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Holmberg, Hans-ChristerORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-3814-6246
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Publications (10 of 373) Show all publications
Sperlich, B., Aminian, K., Düking, P. & Holmberg, H.-C. (2020). Editorial: Wearable Sensor Technology for Monitoring Training Load and Health in the Athletic Population. Frontiers in Physiology, 10, Article ID 1520.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Editorial: Wearable Sensor Technology for Monitoring Training Load and Health in the Athletic Population
2020 (English)In: Frontiers in Physiology, ISSN 1664-042X, E-ISSN 1664-042X, Vol. 10, article id 1520Article in journal, Editorial material (Refereed) Published
Keywords
biofeedback, data analysis, digital health, innovation, monitoring, personalized medicine, sensor, wearables
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-38350 (URN)10.3389/fphys.2019.01520 (DOI)000508443700001 ()2-s2.0-85078275756 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2020-02-03 Created: 2020-02-03 Last updated: 2020-02-19Bibliographically approved
Morales-Alamo, D., Martinez-Canton, M., Gelabert-Rebato, M., Martin-Rincon, M., de Pablos-Velasco, P., Holmberg, H.-C. & Calbet, J. A. L. (2020). Sarcolipin expression in human skeletal muscle: Influence of energy balance and exercise. Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, 30(3), 408-420
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sarcolipin expression in human skeletal muscle: Influence of energy balance and exercise
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2020 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 30, no 3, p. 408-420Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Sarcolipin (SLN) is a SERCA uncoupling protein associated with exercise performance and lower adiposity in mice. To determine SLN protein expression in human skeletal muscle and its relationship with adiposity, resting energy expenditure (REE), and performance, SLN was assessed by Western blot in 199 biopsies from two previous studies. In one study, 15 overweight volunteers underwent a pretest followed by 4 days of caloric restriction and exercise (45-minute one-arm cranking + 8-hour walking), and 3 days on a control diet. Muscle biopsies were obtained from the trained and non-exercised deltoid, and vastus lateralis (VL). In another study, 16 men performed seven sessions of 4-6 x 30-sec all-out sprints on the cycle ergometer with both limbs, and their VL and triceps brachii biopsied pre- and post-training. SLN expression was twofold and 44% higher in the VL than in the deltoids and triceps brachii, respectively. SLN was associated with neither adiposity nor REE, and was not altered by a severe energy deficit (5500 kcal/day). SLN and cortisol changes after the energy deficit were correlated (r = .38, P = .039). SLN was not altered by low-intensity exercise in the overweight subjects, whereas it was reduced after sprint training in the other group. The changes in SLN with sprint training were inversely associated with the changes in gross efficiency (r = -.59, P = .016). No association was observed between aerobic or anaerobic performance and SLN expression. In conclusion, sarcolipin appears to play no role in regulating the fat mass of men. Sprint training reduces sarcolipin expression, which may improve muscle efficiency.

