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Gustavsson, Leif
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Publications (10 of 196) Show all publications
Hemström, K., Mahapatra, K. & Gustavsson, L. (2013). Swedish private forest owners' perceptions and intentions with respect to adopting exotic tree species. European Journal of Forest Research, 132(3), 433-444
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Swedish private forest owners' perceptions and intentions with respect to adopting exotic tree species
2013 (English)In: European Journal of Forest Research, ISSN 1612-4669, E-ISSN 1612-4677, Vol. 132, no 3, p. 433-444Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Swedish forest growth can be increased through intensive forestry practices, enabling an increased use of forest biomass for climate-change mitigation. However, the diffusion of such practices depends on the forest owners' adoption of them. We study Swedish private forest owners' perceptions and intentions with respect to increasing forest growth by adopting exotic tree species. The results of a mail-in questionnaire survey show that although a majority of forest owners desire increasing forest growth, most owners have only a basic understanding of exotic tree species and a smaller proportion is interested in adopting them. The intention to adopt exotics seems to depend on the perceived performance of the species with respect to the economic aspects of forest management rather than on environmental or recreational concerns. Whereas a knowledge gap among the private forest owners regarding how to increase forest growth is implied, forest owners with higher self-rated knowledge of forestry and exotics have stronger intentions to adopt such species.

Keywords
private forest owners, intensive forestry, perceptions, exotics, Sweden
National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-18203 (URN)10.1007/s10342-013-0682-5 (DOI)000317422900003 ()2-s2.0-84876085494 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2013-01-09 Created: 2013-01-09 Last updated: 2018-01-11Bibliographically approved
Eriksson, L. O., Gustavsson, L., Hänninen, R., Kallio, M., Lyhykäinen, H., Pingoud, K., . . . Valsta, L. (2012). Climate change mitigation through increased wood use in the European construction sector - towards an integrated modelling framework. European Journal of Forest Research, 131(1), 131-144
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Climate change mitigation through increased wood use in the European construction sector - towards an integrated modelling framework
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2012 (English)In: European Journal of Forest Research, ISSN 1612-4669, E-ISSN 1612-4677, Vol. 131, no 1, p. 131-144Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Using wood as a building material affects the carbon balance through several mechanisms. This paper describes a modelling approach that integrates a wood product substitution model, a global partial equilibrium model, a regional forest model and a stand-level model. Three different scenarios were compared with a business-as-usual scenario over a 23-year period (2008-2030). Two scenarios assumed an additional one million apartment flats per year will be built of wood instead of non-wood materials by 2030. These scenarios had little effect on markets and forest management and reduced annual carbon emissions by 0.2-0.5% of the total 1990 European GHG emissions. However, the scenarios are associated with high specific CO2 emission reductions per unit of wood used. The third scenario, an extreme assumption that all European countries will consume 1-m3 sawn wood per capita by 2030, had large effects on carbon emission, volumes and trade flows. The price changes of this scenario, however, also affected forest management in ways that greatly deviated from the partial equilibrium model projections. Our results suggest that increased wood construction will have a minor impact on forest management and forest carbon stocks. To analyse larger perturbations on the demand side, a market equilibrium model seems crucial. However, for that analytical system to work properly, the market and forest regional models must be better synchronized than here, in particular regarding assumptions on timber supply behaviour. Also, bioenergy as a commodity in market and forest models needs to be considered to study new market developments; those modules are currently missing

