miun.sePublications
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Publications (10 of 65) Show all publications
Svensson, K., Eckerman, M., Alricsson, M., Magounakis, T. & Werner, S. (2018). Muscle injuries of the dominant or non-dominant leg in male football players at elite level. Knee Surgery, Sports Traumatology, Arthroscopy, 26(3), 933-937
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Muscle injuries of the dominant or non-dominant leg in male football players at elite level
Show others...
2018 (English)In: Knee Surgery, Sports Traumatology, Arthroscopy, ISSN 0942-2056, E-ISSN 1433-7347, Vol. 26, no 3, p. 933-937Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

PURPOSE: The aim was to study possible differences of muscle injuries regarding type, localization and the extent of injury between the dominant and non-dominant leg in elite male football players. Another aim was to study the injury incidence of muscle injuries of the lower extremity during match and training.

METHODS: Data were consecutively collected between 2007 and 2013 in a prospective cohort study based on 54 football players from one team of the Swedish first league. The injury incidence was calculated for both match and training, injuries to the hip adductors, quadriceps, hamstrings and triceps surae were diagnosed and evaluated with ultrasonography, and their length, depth and width were measured to determine the extent of structural muscle injuries.

RESULTS: Fifty-four players suffered totally 105 of the studied muscle injuries. Out of these 105 injuries, the dominant leg was affected in 53 % (n = 56) of the cases. A significantly greater extent of the injury was found in the dominant leg when compared with the non-dominant leg with regard to structural injuries of the hamstrings. No other significant differences were found.

CONCLUSIONS: Structural hamstring muscle injuries were found to be of greater extent in the dominant leg when compared with the non-dominant leg. This new finding should be taken into consideration when allowing the football player to return to play after leg muscle injuries.

LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: IV.

Keywords
Muscle tear, Soccer, Sonography, Strain, Ultrasound
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-28764 (URN)10.1007/s00167-016-4200-4 (DOI)000426099600036 ()27338959 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84976311723 (Scopus ID)
Note

First Online: 23 June 2016

Available from: 2016-09-13 Created: 2016-09-13 Last updated: 2018-03-19Bibliographically approved
Sinclair, C., Svantesson, U., Sjöström, R. & Alricsson, M. (2017). Differences in Pes Planus and Pes Cavus subtalar eversion/inversion before and after prolonged running, using a two-dimensional digital analysis. Journal of Exercise Rehabilitation, 13(2), 232-239
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Differences in Pes Planus and Pes Cavus subtalar eversion/inversion before and after prolonged running, using a two-dimensional digital analysis
2017 (English)In: Journal of Exercise Rehabilitation, ISSN 2288-176X, Vol. 13, no 2, p. 232-239Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In sports, there is a constant discussion about the hyper-pronation and supination of the foot during loading and its relation to injuries or dis-comfort. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the possi-ble differences in the subtalar joint in the midstance phase of running, between individuals with Pes Planus and Pes Cavus, after 5 min and 45 min of running. Thirty-four subjects, meeting the requirements for Pes Planus (30 feet) and Pes Cavus (35 feet), according to the criteria for Medial Longitudinal Arch-angle, were included in the study. The calca-neal vertical angle, representing the eversion/inversion of the subtalar joint, was measured using with two-dimensional digital analysis and Dartfish Software with the subjects running barefoot on a treadmill, be-fore and after 45 min of outside running wearing shoes. Both individuals with Pes Cavus and Pes Planus showed a significant increase in the calcaneal eversion (P < 0.05) after 45 min of running. Between the groups, there was a significantly greater eversion of the Pes Planus, on the right foot, after 45 min of running (P < 0.05) compared to the Pes Ca-vus. The effect of fatigue evident in the present study suggests that fur-ther biomechanical research should be considered when exposing the foot to the repetitive nature of running, conditions most likely responsi-ble for the overrepresented overuse injuries among runners. 