Keywords
exercise, obesity, resting energy expenditure, sarcolipin, sprint training
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-38243 (URN)10.1111/sms.13594 (DOI)000500738600001 ()31674694 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2020-01-16 Created: 2020-01-16 Last updated: 2020-02-17Bibliographically approved
Kunz, P., Engel, F. A., Holmberg, H.-C. & Sperlich, B. (2019). A Meta-Comparison of the Effects of High-Intensity Interval Training to Those of Small-Sided Games and Other Training Protocols on Parameters Related to the Physiology and Performance of Youth Soccer Players. Sports Medicine - Open, 5(1), Article ID 7.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A Meta-Comparison of the Effects of High-Intensity Interval Training to Those of Small-Sided Games and Other Training Protocols on Parameters Related to the Physiology and Performance of Youth Soccer Players
2019 (English)In: Sports Medicine - Open, ISSN 2199-1170, Vol. 5, no 1, article id 7Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: High-intensity interval training (HIIT) is frequently employed to improve the endurance of various types of athletes. To determine whether youth soccer players may benefit from the intermittent load and time efficiency of HIIT, we performed a meta-analysis of the relevant scientific literature. Objectives: Our primary objective was to compare changes in various physiological parameters related to the performance of youth soccer players in response to running-based HIIT to the effects of other common training protocols (i.e., small-sided games, technical training and soccer-specific training, or high-volume endurance training). A secondary objective was to compare specifically running-based HIIT to a soccer-specific form of HIIT known as small-sided games (SSG) in this same respect, since this latter type of training is being discussed extensively by coaches. Method: A systematic search of the PubMed, SPORTDiscus, and Web of Science databases was performed in August of 2017 and updated during the review process in December of 2018. The criteria for inclusion of articles for analysis were as follows: (1) comparison of HIIT to SSG or some other training protocol employing a pre-post design, (2) involvement of healthy young athletes (≤ 18 years old), and (3) assessment of variables related to endurance or soccer performance. Hedges’ g effect size (dppc2) and associated 95% confidence intervals for the comparison of the responses to HIIT and other interventions were calculated. Results: Nine studies, involving 232 young soccer players (mean age 16.2 ± 1.6 years), were examined. Endurance training in the form of HIIT or SSG produced similar positive effects on most parameters assessed, including peak oxygen uptake and maximal running performance during incremental running (expressed as Vmax or maximal aerobic speed (MAS)), shuttle runs (expressed as the distance covered or time to exhaustion), and time-trials, as well as submaximal variables such as running economy and running velocity at the lactate threshold. HIIT induced a moderate improvement in soccer-related tests involving technical exercises with the soccer ball and other game-specific parameters (i.e., total distance covered, number of sprints, and number of involvements with the ball). Neuromuscular parameters were largely unaffected by HIIT or SSG. Conclusion: The present meta-analysis indicates that HIIT and SSG have equally beneficial impacts on variables related to the endurance and soccer-specific performance of youth soccer players, but little influence on neuromuscular performance. 

Keywords
Adolescents, Children, Conditioning, Endurance, Repeated sprint
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-37308 (URN)10.1186/s40798-019-0180-5 (DOI)2-s2.0-85072073477 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-09-24 Created: 2019-09-24 Last updated: 2019-09-24Bibliographically approved
Psilander, N., Eftestøl, E., Cumming, K. T., Juvkam, I., Ekblom, M. M., Sunding, K., . . . Gundersen, K. (2019). Effects of training, detraining, and retraining on strength, hypertrophy, and myonuclear number in human skeletal muscle. Journal of applied physiology, 126(6), 1636-1645
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of training, detraining, and retraining on strength, hypertrophy, and myonuclear number in human skeletal muscle
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2019 (English)In: Journal of applied physiology, ISSN 8750-7587, E-ISSN 1522-1601, Vol. 126, no 6, p. 1636-1645Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Previously trained mouse muscles acquire strength and volume faster than naïve muscles; it has been suggested that this is related to increased myonuclear density. The present study aimed to determine whether a previously strength-trained leg (mem-leg) would respond better to a period of strength training than a previously untrained leg (con-leg). Nine men and 10 women performed unilateral strength training (T1) for 10 wk, followed by 20 wk of detraining (DT) and a 5-wk bilateral retraining period (T2). Muscle biopsies were taken before and after each training period and analyzed for myonuclear number, fiber volume, and cross-sectional area (CSA). Ultrasound and one repetition of maximum leg extension were performed to determine muscle thickness (MT) and strength. CSA (~17%), MT (~10%), and strength (~20%) increased during T1 in the mem-leg. However, the myonuclear number and fiber volume did not change. MT and CSA returned to baseline values during DT, but strength remained elevated (~60%), supporting previous findings of a long-lasting motor learning effect. MT and strength increased similarly in the mem-leg and con-leg during T2, whereas CSA, fiber volume, and myonuclear number remained unaffected. In conclusion, training response during T2 did not differ between the mem-leg and con-leg. However, this does not discount the existence of human muscle memory, since no increase in the number of myonuclei was detected during T1 and no clear detraining effect was observed for cell size during DT; thus, the present data did not allow for a rigorous test of the muscle memory hypothesis. NEW & NOTEWORTHY If a long-lasting intramuscular memory exists in humans, this will affect strength-training advice for both athletes and the public. Based on animal experiments, we hypothesized that such a memory exists and that it is related to the myonuclear number. However, a period of unilateral strength training, followed by detraining, did not increase the myonuclear number. The training response, during a subsequent bilateral retraining period, was not enhanced in the previously trained leg. 

