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Publications (10 of 21) Show all publications
Nykvist, B. & Deutschmann, M. (2010). M-learning to empower the learner and to facilitate informal study groups. In: ICWE, Berlin (Ed.), eLearning Africa 2010, 5th International Conference on ICT for Development, Education and Training. Paper presented at eLearning Africa 2010, 5th International Conference on ICT for Development, Education and Training (pp. 356-359).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>M-learning to empower the learner and to facilitate informal study groups
2010 (English)In: eLearning Africa 2010, 5th International Conference on ICT for Development, Education and Training / [ed] ICWE, Berlin, 2010, p. 356-359Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
National Category
Pedagogy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-12434 (URN)
Conference
eLearning Africa 2010, 5th International Conference on ICT for Development, Education and Training
Available from: 2010-12-06 Created: 2010-12-06 Last updated: 2010-12-13Bibliographically approved
Deutschmann, M., Outakoski, H., Panichi, L. & Schneider, C. (2010). Virtual Learning, Real Heritage Benefits and Challenges of Virtual Worlds for the Learning of Indigenous Minority Languages. In: Pixel (Ed.), Conference Proceedings International Conference ICT for Language Learning3rd Conference Edition. Paper presented at International ICT for Language Learning 2010, Florence Italy.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Virtual Learning, Real Heritage Benefits and Challenges of Virtual Worlds for the Learning of Indigenous Minority Languages
2010 (English)In: Conference Proceedings International Conference ICT for Language Learning3rd Conference Edition / [ed] Pixel, 2010Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This paper will present the Island of Avalon Learning in the virtual world of Second Life® (SL). Avalon Learning has been created under the ongoing European project AVALON for the design, testing and implementation of language teaching and learning in virtual worlds. Avalon (Access to Virtual and Action Learning live ONline) is a 2 year multilateral project funded under the EU EACEA Life Long Learning Programme (LLP) and runs until December 2010. The 10 participating European partners include 5 state funded universities (University of Manchester, University of Vienna, University of Pisa, Molde University College and Mid Sweden University) and 5 other public and private organisations (Verein Grenzenlos — Interkultureller Austausch, Verein Offenes Lernen — Sektion ‘TALKADEMY’, ICC International Language Network (International Certificate Conference e. V.), LANCELOT School GmbH and the British Council) operating in the following areas: language education, teacher training, intercultural training, language testing and certification, online education, publishing, business communication and networking, design of 3D environments and language learning in virtual worlds.The project is also associated with 5 other universities and 11 smaller educational institutions. The project is a transversal programme which targets language learners from the Leonardo da Vinci, Erasmus and Grundtvig communities. Not only does the project aim to create a platform in which these diverse learning communities can come together but it also has a particular interest in providing access to technology and language learning to learners in remote locations. The ultimate aim of the project is to create both a virtual environment and a sustainable community of practitioners and users which will outlive the project itself. Recent literature in the field endorses virtual worlds as a particularly appropriate platform for the development of oral language proficiency in distance education, collaborative and intercultural learning contexts and vocational training. The free client programme of Second Life®, for example, is a 3D virtual world accessible via the Internet and which enables its users to interact with each other through ‘Avatars’. An ‘avatar’ is the graphical representation of a computer user representing himself/herself or alter ego and communication with others is possible via both voice and text chat. Examples of learning scenarios from the Beginners Course of North Sami carried out in conjunction with the Avalon project will help to illustrate some of the benefits and challenges of using virtual worlds for the teaching and learning of languages in general and for indigenous minority languages in particular. Some of the benefits include the provision of online synchronous communication for linguistic communities which are dispersed over vast geographical areas, the co/re-construction of cultural and linguistic identity, opportunities for authentic language contact between native, heritage and L2 learners, the unparalleled creative dimension of the platform in particular in terms of individual and collaborative building and learner movement and freedom within the environment. This paper will conclude with a discussion of some of the challenges of using virtual worlds as a distance education platform in different language education contexts and how they may be overcome.

