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Melin-Johansson, ChristinaORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-9623-5813
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Publications (10 of 51) Show all publications
Melin-Johansson, C., Palmqvist, R. & Rönnberg, L. (2017). Clinical intuition in the nursing process and decision-making: A mixed studies review. Journal of Clinical Nursing, 26(23-24), 3936-3949
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Clinical intuition in the nursing process and decision-making: A mixed studies review
2017 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 26, no 23-24, p. 3936-3949Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aims and objectives

To review what is characteristic of registered nurses’ intuition in clinical settings, in relationships and in the nursing process.

Background

Intuition is a controversial concept and nurses believe that there are difficulties in how they should explain their nursing actions or decisions based on intuition. Much of the evidence from the body of research indicates that nurses value their intuition in a variety of clinical settings. More information on how nurses integrate intuition as a core element in daily clinical work would contribute to an improved understanding on how they go about this. Intuition deserves a place in evidence-based activities, where intuition is an important component associated with the nursing process.

Design

An integrative review strengthened with a mixed-studies review.

Methods

Literature searches were conducted in the databases CINAHL, PubMed and PsycINFO, and literature published 1985–2016 were included. The findings in the studies were analysed with content analysis, and the synthesis process entailed a reasoning between the authors.

Results

After a quality assessment, 16 studies were included. The analysis and synthesis resulted in three categories. The characteristics of intuition in the nurse's daily clinical activities include application, assertiveness and experiences; in the relationships with patients’ intuition include unique connections, mental and bodily responses, and personal qualities; and in the nursing process include support and guidance, component and clues in decision-making, and validating decisions.

Conclusion

Intuition is more than simply a “gut feeling,” and it is a process based on knowledge and care experience and has a place beside research-based evidence. Nurses integrate both analysis and synthesis of intuition alongside objective data when making decisions. They should rely on their intuition and use this knowledge in clinical practice as a support in decision-making, which increases the quality and safety of patient care.

Relevance to clinical practice

We find that intuition plays a key role in more or less all of the steps in the nursing process as a base for decision-making that supports safe patient care, and is a validated component of nursing clinical care expertise.

Keywords
Clinical decision-making, Literature review, Nursing, Nursing process, Review
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-29778 (URN)10.1111/jocn.13814 (DOI)000416319600016 ()2-s2.0-85021259943 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-12-22 Created: 2016-12-22 Last updated: 2018-02-28Bibliographically approved
Henoch, I., Melin-Johansson, C., Bergh, I., Strang, S., Ek, K., Hammarlund, K., . . . Browall, M. (2017). Undergraduate nursing students' attitudes and preparedness toward caring for dying persons – a longitudinal study. Nurse Education in Practice, 26, 12-20
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Undergraduate nursing students' attitudes and preparedness toward caring for dying persons – a longitudinal study
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2017 (English)In: Nurse Education in Practice, ISSN 1471-5953, E-ISSN 1873-5223, Vol. 26, p. 12-20Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Nursing education needs to prepare students for care of dying patients. The aim of this study was to describe the development of nursing students' attitudes toward caring for dying patients and their perceived preparedness to perform end-of-life care. A longitudinal study was performed with 117 nursing students at six universities in Sweden. The students completed the Frommelt Attitude Toward Care of the Dying Scale (FATCOD) questionnaire at the beginning of first and second year, and at the end of third year of education. After education, the students completed questions about how prepared they felt by to perform end-of-life care. The total FATCOD increased from 126 to 132 during education. Five weeks' theoretical palliative care education significantly predicted positive changes in attitudes toward caring for dying patients. Students with five weeks' theoretical palliative care training felt more prepared and supported by the education to care for a dying patient than students with shorter education. A minority felt prepared to take care of a dead body or meet relatives.

Keywords
attitudes, FATCOD, longitudinal, nurse education, palliative care education
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-29780 (URN)10.1016/j.nepr.2017.06.007 (DOI)000412249800004 ()28648955 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85021136719 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-12-22 Created: 2016-12-22 Last updated: 2017-12-08Bibliographically approved
Haas, B. K., Hermanns, M. & Melin-Johansson, C. (2016). Case study of persons with cancer participating in a community-based exercise program: An exploration of meaning and change. Qualitative Report, 21(8), 1409-1424, Article ID 5.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Case study of persons with cancer participating in a community-based exercise program: An exploration of meaning and change
2016 (English)In: Qualitative Report, ISSN 1052-0147, Vol. 21, no 8, p. 1409-1424, article id 5Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Increasingly, research supports the importance of incorporating exercise into the cancer care paradigm. While quantitative studies have substantiated the significant effects of exercise on physical functioning, the individual’s perspective of participating in an exercise program has rarely been considered. The purpose of this study was to explain the impact of a community based exercise program on the lives of persons with cancer and their caregivers. Based on Bandura’s Social Cognitive Theory, a single explanatory case study with multiple embedded units of analyses was conducted. Interviews were conducted with 10 individuals representing participants with cancer, their caregivers, and health care providers. Data were analyzed using Yin’s case study method. Four themes emerged (Sense of Community, Building Relationships, Bridging the Gap, and Living Life Abundantly), which identified the unique characteristics of this community based exercise program. Incorporation of these characteristics into program planning may benefit other communities that aspire to offer a similar program to improve patient outcomes and enhance quality of life. © 2016: Barbara K. Haas, Melinda Hermanns, Christina Melin-Johansson, and Nova Southeastern University.

