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Mahapatra, Krushna
Publications (10 of 63) Show all publications
Hemström, K., Mahapatra, K. & Gustavsson, L. (2013). Swedish private forest owners' perceptions and intentions with respect to adopting exotic tree species. European Journal of Forest Research, 132(3), 433-444
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Swedish private forest owners' perceptions and intentions with respect to adopting exotic tree species
2013 (English)In: European Journal of Forest Research, ISSN 1612-4669, E-ISSN 1612-4677, Vol. 132, no 3, p. 433-444Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Swedish forest growth can be increased through intensive forestry practices, enabling an increased use of forest biomass for climate-change mitigation. However, the diffusion of such practices depends on the forest owners' adoption of them. We study Swedish private forest owners' perceptions and intentions with respect to increasing forest growth by adopting exotic tree species. The results of a mail-in questionnaire survey show that although a majority of forest owners desire increasing forest growth, most owners have only a basic understanding of exotic tree species and a smaller proportion is interested in adopting them. The intention to adopt exotics seems to depend on the perceived performance of the species with respect to the economic aspects of forest management rather than on environmental or recreational concerns. Whereas a knowledge gap among the private forest owners regarding how to increase forest growth is implied, forest owners with higher self-rated knowledge of forestry and exotics have stronger intentions to adopt such species.

Keywords
private forest owners, intensive forestry, perceptions, exotics, Sweden
National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-18203 (URN)10.1007/s10342-013-0682-5 (DOI)000317422900003 ()2-s2.0-84876085494 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2013-01-09 Created: 2013-01-09 Last updated: 2018-01-11Bibliographically approved
Aabrekk, S., Tommerup, H., Svendsen, S., Mahapatra, K., Gustavsson, L., Paiho, S. & Ala-Juusela, M. (2012). Deliverable 2.2 Possible market strategies for one stop shops of renovation of single family house.: Report prepared for Nordic Innovation Centre.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Deliverable 2.2 Possible market strategies for one stop shops of renovation of single family house.: Report prepared for Nordic Innovation Centre
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2012 (English)Report (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The document describes examples of missions, visions and strategies based on the potentialpiloting models defined in report 3.2. It is based on status of interest amongst thestakeholders, and the information, figures and challenges which were discussed in the reportD 2.1 Stakeholder interests. The different service models will request different missionsdepending on the stakeholder in charge of the model. Also visions and strategies could bedifferent depending on the composition of services (core business) offered within each pilot aswell as the additional services offered by sub suppliers and the network connected to the pilot.In the report D2.1 Stakeholders interests, the following 5 different piloting models aresuggested:Type 1 Joint venture of industry, retailers and contractorsType 2 Joint venture of construction/renovation, industry and architect/engineering companiesType 3 Complementary businesses expand their business into renovationType 4 Joint venture of type house producer, bank and home owner associationType 5 Energy/building consultant, real estate agent and financing institutions, e.g. bankIn this report we have described mission, vision and market strategies for 4 existing orproposed models; The Project Manager by Bolig Enøk, from Norway (type 1), ENRA concept(type 2) and K-Rauta & Rautia (type 3) from Finland, and ProjectLavenergi (type 2) fromDenmark. Cleantech by Dong Energy (type 3) from Denmark is also addressed, but notdescribed in detail. As there is no concrete examples representing two of the models fromD2.1 (types 4 and 5), we have made a theoretical exercise in developing mission, vision andmarket strategies for type 5 model, while type 4 is not handled.It may be concluded that there are commercial actors in different parts of the value chainwhich see an opportunity in developing different approaches of “one stop shops” for energyefficient holistic renovations. The concepts are still in a development phase and differ inrespect to how they are organised (as supply side). We may say that the pilots in the differentcountries also find inspiration from each other through this research project. Due to thecomplexity of a holistic renovation project, it is a prerequisite with good partnerships even inthe development phase. In all identified models there is however one main actor taking thelead and ownership to the business model.Independent of the business model the responsible company needs to make some strategicchoices. The starting point is the SWOT analysis which sums up all major challenges for therespective business model. How the strategies should be developed is described in this report.Although the main target group for this report is companies seeing an interest in developingbusiness models for renovation, we found some important issues identified in the SWOTanalysis which the authorities may influence including lack of interest in the market (need ofmore public attention through holistic campaigns), fragmented solutions (stop subsidisingsingle measures without a holistic plan), serious vs unserious companies (need of certificationsystems to build credibility), cost focus leads to limited renovation (need of subventionschemes for holistic retrofitting including tax deduction measures) and finally lack incompetence within companies (need of support to training and collaboration acrosscompanies).

