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Bäckström, Britt
Publications (10 of 19) Show all publications
Häggström, M., Bäckström, B., Vestling, I., Hallin, K., Segevall, C. & Kristiansen, L. (2017). Overcoming reluctance towards High Fidelity Simulation: a mutual challenge for nursing students’ and faculty teachers. Global Journal of Health Science, 9(7), 127-137, Article ID 1916-9744.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Overcoming reluctance towards High Fidelity Simulation: a mutual challenge for nursing students’ and faculty teachers
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2017 (English)In: Global Journal of Health Science, ISSN 1916-9736, E-ISSN 1916-9744, Vol. 9, no 7, p. 127-137, article id 1916-9744Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: One strategy to develop nursing students’ clinical judgment are the use of high-fidelity patient simulation (HFS). The aim of the study was twofold. Firstly, the aim of this study was to describe the nursing students’ experiences while participating in HFS, and secondly to describe faculty teachers’ reflections about nursing students’ need in HFS and the related teaching challenges.

METHODData was collected in focus group discussions and individual interviews, analyzed using thematic qualitative content analysis.

FINDINGSThe nursing students’ experienced HFS as being thrown into an uncertain, exposure situation. This were for some, reason for reluctance. The teachers challenge was motivating and coaching the students throughout a demanding teaching situation.

DISCUSSION: Students’ ability to perform in HFS is influenced by self-perceived efficacy, own attitudes and responsibility for one’s learning, which are a challenge for the teachers.

CONCLUSION: HFS methodology can be useful to identify gaps and strengths in students’ professional transition towards becoming registered nurses. Overcoming reluctance towards HFS is a mutual challenge for faculty teachers and nursing students. By entering the scenario with a positive mindset, nursing students can improve their ability to perform clinical judgments.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Canada center of Science And education, 2017
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-32516 (URN)10.5539/gjhs.v9n7p127 (DOI)
Available from: 2017-12-19 Created: 2017-12-19 Last updated: 2017-12-21Bibliographically approved
Östlund, U., Bäckström, B., Saveman, B.-I. -., Lindh, V. & Sundin, K. (2016). A Family Systems Nursing Approach for Families Following a Stroke: Family Health Conversations. Journal of Family Nursing, 22(2), 148-171
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A Family Systems Nursing Approach for Families Following a Stroke: Family Health Conversations
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2016 (English)In: Journal of Family Nursing, Vol. 22, no 2, p. 148-171Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Stroke in midlife is a life altering, challenging experience for the whole family thereby necessitating a family approach to intervention. The aim of this study was to describe the experiences of 17 family members living in Sweden, including seven adult stroke patients (six males; one female) under the age of 65 who participated in a series of three nurse-led family conversations that were offered in each family's home. These Family Health Conversations (FamHC) were guided by the conceptual lens of Family System Nursing. Individual, semi-structured, evaluative interviews conducted with each participant one month after the FamHC were analyzed by qualitative content analysis. The FamHC were described by family members as a unique conversation that they had not previously experienced in health care contexts. Family members described possibilities for relational sharing and meaningful conversations as well as changes in family functioning that support the suitability of FamHC for family stroke care.

Keywords
Family Health Conversations, family intervention, family nursing, Family Systems Nursing, stroke, Sweden, therapeutic conversation
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-27846 (URN)10.1177/1074840716642790 (DOI)000376209900002 ()2-s2.0-84966593385 (Scopus ID)
Note

Article

Available from: 2016-06-09 Created: 2016-06-09 Last updated: 2016-07-21Bibliographically approved
Hallin, K., Häggström, M., Bäckström, B. & Kristiansen, L. (2016). Correlations between Clinical Judgement and Learning Style Preferences of Nursing Students in the Simulation Room. Global Journal of Health Science, 8(6)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Correlations between Clinical Judgement and Learning Style Preferences of Nursing Students in the Simulation Room
2016 (English)In: Global Journal of Health Science, ISSN 1916-9736, E-ISSN 1916-9744, Vol. 8, no 6Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Health care educators account for variables affecting patient safety and are responsible for developing the highly complex process of education planning. Clinical judgement is a multidimensional process, which may be affected by learning styles. The aim was to explore three specific hypotheses to test correlations between nursing students’ team achievements in clinical judgement and emotional, sociological and physiological learning style preferences.