Keywords
Samiska, Second Life, online learning
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-12583 (URN)9788876475696 (ISBN)8876475699 (ISBN)
Conference
International ICT for Language Learning 2010, Florence Italy
Available from: 2010-12-13 Created: 2010-12-13 Last updated: 2013-01-30Bibliographically approved
Deutschmann, M., Minugh, D., Hincks, R., Hudson, J., Shaw, P. & Nygren, Å. (2009). An Inter-University Platform for Sharing and Collaborating in English Studies: Creating SEED (Sweden's English Educational Database for tertiary education) (1ed.). In: Päivi Juvonen (Ed.), Language and Learning: Papers from the ASLA Symposium in Stockholm, 7-8 November, 2008 (pp. 127-140). Uppsala: Swedish Science Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>An Inter-University Platform for Sharing and Collaborating in English Studies: Creating SEED (Sweden's English Educational Database for tertiary education)
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2009 (English)In: Language and Learning: Papers from the ASLA Symposium in Stockholm, 7-8 November, 2008 / [ed] Päivi Juvonen, Uppsala: Swedish Science Press, 2009, 1, p. 127-140Chapter in book (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Abstract: SEED is a two-year nationally-funded Swedish project (2006-2008) intended to establish a bottom-up, self-sustaining inter-university Internet-based network among active teachers and students of English in Swedish universities. This report describes its concepts, organization, failures and successes, and the general lessons that can be learned from the experience of creating and implementing such a network. SEED provides university students and teachers of English with two components: (i) a collaborative space for joint projects and exchange of ideas and (ii) a database repository of learning objects in the field of English studies. The interactive collaborative section is currently hosted by the Stockholm University version of the Sakai VLE (“Mondo”), and via guest logins is available to researchers, teachers and students at all levels. The repository in database form (currently less developed) uses the MIT/HP system called DSpace, which permits full integration with international library practices for documentation and retrieval. Once fully launched, SEED may serve as a model for similar networks in other fields of language studies, or other university areas.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Uppsala: Swedish Science Press, 2009 Edition: 1
Series
ASLA:s skriftserie, ISSN 1100-5629 ; 22
National Category
Language Technology (Computational Linguistics)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-11119 (URN)978-91-87884-22-1 (ISBN)
Projects
SEED
Available from: 2010-01-15 Created: 2010-01-15 Last updated: 2018-01-12Bibliographically approved
Deutschmann, M., Panichi, L. & Molka-Danielsen, J. (2009). Designing oral participation in second life – a comparative study of two language proficiency courses. Paper presented at Eurocall 2008 Conference, Feb, 2008, Szekesfehervar, HUNGARY. ReCALL, 21(2), 206-226
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Designing oral participation in second life – a comparative study of two language proficiency courses
2009 (English)In: ReCALL, ISSN 0958-3440, E-ISSN 1474-0109, Vol. 21, no 2, p. 206-226Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The following paper presents two stages of an action research project involving two oral proficiency courses held in the virtual world Second Life. Course 1 was conducted during the Autumn of 2007. Based on the experiences of this course, we redesigned many aspects of it in order to improve student activity in terms of oral participation and gave the course again in Spring 2008. By analysing the recordings of four 90-minute sessions, two from each course, we were able to measure student participation based on floor space, turn lengths and turn-taking patterns, and in the study we discuss how different changes in design may have contributed to more favourable outcomes. Results seem to indicate that meaning focussed task design, which involves authenticity and collaborative elements, has a direct impact on learner participation and engagement. Furthermore, our results seem to suggest that technical and social initiations into a complex environment such as SL are important factors that have to be worked into the course design.

 

 

Keywords
Oral participation; CMC; Second Life; task design; turn-taking
National Category
Specific Languages
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-10641 (URN)10.1017/S0958344009000196 (DOI)000269987700006 ()2-s2.0-70450184341 (Scopus ID)
Conference
Eurocall 2008 Conference, Feb, 2008, Szekesfehervar, HUNGARY
Note

