sense of conservation, tourism and local development in the mountains of Jämtland, Sweden. In: : . Paper presented at The 8th Nordic Geographers Meeting in Trondheim, Norway, June 16–19, 2019.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Everyday in a Contested Landscape Making sense of conservation, tourism and local development in the mountains of Jämtland, Sweden
2019 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Discourses of nature as a pristine milieu and of culture as a realm of human dominance not only impact cognition, but also the local practices of those involved daily in such contested areas. In this paper, we turn to local actors and how they experience and practice everyday life in a landscape that is influenced by nature conservation and tourism ideals in the wake of the nature/culture dualism. We draw mainly from two theoretical fields; the nature/culture dualism understood as social constructs and discourses on the social and the natural in the landscape; and, the notion of dwelling where everyday habits and experiences produce a living space, which in this case is contrasted to the perception of magnificent and pristine landscapes. Through our study of the Jämtland Mountains (Sweden), we have analysed local understandings of a landscape that is ordinary on the one hand, and magnificent on the other. We report on the ways local stakeholders make sense of their surrounding landscape as they go about their daily lives as residents, reindeer herders, entrepreneurs, and recreationists. Ultimately, this becomes an exploration of the contradictions and confusions within and between the discourses of conservation, management, recreation, authenticity, and tourism development that affect how local stakeholders consciously and subconsciously cope with the tensions brought about by the nature/culture dichotomy. The findings are used to propose a critical, as well as constructive, notion of dwelling that stresses the importance of opening up to new possibilities and responsibilities during negotiations over protected areas.

National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-38110 (URN)
Conference
The 8th Nordic Geographers Meeting in Trondheim, Norway, June 16–19, 2019
Available from: 2019-12-16 Created: 2019-12-16 Last updated: 2019-12-19Bibliographically approved
Prince, S. (2019). Volunteer tourism and the eco-village: Finding the host in the pedagogic experience. Hospitality & Society, 9(1), 71-89
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Volunteer tourism and the eco-village: Finding the host in the pedagogic experience
2019 (English)In: Hospitality & Society, ISSN 2042-7913, E-ISSN 2042-7921, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 71-89Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The pedagogical dimension of volunteer tourism (VT) is often used to position volunteering as an alternative form of tourism. Many researchers seeking to understand the expansion and benefits of VT have approached the practice through the frameworks of transformative learning and global citizenship education. These forms of education have been criticized by pedagogy and tourism scholars alike as they reproduce an elitist neo-liberal system that positions the needs and desires of volunteers before those of host-community members. The case of Sólheimar eco-village, Iceland, is used to explore the role of the host-community during volunteer tourist experiences aimed at fostering global citizenship. While it is observed that the needs of volunteers are often prioritized, the community members of the eco-village are nonetheless significant actors in the transformative education process of these volunteers. The ability of community-members to provoke reflection amongst volunteers over their complex position as members (albeit transient) of an eco-village represents a form of learning based in critical thinking. By acknowledging the role of the host during VT encounters, researchers can avoid fixing the meaning of transformative learning and global citizenship in ways that reproduce volunteer-centric discourses.

Keywords
host-community, critical pedagogy, transformative learning, global citizenship, focused ethnography, alternative space
National Category
Human Geography Other Social Sciences not elsewhere specified
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-35765 (URN)10.1386/hosp.9.1.71_1 (DOI)000460143500005 ()2-s2.0-85070381688 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-03-08 Created: 2019-03-08 Last updated: 2019-08-20Bibliographically approved
Prince, S. (2018). Book Review: Femininities in the field: Tourism and transdisciplinary research [Review]. Tourism Geographies, 20(4), 753-755
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Book Review: Femininities in the field: Tourism and transdisciplinary research
2018 (English)In: Tourism Geographies, ISSN 1461-6688, E-ISSN 1470-1340, Vol. 20, no 4, p. 753-755Article, book review (Refereed) Published
National Category
Other Social Sciences not elsewhere specified Human Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-34755 (URN)10.1080/14616688.2018.1485177 (DOI)000452008500015 ()
Available from: 2018-10-23 Created: 2018-10-23 Last updated: 2019-01-08Bibliographically approved
Prince, S. (2018). Book Review: Practical Tourism Research (2nd edition) [Review]. Journal of Tourism and Cultural Change, 16(3), 332-333
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Book Review: Practical Tourism Research (2nd edition)
2018 (English)In: Journal of Tourism and Cultural Change, ISSN 1476-6825, E-ISSN 1747-7654, Vol. 16, no 3, p. 332-333Article, book review (Refereed) Published
National Category
Other Social Sciences not elsewhere specified
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-33683 (URN)10.1080/14766825.2017.1364536 (DOI)000432209900009 ()ETOUR (Local ID)ETOUR (Archive number)ETOUR (OAI)
Available from: 2018-05-31 Created: 2018-05-31 Last updated: 2018-11-26Bibliographically approved
Prince, S. (2018). Book Review: The rise of thana-capitalism and tourism [Review]. Annals of Leisure Research, 21(2), 257-258
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Book Review: The rise of thana-capitalism and tourism
2018 (English)In: Annals of Leisure Research, ISSN 1174-5398, Vol. 21, no 2, p. 257-258Article, book review (Refereed) Published
National Category
Other Social Sciences not elsewhere specified
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-33299 (URN)10.1080/11745398.2017.1353918 (DOI)000424346100011 ()ETOUR (Local ID)ETOUR (Archive number)ETOUR (OAI)
Available from: 2018-03-19 Created: 2018-03-19 Last updated: 2018-10-23Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-0471-3748

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