Keywords
Calcaneus deviation, Fatigue, Foot, Pronation, Subtalar joint, Supination
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-33381 (URN)10.12965/jer.1734902.451 (DOI)2-s2.0-85043680960 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-03-28 Created: 2018-03-28 Last updated: 2018-03-28Bibliographically approved
Ericsson, D., Östenberg Hafsteinsson, A., Andersson, E. & Alricsson, M. (2017). Test-retest reliability of repeated knee laxity measurements in the acute phase following a knee trauma using a Rolimeter. Journal of Exercise Rehabilitation, 13(5), 550-558
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Test-retest reliability of repeated knee laxity measurements in the acute phase following a knee trauma using a Rolimeter
2017 (English)In: Journal of Exercise Rehabilitation, ISSN 2288-176X, Vol. 13, no 5, p. 550-558Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The purpose was to examine the test-retest reliability of the Rolimeter measurement procedure in the acute time phase, following a substantial knee trauma. In total, 15 participants with acute knee trauma were examined by one single observer at three different time-points with the Rolimeter using a maximum force. The selected time-points were: baseline (0–7 days after the trauma), midpoint (3–4 weeks after the trauma), and endpoint (3–4 weeks after the trauma). The anterior-posterior displacement was recorded where the endpoint evaluation was used as the reference value. The mean anterior laxity scores remained constant over the measurement time-points for both knees, with an anterior laxity that was 2.7 mm higher (on average) in the injured than the noninjured knee (9.5 mm vs. 6.8 mm). The mean difference (i.e., bias) between laxity scores, for the injured knee, measured at endpoint versus baseline was 0.2±1.0 mm and −0.2±1.1 mm when measured at endpoint versus midpoint, with average typical errors of 0.7 and 0.8 mm and intra-class correlations that were very strong (both r=~0.93). For the same comparisons on the noninjured knee, systematic bias was close to zero (0.1±0.3 and −0.1±0.3 mm, respectively), and both the intra-class correlations were almost perfect (r=~0.99). The current study implicates that repeated Rolimeter measurements are relatively reliable for quantifying anterior knee laxity during the acute time-phases following knee trauma. Hence, the Rolimeter, in combination with manual tests, seems to be a valuable tool for identifying anterior cruciate ligament injuries.

Keywords
Anterior cruciate ligament, Arthrometer, Hemarthrosis, Instability, Knee joint
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-32309 (URN)10.12965/jer.1735104.552 (DOI)2-s2.0-85043697298 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-12-06 Created: 2017-12-06 Last updated: 2018-03-28Bibliographically approved
Ekström, A., Hafsteinsson Östenberg, A., Björklund, G. & Alricsson, M. (2017). The effects of introducing Tabata interval training and stability exercises to school children as a school-based intervention program. International Journal of Adolescent Medicine and Health
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The effects of introducing Tabata interval training and stability exercises to school children as a school-based intervention program
2017 (English)In: International Journal of Adolescent Medicine and Health, ISSN 0334-0139, E-ISSN 2191-0278Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Keywords
classroom exercise, exertion, physical activity, school exercise program
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-32469 (URN)10.1515/ijamh-2017-0043 (DOI)
Note

Published Online: 2017-11-23

Available from: 2017-12-15 Created: 2017-12-15 Last updated: 2017-12-21Bibliographically approved
Hébert-Losier, K., Wessman, C., Alricsson, M. & Svantesson, U. (2017). Updated reliability and normative values for the standing heel-rise test in healthy adults. Physiotherapy, 103(4), 446-452
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Updated reliability and normative values for the standing heel-rise test in healthy adults
2017 (English)In: Physiotherapy, ISSN 0031-9406, E-ISSN 1873-1465, Vol. 103, no 4, p. 446-452Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives: The heel-rise test is used to assess the strength and endurance of the plantar flexors in everyday clinical practice. However, several factors may affect outcomes, including sex, age, body mass index and activity level. The aims of this study were to revisit the reliability and normative values of this test, and establish normative equations accounting for several factors. Design: Cross-sectional observational study with test-retest. Setting: Community. Participants: Volunteers (n = 566, age 20 to 81 years). Interventions: Subjects performed single-legged heel rises to fatigue, standing on a 10° incline, once on each leg. A subset of subjects (n = 32) repeated the test 1 week later. Reliability was quantified using intraclass (ICC) correlation coefficients and Bland-Altman plots (mean difference [95% limits of agreement (LOA)]), whereas the impact of sex, age, body mass index and activity level on the number of heel rises was determined using non-parametric regression models. Results: The test showed excellent reliability (ICC = 1.0 right leg, 1.0 left leg), with mean between-day differences in the total number of heel-rise repetitions of 0.2 (95% LOA -6.2 to 6.5) and 0.1 (95% LOA -6.1 to 6.2) for right and left legs, respectively. Overall, males completed more repetitions than females (median 24 vs 21). However, older females (age >60. years) outperformed older males. According to the model, younger males with higher activity levels can complete the most heel rises. Conclusions: The heel-rise test is highly reliable. The regression models herein can be employed by clinicians to evaluate the outcomes of heel-rise tests of individuals against a comparable normative population.