Eurocall 2008 Conference, FEB, 2008, Szekesfehervar, HUNGARY

Available from: 2010-01-10 Created: 2009-12-11 Last updated: 2018-01-12Bibliographically approved
Molka-Danielsen, J., Deutschmann, M. & Panichi, L. (2009). Designing Transient Learning Spaces in Second Life: - a case study based on the Kamimo experience. Designs for Learning, 2(2), 22-33
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Designing Transient Learning Spaces in Second Life: - a case study based on the Kamimo experience
2009 (English)In: Designs for Learning, ISSN 1654-7608, Vol. 2, no 2, p. 22-33Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Through the grant “Virtual Campus for Life Long Learning” (NUV, 2007), we have gained experience in the design and building of a virtual island or “sim” in Second Life for the purpose of education.  This paper discusses the virtual representations, tools, context and spaces used in courses. While SL can replicate the classroom lecture, it gives further opportunities for interactive and active teaching as learning activities can be in dispersed and diversified virtual spaces. These are transient learning spaces because participants, activities and representations are in frequent change. Designing transient learning spaces raises different challenges and opportunities from the traditional physical classroom. Challenges include enabling new users to know where to go or how to behave. One opportunity is the ability to design and develop a new space for each course. This article will help the teacher and “sim” designers to recognize the factors of designing effective transient learning spaces.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: Designs for Learning, 2009
Keywords
Second Life, design, language learning
National Category
Pedagogy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-12576 (URN)
Available from: 2010-12-13 Created: 2010-12-13 Last updated: 2010-12-13Bibliographically approved
Deutschmann, M. (2009). Enhancement of In-Service Teachers Training Programme through Mobile Phones in Tanzania. In: C&D-Learning: Adapting eLearning to Developing Countries: eLearning Africa 2009 - 4th International Conference on ICT for Development, Education and Training, Dakar (Senegal), 27-29 Mayo 2009. Paper presented at 4th International Conference on ICT for Development, Education and Training (pp. 17-19).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Enhancement of In-Service Teachers Training Programme through Mobile Phones in Tanzania
2009 (English)In: C&D-Learning: Adapting eLearning to Developing Countries: eLearning Africa 2009 - 4th International Conference on ICT for Development, Education and Training, Dakar (Senegal), 27-29 Mayo 2009, 2009, p. 17-19Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Keywords
mobile learning, Africa, teacher training
National Category
Pedagogy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-10771 (URN)978-3-941055-04-9 (ISBN)
Conference
4th International Conference on ICT for Development, Education and Training
Projects
ICT-Bites
Available from: 2009-12-22 Created: 2009-12-22 Last updated: 2009-12-28Bibliographically approved
Molka-Danielsen, J. & Deutschmann, M. (2009). Examining the Design of Learning Activities in Second Life through the Lens of Actvity Theory (1ed.). In: John Krogstie (Ed.), NOKOBIT 2009 (pp. 1-12). Trondheim: Tapir Akademisk Forlag
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Examining the Design of Learning Activities in Second Life through the Lens of Actvity Theory
2009 (English)In: NOKOBIT 2009 / [ed] John Krogstie, Trondheim: Tapir Akademisk Forlag, 2009, 1, p. 1-12Chapter in book (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Second Life (SL) has in recent years become accepted as a platform for educational activities, supporting a range of activities from informal meetings to complete courses offered in the 3D world as part of a university’s curriculum (Molka-Danielsen, 2009). Learning activities within SL can be identified as a form of e-learning[1], but one which in many ways differs from more traditional set-ups in Learning Management Systems (LMS). The goals and objectives of e-learning can vary widely. But, e-learning should ideally offer innovative ways of coming in contact with students. Such innovation can give universities access to new markets such as the support of distance students or lifelong learners. At present, e-learning for many universities is practiced as blended learning, and implemented more commonly through university administered LMSs. Studies support that most teachers do not innovate or change their way of teaching when adopting LMS systems. They use the LMS in the delivery of course content, but do not have learning activities that take advantage of the LMS functions that activate students or create relationships within groups. Similarly we hypothesize that teachers that are new adopters of SL may attempt to replicate real world classroom activities, instead of designing learning activities that take advantage of the pedagogic aspects of the SL environment. Such learning systems fail to support social constructivist pedagogies and as such the value to the students may be diminished. In this paper, we use the theoretical lens of Activity Theory to examine the operational mechanisms behind this issue.

