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Wasteson, Elisabet
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Publications (10 of 14) Show all publications
Vikstrom, N. H., Wasteson, E., Lindam, A. & Samuelsson, E. (2020). Anxiety and depression in women with urinary incontinence using E-health. International Urogynecology Journal
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Anxiety and depression in women with urinary incontinence using E-health
2020 (English)In: International Urogynecology Journal, ISSN 0937-3462, E-ISSN 1433-3023Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Introduction and hypothesis Previous studies have found high prevalence rates of anxiety and depression in women with urinary incontinence (UI). This study investigates the prevalence in women who had turned to eHealth for treatment of UI and identifies possible factors associated with depression. Methods We analyzed data from two randomized controlled trials evaluating eHealth treatment for UI, including 373 women with stress UI (SUI), urgency UI (UUI), or mixed UI (MUI). We used the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and defined a score of >= 8 as depression or anxiety. The ICIQ-UI-SF questionnaire was used to score incontinence severity. Logistic regression was used to determine factors associated with depression and anxiety. Results Women with UUI or MUI were older than women with SUI, mean age 58.3 vs 48.6 years (p = <0.001). Four out of five participating women had a university education. The prevalence of anxiety and depression in women with SUI was 12.4% and 3.2% respectively. In women with MUI/UUI, 13.8% had anxiety and 10.6% had depression. In multivariate analyses, the odds ratio of having depression was 4.2 (95% CI = 1.4-12.3) for women with MUI/UUI compared with SUI when controlling for other risk factors. Conclusion The odds of depression in women with MUI/UUI were increased compared with SUI. The prevalence of anxiety and depression was considerably lower than reported in large cross-sectional surveys. Socioeconomic differences may partly explain this finding, as the use of eHealth still is more common among highly educated women.

National Category
Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-38684 (URN)10.1007/s00192-020-04227-2 (DOI)000516510800001 ()32095954 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2020-03-19 Created: 2020-03-19 Last updated: 2020-03-19
Sarkadi, A., Warner, G., Salari, R., Fängström, K., Durbeej, N., Lampa, E., . . . Keeshin, B. (2020). Evaluation of the Teaching Recovery Techniques community-based intervention for unaccompanied refugee youth experiencing post-traumatic stress symptoms (Swedish UnaccomPanied yOuth Refugee Trial; SUPpORT): study protocol for a randomised controlled trial. Trials, 21(1), Article ID 63.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Evaluation of the Teaching Recovery Techniques community-based intervention for unaccompanied refugee youth experiencing post-traumatic stress symptoms (Swedish UnaccomPanied yOuth Refugee Trial; SUPpORT): study protocol for a randomised controlled trial
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2020 (English)In: Trials, ISSN 1745-6215, E-ISSN 1745-6215, Vol. 21, no 1, article id 63Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: In 2015, 162,877 persons sought asylum in Sweden, 35,369 of whom were unaccompanied refugee minors (URMs). Refugee children, especially URMs, have often experienced traumas and are at significant risk of developing mental health problems, such as symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), depression and anxiety, which can continue years after resettlement. The Swedish UnaccomPanied yOuth Refugee Trial (SUPpORT) aims to evaluate a community-based intervention, called Teaching Recovery Techniques (TRT), for refugee youth experiencing PTSD symptoms.

METHODS/DESIGN: A randomised controlled trial will be conducted in which participants will be randomly allocated to one of two possible arms: the intervention arm (n = 109) will be offered the TRT programme, and the waitlist-control arm (n = 109) will receive services as usual, followed by the TRT programme around 20 weeks later. Outcome data will be collected at three points: pre-intervention (T1), post-intervention (T2; about 8 weeks after randomisation) and follow-up (T3; about 20 weeks after randomisation).

