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Stage, J. (2018). Living in a bubble: potential gains from flexible water management policies. Applied Economics Letters, 25(19), 1368-1372
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Living in a bubble: potential gains from flexible water management policies
2018 (English)In: Applied Economics Letters, ISSN 1350-4851, E-ISSN 1466-4291, Vol. 25, no 19, p. 1368-1372Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We study Swedish implementation of the European Union’s Water Framework Directive, and compare the current implementation strategy with more flexible ‘bubble’ schemes, where measures can be traded among various locations within the same river system to reach the overall environmental target. Two different Swedish river systems, the Mörrum system with small-scale hydropower plants, and the Ångerman system with larger plants, are studied. We find that the environmental benefits that current policies are likely to accomplish could be achieved at well under half the cost in the Mörrum system, and at less than a tenth of the cost in the Ångerman system.

Keywords
ecological connectivity, hydropower, Sweden, Water framework directive
National Category
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-32765 (URN)10.1080/13504851.2017.1420882 (DOI)000441262800009 ()2-s2.0-85039857838 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-01-30 Created: 2018-01-30 Last updated: 2019-03-26Bibliographically approved
Stage, J. & Uwera, C. (2018). Prospects for establishing environmental satellite accounts in a developing country: The case of Rwanda. Journal of Cleaner Production, 200, 219-230
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Prospects for establishing environmental satellite accounts in a developing country: The case of Rwanda
2018 (English)In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 200, p. 219-230Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this paper, we discuss the beginning of Rwanda's current work on natural capital accounts. Many developing countries began similar work on environmental satellite accounts in the 1990s and early 2000s, only to abandon them a few years later when the initial political interest waned. The question arises, therefore, as to whether renewed interest in these accounts has the potential to have a longer-lasting impact on national accounting practices. In Rwanda's case, the decision was to begin satellite accounting work by focusing on resources where key economic trade-offs between different uses had already begun to be identified by policymakers, and where the gathering of economic statistics had already been improved as a result. It seems likely that this approach could lead to more durable satellite accounts, and that a similar approach would be feasible in many other countries.

Keywords
Environmental accounting, Natural capital accounting, Rwanda, System of environmental-economic accounting, Wealth accounting and the valuation of ecosystem services
National Category
Economics and Business
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-34606 (URN)10.1016/j.jclepro.2018.07.274 (DOI)000445715400020 ()2-s2.0-85053083276 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-10-03 Created: 2018-10-03 Last updated: 2018-10-16Bibliographically approved
Stage, J. & Uwera, C. (2018). Social cohesion in Rwanda: Results from a public good experiment. Development Policy Review, 36(5), 577-586
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Social cohesion in Rwanda: Results from a public good experiment
2018 (English)In: Development Policy Review, ISSN 0950-6764, E-ISSN 1467-7679, Vol. 36, no 5, p. 577-586Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We describe a public good experiment, a type of economic experiment commonly used to examine feelings of prosocialitythat is, behaviour which is positive, helpful and intended to promote social acceptance and friendshipand community cohesion, carried out in Rwanda. Contributions in different parts of the country are affected by the local intensity of the 1994 genocide, with more generous contributions being made in areas where violence was greater. This supports earlier research indicating that conflict experience leads to greater prosociality. However, we also find that people who have not, themselves, been targets of violence give lower contributions than people who have. The considerable group-related and regional differences in social behaviour may have implications for the country's policies to deal with social cohesion.

Keywords
common property management, conflict experience, public good experiment, Rwanda, social cohesion
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-34274 (URN)10.1111/dpr.12291 (DOI)000440548500004 ()2-s2.0-85054321539 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-08-17 Created: 2018-08-17 Last updated: 2018-12-06Bibliographically approved
Gebreegziabher, Z., Mekonnen, A., Stage, J. & Alemu, A. (2016). Climate change and the Ethiopian economy: A CGE analysis. Environment and Development Economics, 21(2), 205-225
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Climate change and the Ethiopian economy: A CGE analysis
2016 (English)In: Environment and Development Economics, ISSN 1355-770X, E-ISSN 1469-4395, Vol. 21, no 2, p. 205-225Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The paper analyzes the economic impacts of climate change-induced fluctuations on the performance of Ethiopia's agriculture, using a countrywide computable general equilibrium (CGE) model. We model the impacts on agriculture using a Ricardian model, where current agricultural production is modelled as a function of temperature and precipitation, among other things, and where future agriculture is assumed to follow the same climate function. The effect of overall climate change is projected to be relatively benign until approximately 2030, but will become considerably worse thereafter. Our simulation results indicate that, over a 50-year period, the projected reduction in agricultural productivity may lead to reductions in average income of some 20 per cent compared with the outcome that would have prevailed in the absence of climate change. This indicates that adaptation policies – both government planned and those that ease autonomous adaptation by farmers – will be crucial for Ethiopia's future development.