Keywords
Lower extremity, Muscle strength, Physical examination, Regression analysis, Rehabilitation, Reproducibility of results
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-32204 (URN)10.1016/j.physio.2017.03.002 (DOI)000415611100015 ()28886865 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85028702489 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-12-01 Created: 2017-12-01 Last updated: 2018-02-22Bibliographically approved
Björklund, G., Alricsson, M. & Svantesson, U. (2017). Using bilateral functional and anthropometric tests to define symmetry in cross-country skiers. Journal of Human Kinetics, 60(1), 9-18
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Using bilateral functional and anthropometric tests to define symmetry in cross-country skiers
2017 (English)In: Journal of Human Kinetics, ISSN 1640-5544, E-ISSN 1899-7562, Vol. 60, no 1, p. 9-18Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of this study was to evaluate the symmetry of anthropometry and muscle function in cross-country skiers and their association to vertical jumping power. Twenty cross-country skiers were recruited (21.7 ± 3.8 yrs, 180.6 ± 7.6 cm, 73.2 ± 7.6 kg). Anthropometric data was obtained using an iDXA scan. VO2max was determined using the diagonal stride technique on a ski treadmill. Bilateral functional tests for the upper and lower body were the handgrip and standing heel-rise tests. Vertical jump height and power were assessed with a counter movement jump. Percent asymmetry was calculated using a symmetry index and four absolute symmetry index levels. At a group level the upper body was more asymmetrical with regard to lean muscle mass (p = 0.022, d = 0.17) and functional strength (p = 0.019, d = 0.51) than the lower body. At an individual level the expected frequencies for absolute symmetry level indexes showed the largest deviation from zero for the heel-rise test (χ2 = 16.97, p = 0.001), while the leg lean mass deviated the least (χ2 = 0.42, p = 0.517). No relationships were observed between absolute symmetry level indexes of the lower body and counter movement jump performance (p > 0.05). As a group the skiers display a more asymmetrical upper body than lower body regarding muscle mass and strength. Interestingly at the individual level, despite symmetrical lean leg muscle mass the heel-rise test showed the largest asymmetry. This finding indicates a mismatch in muscle function for the lower body.

Keywords
Physical fitness, Body composition, Hand strength
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-30938 (URN)10.1515/hukin-2017-0107 (DOI)000418922200002 ()29339981 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85040116053 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-06-21 Created: 2017-06-21 Last updated: 2018-01-30Bibliographically approved
Norlin, T., Tranaeus Fitzgerald, U. & Alricsson, M. (2016). Barriers to and possibilities of returning to play after a severe soccer injury: a qualitative study. European Journal of Physiotherapy, 18(3), 179-184
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Barriers to and possibilities of returning to play after a severe soccer injury: a qualitative study
2016 (English)In: European Journal of Physiotherapy, ISSN 2167-9169, E-ISSN 2167-9177, Vol. 18, no 3, p. 179-184Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Soccer is the biggest sport in the world, resulting in a large number of injuries occurring in this game.Many soccer players today are ready physically, but not mentally, to return to play. The aim of thisstudy was to investigate injured players’ perception of their time after a sports injury has occurred. Thestudy was conducted using a qualitative approach. Eight soccer players, four male and four female,aged 14–25 years, were interviewed individually. The material was analysed using manifest content ana-lysis. The participants reported on various psychological aspects that affected them both positively andnegatively during the rehabilitation period. Individual factors included the injured players’ reaction,motivation and fear. Situational factors, such as their coach, the team, their family and the physiother-apist, also influenced the participants. In conclusion, several psychological factors affect young soccerplayers’ perception of rehabilitation after a severe injury. This study found that support from the teamand the coach is often lacking in a soccer player’s rehabilitation.