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2012
Keywords
Climate change mitigation, Integrated modelling, Wood substitution, Forest economics, Forest management, Wood construction
National Category
Environmental Sciences Climate Research
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-13495 (URN)10.1007/s10342-010-0463-3 (DOI)000297521200012 ()2-s2.0-81955163080 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2011-04-08 Created: 2011-04-08 Last updated: 2017-12-11Bibliographically approved
Aabrekk, S., Tommerup, H., Svendsen, S., Mahapatra, K., Gustavsson, L., Paiho, S. & Ala-Juusela, M. (2012). Deliverable 2.2 Possible market strategies for one stop shops of renovation of single family house.: Report prepared for Nordic Innovation Centre.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Deliverable 2.2 Possible market strategies for one stop shops of renovation of single family house.: Report prepared for Nordic Innovation Centre
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2012 (English)Report (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The document describes examples of missions, visions and strategies based on the potentialpiloting models defined in report 3.2. It is based on status of interest amongst thestakeholders, and the information, figures and challenges which were discussed in the reportD 2.1 Stakeholder interests. The different service models will request different missionsdepending on the stakeholder in charge of the model. Also visions and strategies could bedifferent depending on the composition of services (core business) offered within each pilot aswell as the additional services offered by sub suppliers and the network connected to the pilot.In the report D2.1 Stakeholders interests, the following 5 different piloting models aresuggested:Type 1 Joint venture of industry, retailers and contractorsType 2 Joint venture of construction/renovation, industry and architect/engineering companiesType 3 Complementary businesses expand their business into renovationType 4 Joint venture of type house producer, bank and home owner associationType 5 Energy/building consultant, real estate agent and financing institutions, e.g. bankIn this report we have described mission, vision and market strategies for 4 existing orproposed models; The Project Manager by Bolig Enøk, from Norway (type 1), ENRA concept(type 2) and K-Rauta & Rautia (type 3) from Finland, and ProjectLavenergi (type 2) fromDenmark. Cleantech by Dong Energy (type 3) from Denmark is also addressed, but notdescribed in detail. As there is no concrete examples representing two of the models fromD2.1 (types 4 and 5), we have made a theoretical exercise in developing mission, vision andmarket strategies for type 5 model, while type 4 is not handled.It may be concluded that there are commercial actors in different parts of the value chainwhich see an opportunity in developing different approaches of “one stop shops” for energyefficient holistic renovations. The concepts are still in a development phase and differ inrespect to how they are organised (as supply side). We may say that the pilots in the differentcountries also find inspiration from each other through this research project. Due to thecomplexity of a holistic renovation project, it is a prerequisite with good partnerships even inthe development phase. In all identified models there is however one main actor taking thelead and ownership to the business model.Independent of the business model the responsible company needs to make some strategicchoices. The starting point is the SWOT analysis which sums up all major challenges for therespective business model. How the strategies should be developed is described in this report.Although the main target group for this report is companies seeing an interest in developingbusiness models for renovation, we found some important issues identified in the SWOTanalysis which the authorities may influence including lack of interest in the market (need ofmore public attention through holistic campaigns), fragmented solutions (stop subsidisingsingle measures without a holistic plan), serious vs unserious companies (need of certificationsystems to build credibility), cost focus leads to limited renovation (need of subventionschemes for holistic retrofitting including tax deduction measures) and finally lack incompetence within companies (need of support to training and collaboration acrosscompanies).