National Category
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-24794 (URN)10.1017/S1355770X15000170 (DOI)000371644600004 ()2-s2.0-84959493881 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council FormasSida - Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency
Note

Published online 5 June 2015.

Available from: 2015-04-03 Created: 2015-04-03 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
Uwera, C. & Stage, J. (2016). Individual status quo modelling for a rural water service in Rwanda: application of a choice experiment. Environment and Development Economics, 21(4), 490-511
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Individual status quo modelling for a rural water service in Rwanda: application of a choice experiment
2016 (English)In: Environment and Development Economics, ISSN 1355-770X, E-ISSN 1469-4395, Vol. 21, no 4, p. 490-511Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In Rwanda, rural water supply is not uniformly distributed. Rural areas are characterized by differences in the distance to the nearest water point and in water quality for domestic water, by watering frequency and water availability for irrigation water, and by the price for both. A household's perception of further improvements in water supply will, therefore, depend heavily on the situation it currently faces. The authors used a choice experiment to model how the individual status quo (SQ) affects preferences. Accounting for individual SQ information improves model significance relative to simply using the generic SQ parameter in the model, and the willingness to pay increases. Not using this information leads to a downward bias - and, in some cases, statistical insignificance - in estimates of households' valuation of health improvements linked to improved domestic water availability, as well as of increased watering frequency linked to the improved availability of irrigation water.

National Category
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-28748 (URN)10.1017/S1355770X15000364 (DOI)000380913200004 ()2-s2.0-84948979376 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-09-12 Created: 2016-09-12 Last updated: 2017-11-21Bibliographically approved
Stage, J., Christiernsson, A. & Söderholm, P. (2016). The economics of the Swedish individual transferable quota system: Experiences and policy implications. Marine Policy, 66, 15-20
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The economics of the Swedish individual transferable quota system: Experiences and policy implications
2016 (English)In: Marine Policy, ISSN 0308-597X, E-ISSN 1872-9460, Vol. 66, p. 15-20Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Sweden and other European Union countries are currently carrying out extensive work aimed at improving the marine and freshwater environment. The adaptive management approaches typically used for this require the development of new policy instruments and measures when needed, but also evaluations of instruments and measures already in use or under way. This paper reports on a study of the Swedish individual transferable quota system introduced in 2009 for the pelagic fishery. The new system was motivated mainly by economic arguments and, thus, the need to get incentives right. Despite this, the design of the Swedish system weakened the intended incentive effects in several ways, compared with the foreign systems that served as models. Moreover, the information needed for future evaluations was not collected, even though the need for future evaluations had been expressed explicitly and the data needs for this could be identified at the time that the system was introduced.

Keywords
Individual transferable quotas, Pelagic fishery, Policy design, Policy evaluation, Sweden
National Category
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-27308 (URN)10.1016/j.marpol.2016.01.001 (DOI)000371552800003 ()2-s2.0-84954305373 (Scopus ID)
Note