Keywords
CSA, Exercise, Motor learning, Muscle memory, Myonuclei
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-36706 (URN)10.1152/japplphysiol.00917.2018 (DOI)000471217500014 ()2-s2.0-85067636120 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-07-10 Created: 2019-07-10 Last updated: 2020-02-18Bibliographically approved
Martin-Rincon, M., Pérez-López, A., Morales-Alamo, D., Perez-Suarez, I., de Pablos-Velasco, P., Perez-Valera, M., . . . Calbet, J. A. (2019). Exercise mitigates the loss of muscle mass by attenuating the activation of autophagy during severe energy deficit. Nutrients, 11(11), Article ID 2824.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Exercise mitigates the loss of muscle mass by attenuating the activation of autophagy during severe energy deficit
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2019 (English)In: Nutrients, ISSN 2072-6643, E-ISSN 2072-6643, Vol. 11, no 11, article id 2824Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The loss of skeletal muscle mass with energy deficit is thought to be due to protein breakdown by the autophagy-lysosome and the ubiquitin-proteasome systems. We studied the main signaling pathways through which exercise can attenuate the loss of muscle mass during severe energy deficit (5500 kcal/day). Overweight men followed four days of caloric restriction (3.2 kcal/kg body weight day) and prolonged exercise (45 min of one-arm cranking and 8 h walking/day), and three days of control diet and restricted exercise, with an intra-subject design including biopsies from muscles submitted to distinct exercise volumes. Gene expression and signaling data indicate that the main catabolic pathway activated during severe energy deficit in skeletal muscle is the autophagy-lysosome pathway, without apparent activation of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. Markers of autophagy induction and flux were reduced by exercise primarily in the muscle submitted to an exceptional exercise volume. Changes in signaling are associated with those in circulating cortisol, testosterone, cortisol/testosterone ratio, insulin, BCAA, and leucine. We conclude that exercise mitigates the loss of muscle mass by attenuating autophagy activation, blunting the phosphorylation of AMPK/ULK1/Beclin1, and leading to p62/SQSTM1 accumulation. This includes the possibility of inhibiting autophagy as a mechanism to counteract muscle loss in humans under severe energy deficit. 