Keywords
Cancer, Case Study, Community-based, Exercise
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-28801 (URN)2-s2.0-84981543728 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-09-16 Created: 2016-09-16 Last updated: 2018-02-27Bibliographically approved
Hagelin, C. L., Johansson Melin, C. [., Henoch, I., Bergh, I., Ek, K., Hammarlund, K., . . . Browall, M. (2016). Factors influencing attitude toward care of dying patients in first-year nursing students. International Journal of Palliative Nursing, 22(1), 28-36
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Factors influencing attitude toward care of dying patients in first-year nursing students
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2016 (English)In: International Journal of Palliative Nursing, ISSN 1357-6321, E-ISSN 2052-286X, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 28-36Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim: To describe Swedish first-year undergraduate nursing students' attitudes toward care of dying patients. Possible influences such as age, earlier care experiences, care education, experiences of meeting dying patients and place of birth were investigated. Method: The Frommelt Attitude Toward Care of the Dying Scale (FATCOD) was used in six universities. Descriptive statistics and regression analysis were used. Results: Some 371 students (67.3%) reported overall positive attitude toward caring for dying patients (total mean FATCOD 119.5, SD 10.6) early in their first semester. Older students, students with both earlier care experience and earlier education, those with experience of meeting a dying person, and students born in Sweden reported the highest scores, a more positive attitude. Conclusion: Age, earlier care experience and education, experiences of meeting a dying person and place of birth seems to affect students' attitudes toward care of the dying and need to be considered among nursing educators.

National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-29808 (URN)10.12968/ijpn.2016.22.1.28 (DOI)000389316300006 ()26804954 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84960500345 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-01-02 Created: 2017-01-02 Last updated: 2017-08-10Bibliographically approved
Høgsnes, L., Danielson, E., Norbergh, K.-G. & Melin-Johansson, C. (2016). Healthcare professionals' documentation in nursing homes when caring for patients with dementia in end of life - a retrospective records review. Journal of Clinical Nursing, 25(11-12), 1663-1673
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Healthcare professionals' documentation in nursing homes when caring for patients with dementia in end of life - a retrospective records review
2016 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 25, no 11-12, p. 1663-1673Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aims and objectives: To investigate how end-of-life care was described by healthcare professionals in records of deceased persons affected by dementia who had lived in Swedish nursing homes. Background: In the final stage of dementia disease, the persons are often cared for at nursing homes and they often die there. The research concurs that a palliative approach to end-of-life care is essential but there are still some limitations regarding research about what constitutes the end-of-life care provided to persons affected by dementia in Sweden. Design: Descriptive qualitative method with a retrospective approach. Method: Nursing records (n = 50) and medical records (n = 50) were retrospectively reviewed in two nursing homes. The analysis was conducted using deductive and inductive content analysis. Three phases of The Liverpool Care Pathway; Initial assessment, Continuous assessment and Follow-up, were used deductively to first sort the text in the records, then the text in each phase was further analysed with inductive content analysis. Four categories and 11 subcategories described the content in the records. Results: The end-of-life care was described in the healthcare records based on such categories as decision-making, participation and communication, assessment and prevention of symptom and following up after the residents had died. Conclusion: Paticularly, physical symptoms were documented and, to a lesser degree, psychological or existential/spiritual needs. Relevance to clinical practice: Healthcare professionals must have a holistic view of the person affected by dementia during the end-of-life care and, according to this study, more focus must be placed on their psychosocial and existential needs in the documentation of end-of-life care.

Keywords
Dementia, Documentation, End of life, Palliative care, Patient records
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-27839 (URN)10.1111/jocn.13184 (DOI)000375866200018 ()27139172 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84964777712 (Scopus ID)
Note

Article

Available from: 2016-06-09 Created: 2016-06-09 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
Ulff, E., Melin-Johansson, C., Maroti, M. & Koinberg, I. (2016). How Patient Involvement Can Contribute to the Development of Information Materials About Malignant Melanoma for Healthy Older Men. Home Health Care Management & Practice, 28(1), 9-17
Open this publication in new window or tab >>How Patient Involvement Can Contribute to the Development of Information Materials About Malignant Melanoma for Healthy Older Men
2016 (English)In: Home Health Care Management & Practice, ISSN 1084-8223, E-ISSN 1552-6739, Vol. 28, no 1, p. 9-17Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The incidence for malignant melanoma (MM) in older men is 3 to 4 times higher than the rest of the population. Patient information about MM could be a way to reach men. The aim of the study was to design and develop a pamphlet in collaboration with older men. The study was conducted in two steps. In the first step, 73 men were interviewed; in the second step, the pamphlets were sent out to 306 men. All men were recruited in connection with an aorta screening. Men wanted concisely written information with illustrations and 85% of the men reported that they have read the pamphlet. The study demonstrates a cost-effective method to reach out with information to older men about MM.