DISCUSSION: This study will provide knowledge about the effect and efficiency of a group intervention for URMs reporting symptoms of PTSD in Sweden. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ISRCTN, ISRCTN47820795. Prospectively registered on 20 December 2018.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
NLM (Medline), 2020
Keywords
Post-traumatic stress disorder, Randomised controlled trial, Teaching Recovery Techniques, Unaccompanied refugee minors
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-38249 (URN)10.1186/s13063-019-3814-5 (DOI)000513721900001 ()31924247 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85077765010 (Scopus ID)
Note

This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ 

Available from: 2020-01-20 Created: 2020-01-20 Last updated: 2020-03-16Bibliographically approved
Leiler, A., Bjärtå, A., Ekdahl, J. & Wasteson, E. (2019). Mental Health and Quality of Life among Asylum Seekers and Refugees Living in Refugee Housing Facilities in Sweden. Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology, 54(5), 543-551
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mental Health and Quality of Life among Asylum Seekers and Refugees Living in Refugee Housing Facilities in Sweden
2019 (English)In: Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology, ISSN 0933-7954, E-ISSN 1433-9285, Vol. 54, no 5, p. 543-551Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In 2015, there was a high influx of refugees to Sweden, creating an extreme situation where individuals were forced to remain in large housing facilities for long periods. The present study aims to describe the mental health and quality of life of these individuals. 

Methods. Data, based on 510 individuals, were obtained by means of a questionnaire at open screenings conducted at or nearby refugee housing facilities. Of the participating refugees, 367 were asylum seekers and 143 had received a residence permit but were still awaiting a more permanent housing solution. The questionnaire included measures of depressive symptoms (PHQ-9), symptoms of anxiety (GAD-7), risk of having post traumatic stress disorder (PC-PTSD), and quality of life (WHOQOL-BREF).

Results. Of the total sample, 56-58.4% reported clinically significant levels of symptoms of depression, anxiety and risk of having PTSD. Prevalence estimates were higher among asylum seekers than among those who had received their residence permit. Quality of life was generally rated below population norms and correlated negatively with mental health outcomes.

Conclusions. Individuals residing in refugee housing facilities show high levels of psychological distress and rate their quality of life as low. Asylum seekers score higher than those having received a residence permit. These results are troublesome since the wait time for asylum decisions has lengthened considerably after 2015. The results of the present study calls for the urgency of societal actions to shorten the asylum process wait time and improve conditions at the housing facilities.  

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2019
Keywords
Refugee mental health, Prevalence, Aylum seekers
National Category
Applied Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-35290 (URN)10.1007/s00127-018-1651-6 (DOI)000468889500003 ()30580381 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85059004802 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-12-19 Created: 2018-12-19 Last updated: 2019-07-08
Leiler, A., Hollifield, M., Wasteson, E. & Bjärtå, A. (2019). Suicidal ideation and severity of distress among refugees residing in asylum accommodations in Sweden. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 16(15), Article ID 2751.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Suicidal ideation and severity of distress among refugees residing in asylum accommodations in Sweden
2019 (English)In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 16, no 15, article id 2751Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Refugees worldwide suffer high levels of distress and are at increased risk for death by suicide. The Refugee Health Screener (RHS) was developed to screen for emotional distress among refugees and can be used to assess distress severity. This paper examines the association between distress severity and suicidal ideation in a sample of refugees residing in asylum accommodations. Data from the RHS and item 9 on the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9) was analyzed. Results showed that individuals at moderate and severe levels of distress were much more likely to exhibit suicidal ideation than individuals with low levels of distress. Even though we cannot conclude that individuals with low levels of distress do not have thoughts of ending their lives, further suicide assessment is warranted in asylum seekers with moderate to severe distress on the RHS. 