Keywords
Autophagy-lysosome, Caloric restriction, Protein degradation, Skeletal muscle, Ubiquitin-proteasome
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-38191 (URN)10.3390/nu11112824 (DOI)000502274600275 ()31752260 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85075521170 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2020-01-08 Created: 2020-01-08 Last updated: 2020-01-16Bibliographically approved
Kunz, P., Zinner, C., Holmberg, H.-C. & Sperlich, B. (2019). Intra- and Post-match Time-Course of Indicators Related to Perceived and Performance Fatigability and Recovery in Elite Youth Soccer Players. Frontiers in Physiology, 10, Article ID 1383.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Intra- and Post-match Time-Course of Indicators Related to Perceived and Performance Fatigability and Recovery in Elite Youth Soccer Players
2019 (English)In: Frontiers in Physiology, ISSN 1664-042X, E-ISSN 1664-042X, Vol. 10, article id 1383Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: Our aims were to examine (i) the internal load during simulated soccer match-play by elite youth players; and (ii) the time-course of subsequent recovery from perceived and performance fatigability. Methods: Eleven male youth players (16 ± 1 years, 178 ± 7 cm, 67 ± 7 kg) participated in a 2 × 40-min simulated soccer match, completing 30 rounds (160 s each) with every round including multidirectional and linear sprinting (LS20m), jumping (CMJ) and running at different intensities. During each round, LS20m, CMJ, agility, heart rate (HR), oxygen uptake (VO2), energy expenditure (EE), substrate utilization and perceived exertion RPE were assessed. In addition, the blood level of lactate (Lac) was obtained after each of the five rounds. Creatine kinase (CK) concentration, maximal voluntary isometric knee extension and flexion, CMJ, number of skippings in 30 s, and subjective ratings on the Acute Recovery and Stress Scale (ARSS) were examined before and immediately, 24 and 48 h after the simulation. Results: During the game %HRpeak (p < 0.05, d = 1.08), %VO2peak (p < 0.05; d = 0.68), Lac (p < 0.05, d = 2.59), RPEtotal (p < 0.05, d = 4.59), and RPElegs (p < 0.05, d = 4.45) all increased with time during both halves (all p < 0.05). Agility improved (p < 0.05, d = 0.70) over the time-course of the game, with no changes in LS20m (p ≥ 0.05, d = 0.34) or CMJ (p ≥ 0.05, d = 0.27). EE was similar during both halves (528 ± 58 vs. 514 ± 61 kcal; p = 0.60; d = 0.23), with 62% (second half: 65%) carbohydrate, 9% (9%) protein and 26% (27%) fat utilization. With respect to recovery, maximal voluntary knee extension (p ≥ 0.05, d = 0.50) and flexion force (p ≥ 0.05, d = 0.19), CMJ (p ≥ 0.05, d = 0.13), number of ground contacts (p ≥ 0.05, d = 0.57) and average contact time (p ≥ 0.05, d = 0.39) during 30-s of skipping remained unaltered 24 and 48 h after the game. Most ARSS dimensions of load (p < 0.05, d = 3.79) and recovery (p < 0.05, d = 3.22) returned to baseline levels after 24 h of recovery. Relative to baseline values, CK was elevated immediately and 24 h after (p < 0.05, d = 2.03) and normalized 48 h later. Conclusion: In youth soccer players the simulated match evoked considerable circulatory, metabolic and perceptual load, with an EE of 1042 ± 118 kcal. Among the indicators of perceived and performance fatigability examined, the level of CK and certain subjective ratings differed considerably immediately following or 24–48 h after a 2 × 40-min simulated soccer match in comparison to baseline. Accordingly, monitoring these variables may assist coaches in assessing a U17 player’s perceived and performance fatigability in connection with scheduling training following a soccer match. 

Keywords
fatigue, intermittent exercise, match load, performance, soccer (football), youth
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-38207 (URN)10.3389/fphys.2019.01383 (DOI)000499903400001 ()31798459 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85076018279 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2020-01-10 Created: 2020-01-10 Last updated: 2020-01-16Bibliographically approved
Martin-Rincon, M., Perez-Suarez, I., Pérez-López, A., Ponce-González, J. G., Morales-Alamo, D., de Pablos-Velasco, P., . . . Calbet, J. A. L. (2019). Protein synthesis signaling in skeletal muscle is refractory to whey protein ingestion during a severe energy deficit evoked by prolonged exercise and caloric restriction. International Journal of Obesity, 43(4), 872-882
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Protein synthesis signaling in skeletal muscle is refractory to whey protein ingestion during a severe energy deficit evoked by prolonged exercise and caloric restriction
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2019 (English)In: International Journal of Obesity, ISSN 0307-0565, E-ISSN 1476-5497, Vol. 43, no 4, p. 872-882Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Exercise and protein ingestion preserve muscle mass during moderate energy deficits. Objective: To determine the molecular mechanisms by which exercise and protein ingestion may spare muscle mass during severe energy deficit (5500 kcal/day).

Design: Fifteen overweight, but otherwise healthy men, underwent a pre-test (PRE), caloric restriction (3.2 kcals/kg body weight/day) + exercise (45 min one-arm cranking + 8 h walking) for 4 days (CRE), followed by a control diet (CD) for 3 days, with a caloric content similar to pre-intervention while exercise was reduced to less than 10,000 steps per day. During CRE, participants ingested either whey protein (PRO, n = 8) or sucrose (SU, n = 7) (0.8 g/kg body weight/day). Muscle biopsies were obtained from the trained and untrained deltoid, and vastus lateralis.