National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-26682 (URN)10.1177/1084822315593075 (DOI)
External cooperation:
Note

Publ online 19 July 2015

Available from: 2015-12-20 Created: 2015-12-20 Last updated: 2017-12-01Bibliographically approved
Martinsson, L., Axelsson, B. & Melin-Johansson, C. (2016). Patients' perspectives on information from physicians during palliative chemotherapy: A qualitative study. Palliative & Supportive Care, 14(5), 495-502
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Patients' perspectives on information from physicians during palliative chemotherapy: A qualitative study
2016 (English)In: Palliative & Supportive Care, ISSN 1478-9515, E-ISSN 1478-9523, Vol. 14, no 5, p. 495-502Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVE:

During the course of their disease, patients with cancer receiving palliative chemotherapy receive extensive amounts of information from physicians. The objective of our study was to describe patients' perspectives on the information they received from physicians during palliative chemotherapy with regard to their cancer diagnosis, treatments, prognosis, and future planning.

METHOD:

A total of 15 semistructured face-to-face interviews with patients who had incurable cancer were conducted, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed with qualitative content analysis.

RESULTS:

Three categories were defined during the analytical process: "having a chronic disease," "depending on chemotherapy," and "living with an unpredictable future."

SIGNIFICANCE OF RESULTS:

Our study demonstrated that patients undergoing palliative chemotherapy perceived that their disease was incurable and chronic, that they were dependent on chemotherapy, and that their future was uncertain. Compared with other studies, the patients in our study seemed to be more aware of their prognosis and the goals of care.

Keywords
Cancer, Chemotherapy, Communication, Disclosure, Palliative care
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-26677 (URN)10.1017/S1478951515001200 (DOI)000384433900008 ()26653583 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84949765158 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2015-12-20 Created: 2015-12-20 Last updated: 2017-12-01Bibliographically approved
Melin-Johansson, C., Lindström, L., Uski, R. & Björkman-Randström, K. (2016). “The elephant on the table”: spirituality at the workplace in healthcare – a mixed studies review.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>“The elephant on the table”: spirituality at the workplace in healthcare – a mixed studies review
2016 (English)Article in journal (Refereed) Accepted
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-29776 (URN)
Available from: 2016-12-22 Created: 2016-12-22 Last updated: 2017-02-16Bibliographically approved
Høgsnes, L., Norbergh, K.-G., Danielson, E. & Melin Johansson, C. (2016). The Shift in Existential Life situation of Adult Children to Parents with Dementia Relocated to Nursing Homes. Open Nursing Journal, 10, 122-130
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Shift in Existential Life situation of Adult Children to Parents with Dementia Relocated to Nursing Homes
2016 (English)In: Open Nursing Journal, ISSN 1874-4346, E-ISSN 1874-4346, Vol. 10, p. 122-130Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background:

Previous research describes spouses and adult children of people with dementia as a homogeneous group using one term: family caregivers. Recent research shows that the needs and experiences of spouses and adult children differ, therefore they cannot be studied as a homogeneous group.

Aims:

The aim of the study was to describe the shift in existential life situations of adult children of a parent with dementia relocated to nursing homes.

Design:

This is a qualitative study with an interpretive approach.

Methods:

Face-to-face interviews were held with 11 adult children aged 48-65 years. The interviews lasted 30–60 minutes and data were analysed using interpretive content analysis.

Findings:

The adult children described how they experienced their life situation before and after their parents’ relocation. Before relocation they described feelings of powerlessness, loneliness in their responsibilities, loss and guilt. After relocation they had feelings of freedom, ongoing responsibility, living with loss and having a new relationship with death.

Conclusion:

The most important finding in our study was that adult children developed a different relationship with death than before the parent became affected by dementia. It is essential that healthcare staff understand and address the adult children’s existential life situations and the suffering they are experiencing. Healthcare staff need to be conscious about adult children’s needs for support to address their existential life situations before and after their parents relocate to nursing homes.

Keywords
Adult Children, Dementia, Existential, Nursing Homes, Qualitative Methods
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-29366 (URN)10.2174/1874434601610010122 (DOI)2-s2.0-85032090284 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-11-30 Created: 2016-11-30 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
Melin-Johansson, C. (2015). Parents' experiences of palliative care and support when their child is dying. In: : . Paper presented at 6th International Carer conference, Gothenburg..
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Parents' experiences of palliative care and support when their child is dying
2015 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Refereed)
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-26694 (URN)
Conference
6th International Carer conference, Gothenburg.
Available from: 2015-12-20 Created: 2015-12-20 Last updated: 2016-09-29Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-9623-5813

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