Keywords
Content analysis, psychological factors, sports rehabilitation
National Category
Health Sciences Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-28649 (URN)10.3109/21679169.2016.1174296 (DOI)000390400200007 ()2-s2.0-84969751458 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-08-29 Created: 2016-08-29 Last updated: 2017-11-21Bibliographically approved
Nilsson, T., Östenberg, A. H. & Alricsson, M. (2016). Injury profile among elite male youth soccer players in a Swedish first league. Journal of exercise rehabilitation, 12(2), 83-89
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Injury profile among elite male youth soccer players in a Swedish first league
2016 (English)In: Journal of exercise rehabilitation, ISSN 2288-176X, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 83-89Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study investigated the injury profile among elite male youth soccer players in a Swedish first league during two seasons. The present cohort study is based on data collected during the 2013-2014 seasons. In total, 43 young elite male soccer players, aged 15 to 19 yr, were prospectively followed regarding injuries, time of exposure, injury location, type of injury, and injury severity. The overall incidence of injury in the present study was estimated to 6.8 injuries per 1,000 exposure hours and 15.5 and 5.6 injuries per 1,000 hr for matches and training, respectively. The single most common injury subtype was muscle strain (53%). The hip and groin were the most common locations for injuries. Thirty-one percent of the injuries were classified as severe injury and caused >28 days absence from training and match play. Both the injury incidence and the number of serious injury seems to be relatively high in youth elite players according to this study. Although the injury incidence seems to be slightly lower than in adult elite players the injuries seem to be more traumatic in youth elite players.

Keywords
Junior soccer injuries, Male athletes, Sport injuries
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-28604 (URN)10.12965/jer.1632548.274 (DOI)27162769 (PubMedID)
External cooperation:
Available from: 2016-08-29 Created: 2016-08-23 Last updated: 2016-09-09Bibliographically approved
Alricsson, M., Björklund, G., Ekström, A. & Ostenberg, A. H. (2016). Introducing Tabata intervals and stability exercises in school children by a school-based study. European Journal of Public Health, 26(Issue suppl_1), 417-417
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Introducing Tabata intervals and stability exercises in school children by a school-based study
2016 (English)In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 26, no Issue suppl_1, p. 417-417Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Refereed) Published
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-30829 (URN)10.1093/eurpub/ckw174.222 (DOI)000398600404025 ()
Available from: 2017-06-09 Created: 2017-06-09 Last updated: 2018-01-16Bibliographically approved
Svensson, K., Alricsson, M., Karneback, G., Magounakis, T. & Werner, S. (2016). Muscle injuries of the lower extremity: a comparison between young and old male elite soccer players. Knee Surgery, Sports Traumatology, Arthroscopy, 24(7), 2293-2299
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Muscle injuries of the lower extremity: a comparison between young and old male elite soccer players
Show others...
2016 (English)In: Knee Surgery, Sports Traumatology, Arthroscopy, ISSN 0942-2056, E-ISSN 1433-7347, Vol. 24, no 7, p. 2293-2299Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to make a comparison between players in two age groups in an elite male soccer team regarding injury localisation within the muscle-tendon unit, injury size and muscle group in terms of muscle injuries of the lower extremity. METHODS: Cohort study based on data collected from a Swedish elite male soccer team during the seasons 2007-2012. In total, 145 muscle injuries were included. Injury localisation to the tendon or muscle, the size of haematoma and the affected muscle group were assessed using ultrasound. Age comparison was made between younger players (</=23 years) and older players (>23 years). RESULTS: No difference regarding injury localisation to either the tendon or the muscle, or the size of haematoma between the two age groups was found. However, the older group of players suffered a significantly higher number of injuries to the triceps surae than the younger players (p = 0.012). CONCLUSIONS: In a Swedish team of male soccer players at elite level, there was no difference between players 23 years or younger and players older than 23 years, in terms of injury distribution to muscles or tendons. Players older than 23 years sustained more injuries to triceps surae when compared with players 23 years or younger. The clinical relevance is to pay attention to muscle function of triceps surae in older players and to screen those players who may need an injury prevention programme. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: II.

Keywords
Lower extremity injuries, Muscle damage/injuries, Soft tissue injuries, Ultrasound
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-26002 (URN)10.1007/s00167-015-3527-6 (DOI)000379165000032 ()25668604 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84922616981 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2015-09-29 Created: 2015-09-29 Last updated: 2017-12-01Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-6653-3414

Search in DiVA

Show all publications