METHODS: A descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted with Swedish university nursing students in 2012-2013. Convenience sampling was used with 60 teams with 173 nursing students in the final semester of a three-year Bachelor of Science in nursing programme. Data collection included questionnaires of personal characteristics, learning style preferences, determined by the Dunn and Dunn Productivity Environmental Preference Survey, and videotaped complex nursing simulation scenarios. Comparison with Lasater Clinical Judgement Rubric and Non-parametric analyses were performed.

RESULTS: Three significant correlations were found between the team achievements and the students’ learning style preferences: significant negative correlation with ‘Structure’ and ‘Kinesthetic’ at the individual level, and positive correlation with the ‘Tactile’ variable. No significant correlations with students’ ‘Motivation’, ‘Persistence’, ‘Wish to learn alone’ and ‘Wish for an authoritative person present’ were seen.

DISCUSSION & CONCLUSION: There were multiple complex interactions between the tested learning style preferences and the team achievements of clinical judgement in the simulation room, which provides important information for the becoming nurses. Several factors may have influenced the results that should be acknowledged when designing further research. We suggest conducting mixed methods to determine further relationships between team achievements, learning style preferences, cognitive learning outcomes and group processes.

National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-23372 (URN)10.5539/gjhs.v8n6p1 (DOI)
Available from: 2014-11-06 Created: 2014-11-06 Last updated: 2017-06-22Bibliographically approved
Dorell, Å., Bäckström, B., Ericsson, M., Johansson, M., Östlund, U. & Sundin, K. (2016). Experiences With Family Health Conversations at Residential Homes for Older People. Clinical Nursing Research, 25(5), 560-582
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Experiences With Family Health Conversations at Residential Homes for Older People
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2016 (English)In: Clinical Nursing Research, ISSN 1054-7738, E-ISSN 1552-3799, Vol. 25, no 5, p. 560-582Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of this study was to highlight family members’ experiences of participating in Family Health Conversation (FamHC), based on families in which a family member was living in a residential home for older people. A total of 10 families and 22 family members participated in evaluating family interviews 1 month after participating in FamHC. The interviews were analyzed by qualitative content analysis. The main finding was being a part of FamHC increased family members’ insights, understanding, and communication within the family. Getting confirmation from nurses was essential to cope with the new life situation, which also meant that they felt comfortable to partly hand over the responsibility for the older person who moved to the residential home. By being open and expressing their feelings, a bad conscience could be relieved. These findings showed that FamHC could be helpful for family members in adapting to this novel situation.

Keywords
family health conversations, family nursing intervention, family support, family systems nursing, residential home for older people
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-28913 (URN)10.1177/1054773814565174 (DOI)000383385500007 ()25550306 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84987732840 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-09-26 Created: 2016-09-26 Last updated: 2017-11-21Bibliographically approved
Hallin, K., Bäckström, B., Häggström, M. & Kristiansen, L. (2016). High-fidelity simulation: Assessment of student nurses' team achievements of clinical judgment. Nurse Education in Practice, 19, 12-18
Open this publication in new window or tab >>High-fidelity simulation: Assessment of student nurses' team achievements of clinical judgment
2016 (English)In: Nurse Education in Practice, Vol. 19, p. 12-18Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Nursing educators have the challenge of preparing nursing students to handle complex patient care situations in real life, but much remains unknown about the ability to make clinical judgments. In this study, high-fidelity simulation (HFS) was used at a Swedish university to find answers about pre-licensure nursing students' success in clinical judgment in terms of team ability and relationships with theoretical achievements, and personal and scenario circumstances. The matrix Lasater Clinical Judgment Rubric (LCJR) was used to analyze and score the students' ability in teams to notice, interpret and respond to complex care situations. Overall, the results showed the student teams in their first meeting with HFS in a complex care situation achieved low clinical judgment points; most teams were in the stages of Beginning and Developing. For attaining high team achievements the majority of the students in the team should theoretically be "high performance". Being observers and having HFS experience before nursing education was significant too. However, age, health care experience, and assistant nurse degrees were of secondary importance. Further research at universities regionally, nationally, and internationally is needed.