Publisher
p. 26
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-17901 (URN)
Projects
Successful Sustainable Renovation Business for Single-Family Houses - SuccessFamilies
Available from: 2012-12-18 Created: 2012-12-18 Last updated: 2012-12-19Bibliographically approved
Mahapatra, K., Gustavsson, L., Haavik, T., Aabrekk, S., Vanhoutteghem, L., Svendsen, S., . . . Ala-Juusela, M. (2012). Deliverable 3.3 Summary Report on one-stop-shop service for sustainable renovation of single family house: Report prepared for Nordic Innovation Centre.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Deliverable 3.3 Summary Report on one-stop-shop service for sustainable renovation of single family house: Report prepared for Nordic Innovation Centre
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2012 (English)Report (Other academic)
Publisher
p. 26
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-17905 (URN)
Projects
Successful Sustainable Renovation Business for Single-Family Houses - SuccessFamilies
Available from: 2012-12-18 Created: 2012-12-18 Last updated: 2012-12-19Bibliographically approved
Dodoo, A., Gustavsson, L. & Sathre, R. (2012). Effect of thermal mass on life cycle primary energy balances of a concrete- and a wood-frame building. Applied Energy, 92(1), 462-472
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effect of thermal mass on life cycle primary energy balances of a concrete- and a wood-frame building
2012 (English)In: Applied Energy, ISSN 0306-2619, E-ISSN 1872-9118, Vol. 92, no 1, p. 462-472Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this study we analyze the effect of thermal mass on space heating energy use and life cycle primary energy balances of a concrete- and a wood-frame building. The analysis includes primary energy use during the production, operation and end-of-life phases. Based on hourby- hour dynamic modeling of heat flows in building mass configurations we calculate the energy saving benefits of thermal mass during the operation phase of the buildings. Our results indicate that the energy savings due to thermal mass is small and varies with the climatic location and energy efficiency levels of the buildings. A concrete-frame building has slightly lower space heating demand than a wood-frame alternative, due to the benefit of thermal mass inherent in concrete-based materials. Still, a wood-frame building has a lower life cycle primary energy balance than a concrete-frame alternative. This is due primarily to the lower production primary energy use and greater bioenergy recovery benefits of the wood-frame buildings. These advantages outweigh the energy saving benefits of thermal mass. We conclude that the influence of thermal mass on space heating energy use for buildings located in Nordic climate is small and that wood-frame buildings with CHP-based district heating would be an effective means of reducing primary energy use in the built environment.

Keywords
Buildings; Concrete; Wood; Thermal mass; Dynamic modeling; Life cycle primary energy
National Category
Civil Engineering Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-14944 (URN)10.1016/j.apenergy.2011.11.017 (DOI)000300463800052 ()2-s2.0-83455260407 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2011-11-28 Created: 2011-11-28 Last updated: 2017-12-08Bibliographically approved
Nair, G., Mahapatra, K. & Gustavsson, L. (2012). Implementation of energy efficient windows in Swedish single-family houses. Applied Energy, 89(1), 329-338
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Implementation of energy efficient windows in Swedish single-family houses
2012 (English)In: Applied Energy, ISSN 0306-2619, E-ISSN 1872-9118, Vol. 89, no 1, p. 329-338Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A questionnaire survey of 1010 homeowners in Jamtland and Vasternorrland, which are two counties in central Sweden, was conducted to understand the factors influencing their decision to install energy-efficient windows. We complemented this survey with an interview of 12 window sellers/installers in the county Jamtland. The annual energy cost reduction, age, and condition of the windows were the most important reasons for the window replacement decision. Approximately 80% of the respondents replaced their windows with energy-efficient windows with U-value of 1.2 W/m(2) K. Condensation problems, perceived higher prices, and lack of awareness about windows with lower U-values were important reasons for non-adoption of more energy-efficient windows. Window sellers/installers have a strong influence on homeowners' window selection that was indicated by the 97% of homeowners who bought the windows that were recommended to them. Sellers/installers revealed that they did not recommend windows with U-value of less than 1.2 W/m(2) K because they thought that investing in such windows was not economical and because windows with U-value less than 1.2 W/m(2) K could cause water condensation on the external surface of window pane.