Results: Following CRE and CD, serum concentrations of leptin, insulin, and testosterone were reduced, whereas cortisol and the catabolic index (cortisol/total testosterone) increased. The Akt/mTor/p70S6K pathway and total eIF2α were unchanged, while total 4E-BP1 and Thr37/464E-BP1 were higher. After CRE, plasma BCAA and EAA were elevated, with a greater response in PRO group, and total GSK3β, pSer9GSK3β, pSer51eIF2α, and pSer51eIF2α/total eIF2α were reduced, with a greater response of pSer9GSK3β in the PRO group. The changes in signaling were associated with the changes in leptin, insulin, amino acids, cortisol, cortisol/total testosterone, and lean mass.

Conclusions: During severe energy deficit, pSer9GSK3β levels are reduced and human skeletal muscle becomes refractory to the anabolic effects of whey protein ingestion, regardless of contractile activity. These effects are associated with the changes in lean mass and serum insulin, testosterone, and cortisol concentrations. 

National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-35045 (URN)10.1038/s41366-018-0174-2 (DOI)000462994400025 ()30242237 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85053695498 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-12-04 Created: 2018-12-04 Last updated: 2019-05-22Bibliographically approved
Supej, M. & Holmberg, H.-C. (2019). Recent Kinematic and Kinetic Advances in Olympic Alpine Skiing: Pyeongchang and Beyond. Frontiers in Physiology, 10(FEB), Article ID 111.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Recent Kinematic and Kinetic Advances in Olympic Alpine Skiing: Pyeongchang and Beyond
2019 (English)In: Frontiers in Physiology, ISSN 1664-042X, E-ISSN 1664-042X, Vol. 10, no FEB, article id 111Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Alpine skiing has been an Olympic event since the first Winter Games in 1936. Nowadays, skiers compete in four main events: slalom, giant slalom, super-G and downhill. Here, we present an update on the biomechanics of alpine ski racers and their equipment. The technical and tactical ability of today's world-class skiers have adapted substantially to changes in equipment, snow conditions and courses. The wide variety of terrain, slopes, gate setups and snow conditions involved in alpine skiing requires skiers to continuously adapt, alternating between the carving and skidding turning techniques. The technical complexity places a premium on minimizing energy dissipation, employing strategies and ski equipment that minimize ski-snow friction and aerodynamic drag. Access to multiple split times along the racing course, in combination with analysis of the trajectory and speed provide information that can be utilized to enhance performance. Peak ground reaction forces, which can be as high as five times body weight, serve as a measure of the external load on the skier and equipment. Although the biomechanics of alpine skiing have significantly improved, several questions concerning optimization of skiers' performance remain to be investigated. Recent advances in sensor technology that allow kinematics and kinetics to be monitored can provide detailed information about the biomechanical factors related to success in competitions. Moreover, collection of data during training and actual competitions will enhance the quality of guidelines for training future Olympic champions. At the same time, the need to individualize training and skiing equipment for each unique skier will motivate innovative scientific research for years to come.