Keywords
Clinical skills, HFS, Nursing education, Simulation-based performance, Videotaped scenarios
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-27838 (URN)10.1016/j.nepr.2016.03.010 (DOI)000381650700003 ()27428686 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84962868639 (Scopus ID)
External cooperation:
Note

Article

Available from: 2016-06-09 Created: 2016-06-09 Last updated: 2016-09-12Bibliographically approved
Sundin, K., Bäckström, B., Lindh, V., Lindkvist, M., Saveman, B.-I. & Östlund, U. (2016). Responses after participating in Family Health Conversations in families with a family member who has suffered a stroke: A mixed methods research study. Clinical Nursing Studies, 4(4), 46-57
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Responses after participating in Family Health Conversations in families with a family member who has suffered a stroke: A mixed methods research study
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2016 (English)In: Clinical Nursing Studies, ISSN 2324-7940, E-ISSN 2324-7959, Vol. 4, no 4, p. 46-57Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background:It has been proposed that support for families in which a family member has suffered a stroke should involve the whole family system. Aim:The aim was to evaluate the responses of Family Health Conversation (FamHC) in families with a member under the age of 65 who has been diagnosed with stroke. Methods:In this mixed methods research study, families were included in an intervention group and in a control group. For both groups pre- and post-intervention quantitative data was collected and for the intervention group, qualitative data was collected post-intervention. Underlying theoretical propositions and the two data sets were then integrated. Results: Family health measured as “the general atmosphere of the interaction of the family” had improved in the intervention group when compared to the control group. The intervention families, moreover, described how they had become more cooperative, their communication had improved, they had become more confident with their situation and also when planning for the future when comparing to before the FamHC. Conclusions: Based on the empirical results supporting the theoretical proposition underlying FamHC, we conclude that it works as intended, and the evidence for the theoretical proposition is thereby strengthened. This paper contributes to the scientific evidence concerning FamHC. With the available evidence, RNs are suggested to consider changing practice so as to work in amore family-centred way to support families living with ill-health. Implementing FamHC can be one way of undertaking such supportive work.

National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-29727 (URN)10.5430/cns.v4n4p46 (DOI)
Available from: 2016-12-21 Created: 2016-12-21 Last updated: 2017-11-29
Östlund, U., Bäckström, B., Lindh, V., Sundin, K. & Saveman, B.-I. .. (2015). Nurses' fidelity to theory-based core components when implementing Family Health Conversations - a qualitative inquiry. Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, 29(3), 582-590
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Nurses' fidelity to theory-based core components when implementing Family Health Conversations - a qualitative inquiry
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2015 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 29, no 3, p. 582-590Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background and aim: A family systems nursing intervention, Family Health Conversation, has been developed in Sweden by adapting the Calgary Family Assessment and Intervention Models and the Illness Beliefs Model. The intervention has several theoretical assumptions, and one way translate the theory into practice is to identify core components. This may produce higher levels of fidelity to the intervention. Besides information about how to implement an intervention in accordance to how it was developed, evaluating whether it was actually implemented as intended is important. Accordingly, we describe the nurses' fidelity to the identified core components of Family Health Conversation. Intervention and research methods: Six nurses, working in alternating pairs, conducted Family Health Conversations with seven families in which a family member younger than 65 had suffered a stroke. The intervention contained a series of three-1-hour conversations held at 2-3 week intervals. The nurses followed a conversation structure based on 12 core components identified from theoretical assumptions. The transcripts of the 21 conversations were analysed using manifest qualitative content analysis with a deductive approach. Results and conclusion: The 'core components' seemed to be useful even if nurses' fidelity varied among the core components. Some components were followed relatively well, but others were not. This indicates that the process for achieving fidelity to the intervention can be improved, and that it is necessary for nurses to continually learn theory and to practise family systems nursing. We suggest this can be accomplished through reflections, role play and training on the core components. Furthermore, as in this study, joint reflections on how the core components have been implemented can lead to deeper understanding and knowledge of how Family Health Conversation can be delivered as intended. © 2015 Nordic College of Caring Science.

