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Volpati, Diogo
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Publications (10 of 12) Show all publications
Graça, J. S., Miyazaki, C. M., Shimizu, F. M., Volpati, D., Mejía-Salazar, J. R., Oliveira Jr, O. N. & Ferreira, M. (2018). On the importance of controlling film architecture in detecting prostate specific antigen. Applied Surface Science, 434, 1175-1182
Open this publication in new window or tab >>On the importance of controlling film architecture in detecting prostate specific antigen
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2018 (English)In: Applied Surface Science, ISSN 0169-4332, E-ISSN 1873-5584, Vol. 434, p. 1175-1182Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Immunosensors made with nanostructured films are promising for detecting cancer biomarkers, even at early stages of the disease, but this requires control of film architecture to preserve the biological activity of immobilized antibodies. In this study, we used electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) to detect Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA) with immunosensors produced with layer-by-layer (LbL) films containing anti-PSA antibodies in two distinct film architectures. The antibodies were either adsorbed from solutions in which they were free, or from solutions where they were incorporated into liposomes of dipalmitoyl phosphatidyl glycerol (DPPG). Incorporation into DPPG liposomes was confirmed with surface plasmon resonance experiments, while the importance of electrostatic interactions on the electrical response was highlighted using the Finite Difference Time-Domain Method (FDTD). The sensitivity of both architectures was sufficient to detect the threshold value to diagnose prostate cancer (ca. 4 ng mL−1). In contrast to expectation, the sensor with the antibodies incorporated into DPPG liposomes had lower sensitivity, though the range of concentrations amenable to detection increased, according to the fitting of the EIS data using the Langmuir-Freundlich adsorption model. The performance of the two film architectures was compared qualitatively by plotting the data with a multidimensional projection technique, which constitutes a generic approach for optimizing immunosensors and other types of sensors. 

Keywords
Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, Finite difference time-domain method, Immunosensor, Layer-by-layer, Liposome
National Category
Materials Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-32286 (URN)10.1016/j.apsusc.2017.10.122 (DOI)000419116600135 ()2-s2.0-85033572501 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-12-06 Created: 2017-12-06 Last updated: 2019-08-06Bibliographically approved
Thapa, A., Soares, A. C., Soares, J. C., Awan, I. T., Volpati, D., Melendez, M. E., . . . Oliveira, O. N. . (2017). Carbon Nanotube Matrix for Highly Sensitive Biosensors To Detect Pancreatic Cancer Biomarker CA19-9. ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, 9(31), 25878-25886
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Carbon Nanotube Matrix for Highly Sensitive Biosensors To Detect Pancreatic Cancer Biomarker CA19-9
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2017 (English)In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252, Vol. 9, no 31, p. 25878-25886Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Biosensors fabricated with nanomaterials promise faster, cheaper, and more efficient alternatives to traditional, often bulky devices for early cancer diagnosis. In this study, we fabricated a thin film sensing unit on interdigitated gold electrodes combining polyethyleneimine and carbon nanotubes in a layer by layer fashion, onto which antibodies anti-CA19-9 were adsorbed with a supporting layer of N-hydroxysuccini-mide and 1-ethyl-3 (3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide solution. By use of impedance spectroscopy, the pancreatic cancer biomarker CA19-9 was detected in a buffer with limit of detection of 0.35 U/mL. This high sensitivity allowed for distinction between samples of blood serum from patients with distinct probabilities to develop pancreatic cancer. The selectivity of the biosensor was confirmed in subsidiary experiments with HT-29 and SW-620 cell lines and possible interferents, e.g., p53 protein, ascorbic acid, and glucose, where significant changes in capacitance could only be measured with HT-29 that contained the CA19-9 biomarker. Chemisorption of CA19-9 molecules onto the layer of anti-CA19-9 antibodies was the mechanism responsible for sensing while electrostatic interactions drove the adsorption of carbon nanotubes, according to polarization modulated infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (PM-IRRAS). The adsorption behavior was successfully described by the Langmuir-Freundlich isotherm.