[1] To give a more general definition, e-learning is the mediation of learning through mediating artifacts such as information communication technology (ICT).

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Trondheim: Tapir Akademisk Forlag, 2009 Edition: 1
Keywords
Teaching design, instructional approaches, Activity Theory, Second Life, mediating artifacts
National Category
Pedagogy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-10769 (URN)978-82-519-2493-1 (ISBN)
Available from: 2010-01-10 Created: 2009-12-22 Last updated: 2011-12-21Bibliographically approved
Hrastinski, S., Deutschmann, M. & Richardson, D. (2009). Framåtblick (1ed.). In: Stefan Hrastinski (Ed.), Nätbaserad utbildning: En introduktion (pp. 117-121). Lund: Studentlitteratur
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Framåtblick
2009 (English)In: Nätbaserad utbildning: En introduktion / [ed] Stefan Hrastinski, Lund: Studentlitteratur, 2009, 1, p. 117-121Chapter in book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lund: Studentlitteratur, 2009 Edition: 1
Keywords
nätutbildning
National Category
Pedagogy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-10768 (URN)978-91-44-05324-0 (ISBN)
Available from: 2009-12-22 Created: 2009-12-22 Last updated: 2011-12-20Bibliographically approved
Deutschmann, M. & Molka-Danielsen, J. (2009). Future Directions for Learning in Virtual Worlds (1ed.). In: Judith Molka-Danielsen & Mats Deutschmann (Ed.), Learning and Teaching in the Virtual World of Second Life (pp. 185-190). Trondheim, Norway: Tapir Akademisk Forlag
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Future Directions for Learning in Virtual Worlds
2009 (English)In: Learning and Teaching in the Virtual World of Second Life / [ed] Judith Molka-Danielsen & Mats Deutschmann, Trondheim, Norway: Tapir Akademisk Forlag, 2009, 1, p. 185-190Chapter in book (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Some may claim that this book has been a showcase of case studies, without common thread. However, the common goal that runs through each of these cases is the focus on learning and the roles of learners and educators in learning activities. Do virtual worlds assist learning and do they create new opportunities? The answer from these analyses is “Yes” and this book demonstrates “how” to make use of the affordances of the virtual word of Second Life as it exists today. Yet, many questions remain both for practitioners and researchers. To give some examples: On what principles should learners’ tasks be designed, who are doing research on education in virtual worlds and what is the future of virtual worlds in a learning context? In this chapter we attempt to address some of these issues.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Trondheim, Norway: Tapir Akademisk Forlag, 2009 Edition: 1
Keywords
Second Life, learning, design
National Category
Pedagogy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-10760 (URN)978-82-519-2353-8 (ISBN)
Available from: 2009-12-22 Created: 2009-12-22 Last updated: 2011-12-20Bibliographically approved
Deutschmann, M. & Panichi, L. (2009). Instructional Design. Teacher Practice and Learning Autonomy (1ed.). In: Judith Molka-Danielsen & Mats Deutschmann (Ed.), Learning and Teaching in the Virtual World of Second Life (pp. 27-44). Trondheim, Norway: Tapir Akademisk Forlag
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Instructional Design. Teacher Practice and Learning Autonomy
2009 (English)In: Learning and Teaching in the Virtual World of Second Life / [ed] Judith Molka-Danielsen & Mats Deutschmann, Trondheim, Norway: Tapir Akademisk Forlag, 2009, 1, p. 27-44Chapter in book (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

This chapter is based on the experiences from language proficiency courses given on Kamimo education island and addresses concerns related to teacher practice in Second Life. We examine preparatory issues, task design and the teacher’s role in fostering learner autonomy in Second Life. Although the chapter draws mainly on experiences from and reflections in the domain of language education, it has general pedagogical implications for teaching in SL.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Trondheim, Norway: Tapir Akademisk Forlag, 2009 Edition: 1
Keywords
Second Life, Best Practice, Language learning, Pedagogic Design
National Category
Language Technology (Computational Linguistics)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-10759 (URN)978-82-519-2353-8 (ISBN)
Available from: 2009-12-22 Created: 2009-12-22 Last updated: 2018-01-12Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-4429-5720

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