Keywords
Family, Family Health Conversation, Family systems nursing, Fidelity, Intervention, Stroke
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-25913 (URN)10.1111/scs.12178 (DOI)000359867700022 ()2-s2.0-84939421656 (Scopus ID)
Note

CODEN: SJSCE

Available from: 2015-09-23 Created: 2015-09-23 Last updated: 2017-12-01Bibliographically approved
Kristiansen, L., Häggström, M., Hallin, K., Andersson, I. & Bäckström, B. (2015). Svensk översättning, kvalitativ relevansvärdering och kvantitativ reliabilitetstestning av Lasater Clinical Judgment Rubric: Swedish translation, qualitative relevance evaluation and quantitative reliability test of Lasater Clinical Judgment Rubric . Nordic journal of nursing research, 35(2), 113-122
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Svensk översättning, kvalitativ relevansvärdering och kvantitativ reliabilitetstestning av Lasater Clinical Judgment Rubric: Swedish translation, qualitative relevance evaluation and quantitative reliability test of Lasater Clinical Judgment Rubric 
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2015 (Swedish)In: Nordic journal of nursing research, ISSN 2057-1585, E-ISSN 2057-1593, Vol. 35, no 2, p. 113-122Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Newly graduated nurses show lacking skills and competences regarding the ability to make appropriate clinical assessment of acute, complex care situations. There is also a lack of translated, qualitative relevance evaluated and reliability tested rubrics in the Swedish language. The purpose of this method article was to translate, conduct a relevance evaluation and reliability test of the identified Lasater Clinical Judgment Rubric (LCJR). In this article the Swedish translation LCJR (S) is presented. The results showed that the LCJR (S) was both  qualitatively relevant and quantitatively reliable. We claim that there are several advantages to systematic use LCJR (S) for assessment of nursing students' clinical judgment in laboratory simulation environments with acute patient situations

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Sage Publications, 2015
Keywords
Clinical judgement, Lasater Clinical Judgment Rubric, nursing Students, qualitative relevance evaluation, reliability test, Swedish translation
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-26372 (URN)10.1177/0107408315578397 (DOI)
Funder
Magnus Bergvall Foundation
Available from: 2015-12-07 Created: 2015-12-07 Last updated: 2017-12-01Bibliographically approved
Häggström, M. & Bäckström, B. (2014). Organizing Safe Transitions from Intensive Care. Nursing Research and Practice (Article ID 175314)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Organizing Safe Transitions from Intensive Care
2014 (English)In: Nursing Research and Practice, ISSN 2090-1429, E-ISSN 2090-1437, no Article ID 175314Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background. Organizing and performing patient transfers in the continuum of care is part of the work of nurses and other staff of a multiprofessional healthcare team. An understanding of discharge practices is needed in order to ultimate patients’ transfers from high technological intensive care units (ICU) to general wards. Aim. To describe, as experienced by intensive care and general ward staff, what strategies could be used when organizing patient’s care before, during, and after transfer from intensive care. Method. Interviews of 15 participants were conducted, audio-taped, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed using qualitative content analysis. Results. The results showed that the categories secure, encourage, and collaborate are strategies used in the three phases of the ICU transitional care process. The main category; a safe, interactive rehabilitation process, illustrated how all strategies were characterized by an intention to create and maintain safety during the process. A three-way interaction was described: between staff and patient/families, between team members and involved units, and between patient/family and environment. Discussion/Conclusions. The findings highlight that ICU transitional care implies critical care rehabilitation. Discharge procedures need to be safe and structured and involve collaboration, encouraging support, optimal timing, early mobilization, and a multidiscipline approach.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Hindawi Publishing Corporation, 2014
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-22822 (URN)10.1155/2014/175314 (DOI)
Available from: 2014-09-08 Created: 2014-09-08 Last updated: 2017-12-05
Bäckström, B. (2012). Att vara i medelåldern när en familjemedlem insjuknar i stroke (1:1ed.). In: Eva Benzein, Margaretha Hagberg, Britt-Inger Saveman (Ed.), Att möta familjer inom vård och omsorg (pp. 179-189). Lund: Studentlitteratur
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Att vara i medelåldern när en familjemedlem insjuknar i stroke
2012 (Swedish)In: Att möta familjer inom vård och omsorg / [ed] Eva Benzein, Margaretha Hagberg, Britt-Inger Saveman, Lund: Studentlitteratur, 2012, 1:1, p. 179-189Chapter in book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lund: Studentlitteratur, 2012 Edition: 1:1
Keywords
familj, systemteori, hälsostödjande samtal
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-17610 (URN)978-91-44-07266-1 (ISBN)
Available from: 2012-12-07 Created: 2012-12-07 Last updated: 2012-12-07Bibliographically approved
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