Keywords
cancer, biomarkers, immunosensors, carbon nanotubes, impedance spectroscopy
National Category
Materials Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-31867 (URN)10.1021/acsami.7b07384 (DOI)000407540400025 ()28696659 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85027237112 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-10-17 Created: 2017-10-17 Last updated: 2018-02-22Bibliographically approved
Massey, M., Kotsialos, A., Volpati, D., Vissol-Gaudin, E., Pearson, C., Bowen, L., . . . Petty, M. (2016). Evolution of Electronic Circuits using Carbon Nanotube Composites. Scientific Reports, 6(32197)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Evolution of Electronic Circuits using Carbon Nanotube Composites
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2016 (English)In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 6, no 32197Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

volution-in-materio concerns the computer controlled manipulation of material systems using external stimuli to train or evolve the material to perform a useful function. In this paper we demonstrate the evolution of a disordered composite material, using voltages as the external stimuli, into a form where a simple computational problem can be solved. The material consists of single-walled carbon nanotubes suspended in liquid crystal; the nanotubes act as a conductive network, with the liquid crystal providing a host medium to allow the conductive network to reorganise when voltages are applied. We show that the application of electric fields under computer control results in a significant change in the material morphology, favouring the solution to a classification task.

National Category
Materials Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-28954 (URN)10.1038/srep32197 (DOI)
Available from: 2016-09-27 Created: 2016-09-27 Last updated: 2017-11-21Bibliographically approved
Pavinatto, A., Delezuk, J. A. .., Souza, A. L., Pavinatto, F. J., Volpati, D., Miranda, P. B., . . . Oliveira Jr., O. N. (2016). Experimental evidence for the mode of action based on electrostatic and hydrophobic forces to explain interaction between chitosans and phospholipid Langmuir monolayers. Colloids and Surfaces B: Biointerfaces, 145, 201-207
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Experimental evidence for the mode of action based on electrostatic and hydrophobic forces to explain interaction between chitosans and phospholipid Langmuir monolayers
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2016 (English)In: Colloids and Surfaces B: Biointerfaces, ISSN 0927-7765, E-ISSN 1873-4367, Vol. 145, p. 201-207Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The interaction between chitosans and Langmuir monolayers mimicking cell membranes has been explained with an empirical scheme based on electrostatic and hydrophobic forces, but so far this has been tested only for dimyristoyl phosphatidic acid (DMPA). In this paper, we show that the mode of action in such a scheme is also valid for dipalmitoyl phosphatidyl choline (DPPC) and dipalmitoyl phosphatidyl glycerol (DPPG), whose monolayers were expanded and their compressibility modulus decreased by interacting with chitosans. In general, the effects were stronger for the negatively charged DPPG in comparison to DPPC, and for the low molecular weight chitosan (LMWChi) which was better able to penetrate into the hydrophobic chains than the high molecular weight chitosan (Chi). Penetration into the hydrophobic chains was confirmed with polarization-modulated infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (PM-IRRAS) and sum frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopy. A slight reduction in conformational order of the lipid chains induced by the chitosans was quantitatively estimated by measuring the ratio between the intensities of the methyl (r+) and methylene (d+) peaks in the SFG spectra for DPPG. The ratio decreased from 35.6 for the closely packed DPPG monolayer to 7.0 and 6.6 for monolayers containing Chi and LMWChi, respectively. Since in both cases there was a significant phospholipid monolayer expansion, the incorporation of chitosans led to chitosan-rich and lipid-rich condensed domains, which mantained conformational order for their hydrophobic tails. The stronger effects from LMWChi are ascribed to an easier access to the hydrophobic tails, as corroborated by measuring aggregation in solution with dynamic light scattering, where the hydrodynamic radius for LMWChi was close to half of that for Chi. Taken together, the results presented here confirm that the same mode of action applies to different phospholipids that are important constituents of mammalian (DPPC) and bacterial (DPPG) cell membranes.

Keywords
Chitosan, Conformation, Langmuir monolayers, PM-IRRAS, SFG
National Category
Physical Chemistry Condensed Matter Physics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-27742 (URN)10.1016/j.colsurfb.2016.05.001 (DOI)000381171800025 ()27182655 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84966657823 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-05-19 Created: 2016-05-19 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
Volpati, D., Mårtensson, N., Anttu, N., Viklund, P., Sundvall, C., Åberg, I., . . . Castillo-Leon, J. (2016). Spectroscopic investigations of arrays containing vertically and horizontally aligned silicon nanowires. Materials Research Express, 3(12), Article ID 125021.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Spectroscopic investigations of arrays containing vertically and horizontally aligned silicon nanowires
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2016 (English)In: Materials Research Express, ISSN 2053-1591, Vol. 3, no 12, article id 125021Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The properties of nanowire arrays have been investigated mainly in comparison with isolated nanowires or thin films, owing to the difficulty in controlling the nanowire alignment. In this study, we report on arrays containing vertically or horizontally aligned silicon nanowires, whose alignment and structure were determined using x-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. The Raman spectra of the nanowire arrays differ from those of isolated nanowires because of distinct heat dissipation rates of the absorbed energy from the laser, in agreement with recent theoretical calculations. The tailored alignment of the nanowires on solid substrates up to 1 inch of diameter also enabled the observation of resonance modes associated with light trapped into the nanowires. This was proven by comparing the light absorbed and scattered by the arrays, and may be exploited to enhance light harvesting in tandem solar cells. Significantly, the control of the assembly of nanowire arrays may have a direct impact on bottom-up technologies of high anisotropy nanomaterials.