Keywords
downhill, giant slalom, performance, super-G, tactics, technique
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-35803 (URN)10.3389/fphys.2019.00111 (DOI)000459161800001 ()30842740 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85065901187 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-03-18 Created: 2019-03-18 Last updated: 2020-02-18Bibliographically approved
Supej, M., Nedergaard, N., Nord, J. & Holmberg, H.-C. (2019). The impact of start strategy on start performance in alpine skiing exists on flat, but not on steep inclines. Journal of Sports Sciences, 37(6), 647-655
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The impact of start strategy on start performance in alpine skiing exists on flat, but not on steep inclines
2019 (English)In: Journal of Sports Sciences, ISSN 0264-0414, E-ISSN 1466-447X, Vol. 37, no 6, p. 647-655Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Here, we explored the relationship between incline and start strategy during alpine skiing. Eight FIS skiers performed starts on a flat (3°) and steep (21°) incline employing five different strategies. Their times, trajectories and velocities were monitored with a GNSS system and video. A significant interaction was observed between slope incline and start strategy with respect to the skier’s exit velocity (p < 0.001, ƞ2 p = 0.716), but not for the start section time (p = 0.732, ƞ2 p = 0.037). On the almost flat incline, both section time (p = 0.022, ƞ2 p = 0.438) and exit velocity (p < 0.001, ƞ2 p = 0.786) were influenced significantly by start strategy, with four V2 skate-pushes being optimal. On the steep incline, neither section time nor exit velocity was affected significantly by start strategy, the fastest section time and exit velocity being attained with four and two V2 skate-pushes, respectively. In conclusion, these findings demonstrate that the start strategy exerts considerable impact on start performance on almost flat inclines, with strategies involving three or more V2 skate-pushes being optimal. In contrast, start performance on the steep incline was not influenced by strategy.

Keywords
Biomechanics, coach evaluation, kinematic, pole-push, skate stroke
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-35079 (URN)10.1080/02640414.2018.1522698 (DOI)000456817600006 ()30317917 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-12-17 Created: 2018-12-17 Last updated: 2020-02-18Bibliographically approved
Sperlich, B., Hahn, L.-S., Edel, A., Behr, T., Helmprobst, J., Leppich, R., . . . Holmberg, H.-C. (2018). A 4-Week Intervention Involving Mobile-Based Daily 6-Minute Micro-Sessions of Functional High-Intensity Circuit Training Improves Strength and Quality of Life, but Not Cardio-Respiratory Fitness of Young Untrained Adults. Frontiers in Physiology, 9, Article ID e423.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A 4-Week Intervention Involving Mobile-Based Daily 6-Minute Micro-Sessions of Functional High-Intensity Circuit Training Improves Strength and Quality of Life, but Not Cardio-Respiratory Fitness of Young Untrained Adults
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2018 (English)In: Frontiers in Physiology, ISSN 1664-042X, E-ISSN 1664-042X, Vol. 9, article id e423Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The present study was designed to assess the psycho-physiological responses of physically untrained individuals to mobile-based multi-stimulating, circuit-like, multiplejoint conditioning (CircuitHiu) performed either once (IxCircuitmu) or twice (2xCircuitHiu) daily for 4 weeks. In this single-center, two-arm randomized, controlled study, 24 men and women (age: 25 +/- 5 years) first received no training instructions for 4 weeks and then performed 4 weeks of either IxCircuitnirr or 2xCircuitHiu (5 men and 7 women in each group) daily. The IxCircuitnirr and 2xCircuitHiu participants carried out 90.7 and 85.7% of all planned training sessions, respectively, with average heart rates during the 6-min sessions of 74.3 and 70.8% of maximal heart rate. Body, fat and fat-free mass, and metabolic rate at rest did not differ between the groups or between time-points of measurement. Heart rate while running at 6 km h(-1) declined after the intervention in both groups. Submaximal and peak oxygen uptake, the respiratory exchange ratio and heart rate recovery were not altered by either intervention. The maximal numbers of push-ups, leg-levers, burpees, 45 degrees-one-legged squats and 30-s skipping, as well as perception of general health improved in both groups. Our IxCircuitHiu or 2xCircuitHiiT interventions improved certain parameters of functional strength and certain dimensions of quality of life in young untrained individuals. However, they were not sufficient to enhance cardio-respiratory fitness, in particular peak oxygen uptake.

Keywords
aerobic fitness, body composition, functional training, mHealth, power training, V800, wearable, Web-based apps
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-33677 (URN)10.3389/fphys.2018.00423 (DOI)000431783900001 ()2-s2.0-85046654801 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-05-30 Created: 2018-05-30 Last updated: 2018-06-10Bibliographically approved
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ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-3814-6246

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