Keywords
Refugees, Severity of distress, Suicidal ideation
National Category
Applied Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-37013 (URN)10.3390/ijerph16152751 (DOI)000482128400120 ()31374949 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85070980526 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-09-02 Created: 2019-09-02 Last updated: 2019-09-23Bibliographically approved
Bjärtå, A., Leiler, A., Ekdahl, J. & Wasteson, E. (2018). Assessing Severity of Psychological Distress Among Refugees With the Refugee Health Screener, 13-Item Version. Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease, 206(11), 834-839
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Assessing Severity of Psychological Distress Among Refugees With the Refugee Health Screener, 13-Item Version
2018 (English)In: Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease, ISSN 0022-3018, E-ISSN 1539-736X, Vol. 206, no 11, p. 834-839Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The recent inflow of refugees to Sweden has put pressure on health care as well as revealing a need for methods regarding assessment of refugees' mental health status. The present study investigated the use of the Refugee Health Screener (RHS; Hollifield et al., 2013) to distinguish among severity levels of symptoms of psychological distress in refugees. Refugees residing in asylum accommodations (n = 510) were screened with RHS-13, together with screeners for depression, anxiety, and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Risk for mild, moderate, or severe levels of depression, anxiety, or/and PTSD was used as screening proxy. Receiver operating characteristic analysis rendered cutoff scores of 11, 18, and 25, for mild, moderate, and severe symptoms, respectively. Evaluated against each symptom scale separately, cutoffs performed well. Cutoff 11, previously identified by Hollifield et al. (2016), was also confirmed. However, utilization of additional cutoffs could improve refugee mental health by guiding clinical decision making.

Keywords
Refugee mental health, screening instrument, symptom severity levels
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-35042 (URN)10.1097/NMD.0000000000000886 (DOI)000449644500002 ()30256332 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85055612622 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-12-04 Created: 2018-12-04 Last updated: 2019-08-06Bibliographically approved
Leiler, A., Bjärtå, A., Ekdahl, J. & Wasteson, E. (2018). High levels of psychological distress among asylum seekers and refugees in Sweden. In: : . Paper presented at association of psychological Science, APS.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>High levels of psychological distress among asylum seekers and refugees in Sweden
2018 (Swedish)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

In 2015 there was an unforeseen increase of refugees worldwide. In order to face the high rates of psychological distress refugees suffer, the AMIR-project created a model for early assessment and intervention of mental health among refugees. Previous research might not be applicable to the groups seeking asylum in Europe from 2015, so as a first step, a study aiming to estimate the prevalence of mental health problems was conducted.  

Methods. Five hundred and ten refugees participated at open screenings conducted at refugee housing facilities. Of the participants, 367 were asylum seekers and 143 had received a residence permit. Instruments included measures of depressive symptoms, anxiety, risk of having PTSD and quality of life.

Preliminary results. A high percentage of individuals (56-58.4%) reported clinically significant levels of depression, anxiety and risk of having PTSD. Prevalence estimates were significantly higher among asylum seekers than among those who had received their residence permit. Quality of life was generally rated below population norms and correlated significantly with mental health outcomes.

Conclusions. Individuals residing in refugee housing facilities show high levels of psychological distress. Asylum seekers are worse off than those having received a residence permit. Actions should be taken to improve conditions in housing facilities, to shorten the time awaiting the asylum decision and to provide psychosocial support to help individuals manage their distress during the time of waiting.

Key words: Refugee – asylum seeker – mental health – quality of life - prevalence

National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-35121 (URN)
Conference
association of psychological Science, APS
Available from: 2018-12-10 Created: 2018-12-10 Last updated: 2018-12-10Bibliographically approved
Bring, A., Bring, J., Söderlund, A., Wasteson, E. & Åsenlöf, P. (2013). Coping Patterns and Their Relation to Daily Activity, Worries, Depressed Mood, and Pain Intensity in Acute Whiplash-Associated Disorders. International Journal of Behavioral Medicine, 20(2), 293-303
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Coping Patterns and Their Relation to Daily Activity, Worries, Depressed Mood, and Pain Intensity in Acute Whiplash-Associated Disorders
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2013 (English)In: International Journal of Behavioral Medicine, ISSN 1070-5503, E-ISSN 1532-7558, Vol. 20, no 2, p. 293-303Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