Keywords
Anisotropy, Leaky-resonance modes, Nanostructured film, Nanowire array, Raman scattering, Silicon nanowires, Vertical self-Assembly
National Category
Materials Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-29819 (URN)10.1088/2053-1591/3/12/125021 (DOI)000390767900006 ()2-s2.0-85007440104 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-01-03 Created: 2017-01-03 Last updated: 2017-02-06Bibliographically approved
Barbosa, S. C., Nobre, T. M., Volpati, D., Ciancaglini, P., Cilli, E. M., Lorenzon, E. N. & Oliveira Jr., O. N. (2016). The Importance of Cyclic Structure for Labaditin on Its Antimicrobial Activity Against Staphylococcus aureus. Colloids and Surfaces B: Biointerfaces, 148, 453-459
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Importance of Cyclic Structure for Labaditin on Its Antimicrobial Activity Against Staphylococcus aureus
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2016 (English)In: Colloids and Surfaces B: Biointerfaces, ISSN 0927-7765, E-ISSN 1873-4367, Vol. 148, p. 453-459Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Antimicrobial resistance has reached alarming levels in many countries, thus leading to a search for new classes of antibiotics, such as antimicrobial peptides whose activity is exerted by interacting specifically with the microorganism membrane. In this study, we investigate the molecular-level mechanism of action for Labaditin (Lo), a 10-amino acid residue cyclic peptide from Jatropha multifida with known bactericidal activity againstStreptococcus mutans. We show that Lo is also effective against Staphylococcus aureus(S. aureus) but this does not apply to its linear analogue (L1). Using polarization-modulated infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (PM-IRRAS), we observed with that the secondary structure of Lo was preserved upon interacting with Langmuir monolayers from a phospholipid mixture mimicking S. aureus membrane, in contrast to L1. This structure preservation for the rigid, cyclic Lo is key for the self-assembly of peptide nanotubes that induce pore formation in large unilamellar vesicles (LUVs), according to permeability assays and dynamic light scattering measurements. In summary, the comparison between Labaditin (Lo) and its linear analogue L1 allowed us to infer that the bactericidal activity of Lo is more related to its interaction with the membrane. It does not require specific metabolic targets, which makes cyclic peptides promising for antibiotics without bacteria resistance.

Keywords
Antimicrobial peptide, Cyclic peptides, Labaditin, Langmuir monolayers, Large unilamellar vesicles, Peptide nanotubes, PM-IRRAS, Staphylococcus aureus
National Category
Physical Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-28955 (URN)10.1016/j.colsurfb.2016.09.017 (DOI)000388248500051 ()27665378 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84988644078 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-09-27 Created: 2016-09-27 Last updated: 2017-11-21Bibliographically approved
Almeida, T. P., Miyazaki, C. M., Volpati, D., Silva, T. A., Braunger, M. L., Barros, A., . . . Riul Jr, A. (2016). Ultra-Thin Films of Reduced Graphene Oxide (RGO) Nanoplatelets Functionalized with Different Organic Materials. Journal of Bioprocessing & Biotechniques, 6(3), Article ID 1000272.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Ultra-Thin Films of Reduced Graphene Oxide (RGO) Nanoplatelets Functionalized with Different Organic Materials
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2016 (English)In: Journal of Bioprocessing & Biotechniques, ISSN 2155-9821, Vol. 6, no 3, article id 1000272Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This work aims the functionalization of reduced graphene oxide nanoplatelets with chitosan (G-chitosan) and also with poly(styrenesulfonic acid) (GPSS), thus forming stable, dispersed aqueous solutions. G-chitosan and GPSS solutions allowed the layer-by-layer (LbL) film formation with glucose oxidase (GOx), establishing multilayered nanostructures with elevated control in thickness and morphology. The graphene nanoplatelets were characterized by UV-vis and FTIR spectroscopies, resulting in good adherence and linear deposition of the graphene nanoplatelets with GOx in the LbL structures.Cyclic voltammetry shows an enlargement in the current intensity with increasing number of deposited LbL layers, possibly owing to the formation of conducting paths by the graphene nanoplatelets in the tailored multilayer nanomaterial formed