Article

Available from: 2016-03-21 Created: 2016-03-21 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
Humavindu, M. N. & Stage, J. (2015). Community based wildlife management failing to link conservation and financial viability. Paper presented at Environment for Development 7th Annual Meeting. Animal Conservation, 18(1), 4-13
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Community based wildlife management failing to link conservation and financial viability
2015 (English)In: Animal Conservation, ISSN 1367-9430, E-ISSN 1469-1795, Vol. 18, no 1, p. 4-13Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Given the considerable popularity of community-based wildlife management as a conservation tool, it is of interest to assess the long-run sustainability of this policy not only in conservation terms, but also in financial terms. In this paper, we use cost–benefit analysis to study the social and financial sustainability of a large set of community conservancies in Namibia, one of the few countries where community-based wildlife management policies have been in place long enough to assess their long-term viability. We find that, although the social sustainability is generally good, the financial sustainability is problematic – especially for the younger conservancies: there is no real link between conservation achievements and financial success. This calls into question the long-term sustainability of many of these conservancies: if they are unable to generate enough revenue to pay for their running expenditure, they will eventually fail – even if they are successful from a conservation point of view. Similar problems, linked to the way in which external funders have pushed for additional conservancies to be established regardless of financial considerations, are likely to be present in other countries that have implemented such programmes.

Keywords
benefit-sharing; community conservancies; community-based wildlife management; cost-benefit analysis; financial sustainability; policy; Namibia; southern Africa
National Category
Economics Ecology Social and Economic Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-20114 (URN)10.1111/acv.12134 (DOI)000348900200002 ()2-s2.0-84921515225 (Scopus ID)
Conference
Environment for Development 7th Annual Meeting
Projects
Agriculture in African countries - information and market power
Funder
Swedish Research Council FormasThe Jan Wallander and Tom Hedelius Foundation
Available from: 2013-11-04 Created: 2013-11-04 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
Humavindu, M. N. & Stage, J. (2015). Continuous financial support will be needed. Animal Conservation, 18(1), 18-19
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Continuous financial support will be needed
2015 (English)In: Animal Conservation, ISSN 1367-9430, E-ISSN 1469-1795, Vol. 18, no 1, p. 18-19Article in journal, Editorial material (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

Read the Feature Paper: Community-based wildlife management failing to link conservation and financial viability and the Commentaries on this Feature Paper: Wildlife conservation without financial viability? The potential for payments for dispersal areas' services in Namibia; Achieving ecological conservation impact is not enough: setting priorities based on multiple criteria Animal Conservation.

National Category
Earth and Related Environmental Sciences Economics and Business Economic Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-24350 (URN)10.1111/acv.12194 (DOI)000348900200005 ()2-s2.0-84921457051 (Scopus ID)
Note

Export Date: 9 February 2015

Available from: 2015-02-09 Created: 2015-02-09 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
Stage, J. (2015). The value of the Swedish eel fishery. Marine Resource Economics, 30(1), 21-34
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The value of the Swedish eel fishery
2015 (English)In: Marine Resource Economics, ISSN 0738-1360, Vol. 30, no 1, p. 21-34Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Traditional sectors such as agriculture and fishing often receive special treatment from policymakers because such sectors are perceived to be associated with traditional cultural public good values. However, these values are often difficult to measure and few attempts have been made to do so. The recent European Union eel management directive creates an unusually clear-cut trade-off between eel fishing and other agents affecting the European eel population. It is possible, therefore, to measure directly the perceived public good value of the eel fishery in terms of other economic costs that policymakers are willing to incur in order to maintain eel fishing. Using Swedish data, we find that Swedish policymakers value the public good aspect of the remaining Swedish eel fishery at at least SEK 34 million (approximately EUR 3.4 million) annually, which is more than the commercial eel fishery’s actual production value.

Keywords
Eel fishing, fisheries management, hydropower, public good valuation
National Category
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-22524 (URN)10.1086/679465 (DOI)000346734700002 ()2-s2.0-84929075691 (Scopus ID)
Projects
Water as an economic resource
Available from: 2014-07-25 Created: 2014-07-25 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
Paulrud, A., Stage, J. & Thangavelu, T. (2015). Valuation of angling site characteristics and visitation frequency: The case of the Lower End Ammer River and the Lower End Hårkan River. In: : . Paper presented at 21st Ulvön Conference on Environmental Economics.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Valuation of angling site characteristics and visitation frequency: The case of the Lower End Ammer River and the Lower End Hårkan River
2015 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Refereed)
National Category
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-24026 (URN)
Conference
21st Ulvön Conference on Environmental Economics
Projects
Water as an economic resource
Available from: 2014-12-31 Created: 2014-12-31 Last updated: 2015-05-11Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-7206-6568

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