Keywords
Energy-efficient windows; Homeowners; Installers; Sellers; Sweden; U-value
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-14394 (URN)10.1016/j.apenergy.2011.07.040 (DOI)000296114700039 ()2-s2.0-80053294916 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2011-08-25 Created: 2011-08-25 Last updated: 2017-12-08Bibliographically approved
Mahapatra, K., Gustavsson, L. & Hemström, K. (2012). Multi-storey wood-frame buildings in Germany, Sweden and the UK. Construction Innovation, 12(1), 62-85
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Multi-storey wood-frame buildings in Germany, Sweden and the UK
2012 (English)In: Construction Innovation, ISSN 1471-4175, E-ISSN 1477-0857, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 62-85Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to analyse the influence of regulations, perceptions, and promotions on the emergence of an innovation system for wood-framed multi-storey buildings in Germany, Sweden and the United Kingdom (UK). Design/methodology/approach - This descriptive paper made a qualitative analysis of information collected mainly from secondary sources such as reports, newspapers, journal publications, conference proceedings and general internet search. Findings - Results showed that the conditions for market growth of multi-storey construction seemed to be the most favourable in Sweden followed by the UK and Germany. The regulations are stringent in Germany, followed by the UK and Sweden. In all countries, the construction professionals seemed to have negative perceptions regarding engineering properties of wood. Similar negative perceptions exist among the general public in Germany and the UK, but not in Sweden. The wood construction promotional activities in Germany and the UK are directed to all types of houses, while in Sweden multi-storey buildings are targeted. Research limitations/implications - An important implication of this paper was that it highlighted the usefulness of cross-country surveys at the European level, in order to better understand observed differences in the adoption of innovative systems. However, there might be shortcomings in the comparability of the information across the countries analysed because it was difficult to make an objective assessment of the claims made in some of the information sources. Also, there was varying and limited information about the survey methodologies used in some of the reviewed studies. Practical implications - The study showed that market intervention is needed to promote radical or really new innovations such as wood construction. The variations in the promotional measures undertaken partly explained the variations in growth of wood construction system in the three countries. Originality/value - The paper applied a theoretical framework on technology transition to analyse emergence of wood construction system in Germany, Sweden and the UK. The framework can be applied to analyse the development of wood construction system in other countries also. Copyright © 2012 Emerald Group Publishing Limited. All rights reserved.

Keywords
Construction industry; Germany; Innovation system; Multi-storey buildings; Sweden; United Kingdom; Wood frames; Wood technology
National Category
Civil Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-16745 (URN)10.1108/14714171211197508 (DOI)2-s2.0-84855520888 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2012-08-20 Created: 2012-08-17 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved
Poudel, B. C., Sathre, R., Bergh, J., Gustavsson, L., Lundström, A. & Hyvönen, R. (2012). Potential effects of intensive forestry on biomass production and total carbon balance in north-central Sweden. Environmental Science and Policy, 15(1), 106-124
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Potential effects of intensive forestry on biomass production and total carbon balance in north-central Sweden
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2012 (English)In: Environmental Science and Policy, ISSN 1462-9011, E-ISSN 1873-6416, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 106-124Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We quantify the potential effects of intensive forest management activities on forest production in north-central Sweden over the next 100 years, and calculate the potential climate change mitigation feedback effect due to the resulting increased carbon stock and increased use of forest products. We analyze and compare four different forest management scenarios (Reference, Environment, Production, and Maximum), all of which include the expected effects of climate change based on SRES B2 scenario. Forest management practices are intensified in Production scenario, and further intensified in Maximum scenario. Four different models, BIOMASS, HUGIN, Q-model, and Substitution model, were used to quantify net primary production, forest production and harvest potential, soil carbon, and biomass substitution of fossil fuels and non-wood materials, respectively. After integrating the models, our results show that intensive forestry may increase forest production by up to 26% and annual harvest by up to 19%, compared to the Reference scenario. The greatest single effect on the carbon balance is from using increased biomass production to substitute for fossil fuels and energy intensive materials. Carbon stocks in living tree biomass, forest soil and wood products also increase. In total, a net carbon emission reduction of up to 132 Tg (for Maximum scenario) is possible during the next 100 years due to intensive forest management in two Swedish counties, Jämtland and Västernorrland. 