There is a lack of knowledge regarding how individuals with acute whiplash-associated disorders (WAD) appraise and cope with situation-specific stressors. The aim of the study was to describe the daily process of coping reported in a daily coping assessment by individuals with acute WAD within 1 month after the accident. More specifically, profiles of coping strategies were identified and patterns between stressors, primary and secondary appraisals, and coping strategy profiles were described in relation to reported level of activity, worries, depressed mood and pain intensity during the day. A descriptive and exploratory design was applied. Two hundred and twenty-nine whiplash-associated disorders-daily coping assessment (WAD-DCA) collected during seven consecutive days from 51 participants with acute WAD in Sweden, were included. Cluster analysis was used to obtain coping strategy profiles and data were graphically visualised as patterns through the coping process. When measuring coping as a daily process relating to the specific stressful situation, different coping process patterns appeared. During days with a high degree of physical and mental well-being, high self-efficacy beliefs seemed to be working as an important secondary appraisal, whereas during days with a low degree of physical and mental well-being primary appraisals of the stressor as a threat and catastrophic thoughts were present in the coping process. Early identification of situational- and individual-specific stressors, appraisals and coping efforts as measured by the WAD-DCA may contribute to the understanding of the coping process in the acute stage of WAD and its possible impact on recovery and adjustment.

Keywords
Coping, Daily assessments, Whiplash-associated disorders, Physical well-being, Emotional well-being
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-19354 (URN)10.1007/s12529-012-9220-y (DOI)000318505900017 ()2-s2.0-84877920550 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2013-09-10 Created: 2013-06-19 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
Brenne, E., Loge, J. H., Kaasa, S., Heitzer, E., Knudsen, A. K. & Wasteson, E. (2013). Depressed patients with incurable cancer: which depressive symptoms do they experience?. Palliative & Supportive Care, 11(6), 491-501
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Depressed patients with incurable cancer: which depressive symptoms do they experience?
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2013 (English)In: Palliative & Supportive Care, ISSN 1478-9515, E-ISSN 1478-9523, Vol. 11, no 6, p. 491-501Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVE: Diagnosing depressive disorders in palliative care is challenging because of the overlap between some depressive symptoms and cancer-related symptoms, such as loss of appetite and fatigue. In order to improve future assessment of depression in palliative care, depressive symptoms experienced by patients receiving pharmacological treatment for depression were assessed and compared to the American Psychiatric Association, Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th ed. (DSM-IV) criteria for major depressive disorder.

METHOD: Thirty Norwegian (n = 20) and Austrian (n = 10) patients with advanced cancer were included. Semistructured interviews on symptom experiences were conducted and transcribed verbatim. By the phenomenographic method, patients' symptom experiences were extracted and sorted by headings, first individually and then across patients. The patients subsequently rated 24 symptoms numerically including the DSM-IV depression criteria.

RESULTS: Lowered mood and a diminished motivational drive were prominent and reflected the two main DSM-IV symptom criteria. A relentless focus on their actual situation, restlessness, disrupted sleep, feelings of worthlessness, feelings of guilt, and thoughts of death as a solution were variably experienced. Appetite and weight changes, fatigue and psychomotor retardation were indistinguishable from cancer symptoms. All these symptoms reflected DSM-IV symptom criteria. Some major symptoms occurred that are not present in the DSM-IV symptom criteria: despair, anxiety, and social withdrawal. The numerical ratings of symptoms were mainly in accordance with the findings from the qualitative analysis.

SIGNIFICANCE OF RESULTS: Despair, anxiety, and social withdrawal are common symptoms in depressed patients with incurable cancer, and, therefore, hypothesized as candidate symptom criteria. Other symptom criteria might need adjustment for improvement of relevance in this group of patients.