National Category
Condensed Matter Physics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-27389 (URN)10.4172/2155-9821.1000272 (DOI)
Available from: 2016-04-12 Created: 2016-04-12 Last updated: 2016-04-21Bibliographically approved
Massey, M. K., Kotsialos, A., Qaiser, F., Zeze, D. A., Pearson, C., Volpati, D., . . . Pettyl, M. C. (2015). Computing with carbon nanotubes: Optimization of threshold logic gates using disordered nanotube/polymer composites. Journal of Applied Physics, 117(13), Article ID 134903.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Computing with carbon nanotubes: Optimization of threshold logic gates using disordered nanotube/polymer composites
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2015 (English)In: Journal of Applied Physics, ISSN 0021-8979, E-ISSN 1089-7550, Vol. 117, no 13, article id 134903Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper explores the use of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT)/poly(butyl methacrylate) composites as a material for use in unconventional computing. The mechanical and electrical properties of the materials are investigated. The resulting data reveal a correlation between the SWCNT concentration/viscosity/conductivity and the computational capability of the composite. The viscosity increases significantly with the addition of SWCNTs to the polymer, mechanically reinforcing the host material and changing the electrical properties of the composite. The electrical conduction is found to depend strongly on the nanotube concentration; Poole-Frenkel conduction appears to dominate the conductivity at very low concentrations (0.11% by weight). The viscosity and conductivity both show a threshold point around 1% SWCNT concentration; this value is shown to be related to the computational performance of the material. A simple optimization of threshold logic gates shows that satisfactory computation is only achieved above a SWCNT concentration of 1%. In addition, there is some evidence that further above this threshold the computational efficiency begins to decrease. (C) 2015 AIP Publishing LLC.

National Category
Condensed Matter Physics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-27283 (URN)10.1063/1.4915343 (DOI)000352645100043 ()
Available from: 2016-04-12 Created: 2016-03-19 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
Volpati, D., Spada, E. R., Pla Cid, C. C., Sartorelli, M. L., Aroca, R. F. & Constantino, C. J. (2015). Exploring copper nanostructures as highly uniform and reproducible substrates for plasmon-enhanced fluorescence. The Analyst, 140(2), 476-482
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Exploring copper nanostructures as highly uniform and reproducible substrates for plasmon-enhanced fluorescence
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2015 (English)In: The Analyst, ISSN 0003-2654, E-ISSN 1364-5528, Vol. 140, no 2, p. 476-482Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The unique properties of metallic nanostructures of coinage metals that can sustain localized surface plasmon resonances (LSPR) put them at the centre of plasmon-enhanced phenomena. The theory of plasmonic phenomena based on LSPR is well-established. However, the fabrication of plasmonic substrates, reproducibly, is still challenging for applications in surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) and surface-enhanced fluorescence (SEF). In this work we describe well-ordered copper nanostructures (CuNSs), produced by electrodeposition and nanosphere lithography, as active substrates for SEF. After a detailed spectroscopic and microscopic characterization, CuNSs are successfully applied as SEF-active substrates using a well-known perylene derivative as a target molecule. The signal reproducibility from CuNS substrates was established by comparing the results against those obtained from a simply roughened Cu substrate. Under optimal conditions, signal variability is around 4%.

National Category
Condensed Matter Physics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-27287 (URN)10.1039/c4an00889h (DOI)000346304200011 ()25416536 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-04-12 Created: 2016-03-19 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
Volpati, D., Massey, M. K., Johnson, D. W., Kotsialos, A., Qaiser, F., Pearson, C., . . . Petty, M. C. (2015). Exploring the alignment of carbon nanotubes dispersed in a liquid crystal matrix using coplanar electrodes. Journal of Applied Physics, 117(12), Article ID 125303.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Exploring the alignment of carbon nanotubes dispersed in a liquid crystal matrix using coplanar electrodes
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2015 (English)In: Journal of Applied Physics, ISSN 0021-8979, E-ISSN 1089-7550, Vol. 117, no 12, article id 125303Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We report on the use of a liquid crystalline host medium to align single-walled carbon nanotubes in an electric field using an in-plane electrode configuration. Electron microscopy reveals that the nanotubes orient in the field with a resulting increase in the DC conductivity in the field direction. Current versus voltage measurements on the composite show a nonlinear behavior, which was modelled by using single-carrier space-charge injection. The possibility of manipulating the conductivity pathways in the same sample by applying the electrical field in different (in-plane) directions has also been demonstrated. Raman spectroscopy indicates that there is an interaction between the nanotubes and the host liquid crystal molecules that goes beyond that of simple physical mixing.

National Category
Condensed Matter Physics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-27284 (URN)10.1063/1.4916080 (DOI)000352315700050 ()
Available from: 2016-04-12 Created: 2016-03-19 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
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