Keywords
Carbon emission reduction; Climate change; Forest biomass; Forest management; Wood substitution
National Category
Environmental Sciences Forest Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-14713 (URN)10.1016/j.envsci.2011.09.005 (DOI)000301326000011 ()2-s2.0-83255187159 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2011-11-11 Created: 2011-11-11 Last updated: 2017-12-08Bibliographically approved
Joelsson, J. M. & Gustavsson, L. (2012). Reductions in greenhouse gas emissions and oil use by DME (di-methyl ether) and FT (Fischer-Tropsch) diesel production in chemical pulp mills. Energy, 39(1), 363-374
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Reductions in greenhouse gas emissions and oil use by DME (di-methyl ether) and FT (Fischer-Tropsch) diesel production in chemical pulp mills
2012 (English)In: Energy, ISSN 0360-5442, E-ISSN 1873-6785, Vol. 39, no 1, p. 363-374Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Using energy systems analysis, we examine the potential to reduce CO 2 emissions and oil use by integrating motor biofuel production with pulp mills. BLG-DME (black liquor gasification with di-methyl ether production) is compared with solid biomass gasification with BIG-FT (solid biomass gasification with Fischer-Tropsch fuel production). The studied systems are expanded with stand-alone production of biomass-based electricity and motor fuel so that they yield the same functional unit in terms of motor fuel and electricity as well as pulp or paper product, in order to facilitate comparison. More motor biofuel can be produced in integration with the studied mills with BLG-DME than with BIG-FT because the black liquor flow is large compared with other fuel streams in the mill and the integration potential for BIG-FT is limited by the mill’s heat demand. When both systems are required to produce the same functional unit, the BLG-DME system achieves higher system efficiency and larger reductions in CO 2 emissions and oil use per unit of biomass consumed. In general, integration of motor biofuel production with a pulp mill is more efficient than stand-alone motor biofuel production. Larger reductions in CO 2 emissions or oil use can, however, be achieved if biomass replaces coal or oil in stationary applications. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.

Keywords
Biorefineries; Black liquor gasification; CO 2 emission reduction; Motor biofuels; Oil use reduction
National Category
Environmental Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-16740 (URN)10.1016/j.energy.2012.01.001 (DOI)000302386400040 ()2-s2.0-84857691649 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2012-08-21 Created: 2012-08-17 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved
Joelsson, J. & Gustavsson, L. (2012). Swedish biomass strategies to reduce CO 2 emission and oil use in an EU context. Energy, 43(1), 448-468
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Swedish biomass strategies to reduce CO 2 emission and oil use in an EU context
2012 (English)In: Energy, ISSN 0360-5442, E-ISSN 1873-6785, Vol. 43, no 1, p. 448-468Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Swedish energy strategies for transportation, space heating and pulp industries were evaluated with a focus on bioenergy use. The aims were to 1) study trade-offs between reductions in CO 2 emission and oil use and between Swedish reductions and EU reductions, 2) compare the potential contributions of individual reduction measures, 3) quantify the total CO 2 emission and oil use reduction potentials. Swedish energy efficiency measures reduced EU CO 2 emission by 45-59 Mt CO 2/a, at current biomass use and constant oil use. Doubling Swedish bioenergy use yielded an additional 40 Mt CO 2/a reduction. Oil use could be reduced, but 36-81 kt of reductions in CO 2 emission would be lost per PJ of oil use reduction. Swedish fossil fuel use within the studied sectors could be nearly eliminated. The expansion of district heating and cogeneration of heat with a high electricity yield were important measures. Plug-in hybrid electric cars reduced CO 2 emission compared with conventional cars, and the difference was larger with increasing oil scarcity. The introduction of black liquor gasification in pulp mills also gave large CO 2 emission reduction. Motor fuel from biomass was found to be a feasible option when coal is the marginal fuel for fossil motor fuel production. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.

Keywords
Bioenergy strategy; CO 2 emission reduction; EU; Oil use reduction; Sweden
National Category
Other Environmental Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-16715 (URN)10.1016/j.energy.2012.03.050 (DOI)000305863400045 ()2-s2.0-84861773262 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2012-08-22 Created: 2012-08-17 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved
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