Keywords
Cancer, Depression, Major Depressive Disorder, Palliative Care, Classification
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-22961 (URN)10.1017/S1478951512000909 (DOI)000339610800006 ()23388067 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84908698794 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2014-09-12 Created: 2014-09-12 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
Bring, A., Söderlund, A., Wasteson, E. & Asenlof, P. (2012). Daily stressors in patients with acute whiplash associated disorders. Disability and Rehabilitation, 34(21), 1783-1789
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Daily stressors in patients with acute whiplash associated disorders
2012 (English)In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 34, no 21, p. 1783-1789Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: Stressors in acute whiplash associated disorders (WAD), as reported on a daily basis, have hitherto been neglected in research. The primary aim of this study was to describe the most stressful daily situation or event reported by individuals with acute WAD within a month of a whiplash trauma. Another aim was to describe the meaning and significance of these daily stressors, i.e. primary appraisal. Method: A descriptive design with a content analysis approach was used. 260 WAD-daily coping assessments (WAD-DCA) generated during 1 week by 51 participants with acute WAD were included in the study. Stressors were analysed using qualitative content analysis. Results: The reported stressors generated 13 categories covering a wide range of stressful situations in daily life related to (i) work, (ii) physical symptoms, (iii) feelings and cognitions, (iv) family and home responsibilities and (v) recreation. The majority of the stressors were appraised as "expected" as well as "disabling". Most threatening stressors were related to work, driving and feelings/cognitions. Conclusions: The wide variety of stressors indicates that it is not only pain itself that influences daily life in acute WAD. Early identification of individual and situation-specific stressors gives new data regarding what bothers individuals suffering from WAD after a collision and may be helpful in understanding the coping process in relation to specific stressors and stressor appraisals.

Keywords
Coping, daily assessments, whiplash associated disorders
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-17256 (URN)10.3109/09638288.2012.662571 (DOI)000307851800003 ()2-s2.0-84865378962 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2012-10-29 Created: 2012-10-27 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved
Knudsen, A. K., Aass, N., Heitzer, E., Klepstad, P., Hjermstad, M. J., Schippinger, W., . . . Wasteson, E. (2012). Interviews with patients with advanced cancer-another step towards an international cancer pain classification system. Supportive Care in Cancer, 20(10), 2491-2500
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Interviews with patients with advanced cancer-another step towards an international cancer pain classification system
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2012 (English)In: Supportive Care in Cancer, ISSN 0941-4355, E-ISSN 1433-7339, Vol. 20, no 10, p. 2491-2500Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Patients' involvement in the development of assessment tools is recommended, and the European Palliative Care Research Collaborative has adhered to this when developing a shared language for cancer pain, an international assessment and classification system. Study objectives were to investigate how patients ranked the relevance of several previously identified pain domains, to investigate patients' perception of the pain experience and to disclose additional, relevant pain domains for cancer pain classification to those identified in the literature. Semistructured interviews with advanced cancer patients treated with opioids were performed and analysed verbatim. Patients scored the relevance of predefined pain domains on an 11-point Numerical Rating Scale. Thirty-three Norwegian and Austrian patients were included (16 females and 17 males); the mean age was 63 years, and the mean Karnofsky performance score was 65. The ranking of domains was as follows etiology (mean Numerical Rating Scale score, 8.5), duration (8.0), intensity (7.4), coping (7.1), physical (5.9) and psychological functioning (5.8). Sleep was identified as a new candidate domain to include in the system. The patients emphasised consequences of having pain, for example, poor physical functioning and psychological distress. Previously identified pain domains were confirmed to be relevant to the patients; however, the ranking differed from the experts' ranking. Sleep disturbances may be added as a domain in a future classification system.

Keywords
Cancer; Classification; Pain; Palliative care; Qualitative method; PROs
National Category
Nursing Cancer and Oncology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-17283 (URN)10.1007/s00520-011-1361-z (DOI)000308193500031 ()2-s2.0-84868489435 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2012-10-30 Created: 2012-10-30 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved
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