Publisher
p. 26
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-17901 (URN)
Projects
Successful Sustainable Renovation Business for Single-Family Houses - SuccessFamilies
Available from: 2012-12-18 Created: 2012-12-18 Last updated: 2012-12-19Bibliographically approved
Mahapatra, K., Gustavsson, L., Haavik, T., Aabrekk, S., Vanhoutteghem, L., Svendsen, S., . . . Ala-Juusela, M. (2012). Deliverable 3.3 Summary Report on one-stop-shop service for sustainable renovation of single family house: Report prepared for Nordic Innovation Centre.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Deliverable 3.3 Summary Report on one-stop-shop service for sustainable renovation of single family house: Report prepared for Nordic Innovation Centre
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2012 (English)Report (Other academic)
Publisher
p. 26
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-17905 (URN)
Projects
Successful Sustainable Renovation Business for Single-Family Houses - SuccessFamilies
Available from: 2012-12-18 Created: 2012-12-18 Last updated: 2012-12-19Bibliographically approved
Nair, G., Mahapatra, K. & Gustavsson, L. (2012). Implementation of energy efficient windows in Swedish single-family houses. Applied Energy, 89(1), 329-338
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Implementation of energy efficient windows in Swedish single-family houses
2012 (English)In: Applied Energy, ISSN 0306-2619, E-ISSN 1872-9118, Vol. 89, no 1, p. 329-338Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A questionnaire survey of 1010 homeowners in Jamtland and Vasternorrland, which are two counties in central Sweden, was conducted to understand the factors influencing their decision to install energy-efficient windows. We complemented this survey with an interview of 12 window sellers/installers in the county Jamtland. The annual energy cost reduction, age, and condition of the windows were the most important reasons for the window replacement decision. Approximately 80% of the respondents replaced their windows with energy-efficient windows with U-value of 1.2 W/m(2) K. Condensation problems, perceived higher prices, and lack of awareness about windows with lower U-values were important reasons for non-adoption of more energy-efficient windows. Window sellers/installers have a strong influence on homeowners' window selection that was indicated by the 97% of homeowners who bought the windows that were recommended to them. Sellers/installers revealed that they did not recommend windows with U-value of less than 1.2 W/m(2) K because they thought that investing in such windows was not economical and because windows with U-value less than 1.2 W/m(2) K could cause water condensation on the external surface of window pane.

Keywords
Energy-efficient windows; Homeowners; Installers; Sellers; Sweden; U-value
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-14394 (URN)10.1016/j.apenergy.2011.07.040 (DOI)000296114700039 ()2-s2.0-80053294916 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2011-08-25 Created: 2011-08-25 Last updated: 2017-12-08Bibliographically approved
Mahapatra, K., Gustavsson, L. & Hemström, K. (2012). Multi-storey wood-frame buildings in Germany, Sweden and the UK. Construction Innovation, 12(1), 62-85
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Multi-storey wood-frame buildings in Germany, Sweden and the UK
2012 (English)In: Construction Innovation, ISSN 1471-4175, E-ISSN 1477-0857, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 62-85Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to analyse the influence of regulations, perceptions, and promotions on the emergence of an innovation system for wood-framed multi-storey buildings in Germany, Sweden and the United Kingdom (UK). Design/methodology/approach - This descriptive paper made a qualitative analysis of information collected mainly from secondary sources such as reports, newspapers, journal publications, conference proceedings and general internet search. Findings - Results showed that the conditions for market growth of multi-storey construction seemed to be the most favourable in Sweden followed by the UK and Germany. The regulations are stringent in Germany, followed by the UK and Sweden. In all countries, the construction professionals seemed to have negative perceptions regarding engineering properties of wood. Similar negative perceptions exist among the general public in Germany and the UK, but not in Sweden. The wood construction promotional activities in Germany and the UK are directed to all types of houses, while in Sweden multi-storey buildings are targeted. Research limitations/implications - An important implication of this paper was that it highlighted the usefulness of cross-country surveys at the European level, in order to better understand observed differences in the adoption of innovative systems. However, there might be shortcomings in the comparability of the information across the countries analysed because it was difficult to make an objective assessment of the claims made in some of the information sources. Also, there was varying and limited information about the survey methodologies used in some of the reviewed studies. Practical implications - The study showed that market intervention is needed to promote radical or really new innovations such as wood construction. The variations in the promotional measures undertaken partly explained the variations in growth of wood construction system in the three countries. Originality/value - The paper applied a theoretical framework on technology transition to analyse emergence of wood construction system in Germany, Sweden and the UK. The framework can be applied to analyse the development of wood construction system in other countries also. Copyright © 2012 Emerald Group Publishing Limited. All rights reserved.

Keywords
Construction industry; Germany; Innovation system; Multi-storey buildings; Sweden; United Kingdom; Wood frames; Wood technology
National Category
Civil Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-16745 (URN)10.1108/14714171211197508 (DOI)2-s2.0-84855520888 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2012-08-20 Created: 2012-08-17 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved
Mahapatra, K., Dodoo, A., Gustavsson, L. & Nair, G. (2012). System analysis of and stakeholders’ perceptions on end-use energy efficiency measures for existing Swedish multi-family buildings. Paper presented at Second International Conference on Building Energy and Environment, August 1-4, 2012, Boulder, Colorado.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>System analysis of and stakeholders’ perceptions on end-use energy efficiency measures for existing Swedish multi-family buildings
2012 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Refereed)
National Category
Energy Systems
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-16408 (URN)
Conference
Second International Conference on Building Energy and Environment, August 1-4, 2012, Boulder, Colorado
Available from: 2012-06-11 Created: 2012-06-11 Last updated: 2012-09-03Bibliographically approved
Hemström, K., Mahapatra, K. & Gustavsson, L. (2011). Adoption of innovations in building construction: Hindrances and actor influence as perceived by Swedish architects. In: Energy efficiency first: The foundation of a low-carbon society. Paper presented at eceee 2011 Summer Study, 6-11 June 2011 (pp. 1133-1140). European Council for an Energy Efficient Economy (ECEEE)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Adoption of innovations in building construction: Hindrances and actor influence as perceived by Swedish architects
2011 (English)In: Energy efficiency first: The foundation of a low-carbon society, European Council for an Energy Efficient Economy (ECEEE), 2011, p. 1133-1140Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

A better understanding of general hindrances to the diffusion of innovations in the construction sector may help to improve the energy efficiency of buildings. This study uses a web-based questionnaire to collect information on Swedish architects’ perceptions of hindrances to the adoption of innovations in building construction. The responding architects characterise the Swedish construction industry as having a low level of innovativeness. The most influential hindrances to innovativeness were perceived as the focus on project costs instead of life-cycle costs, the economic risks that innovations imply, the focus on traditional engineering models, the construction industry’s tendency to use proven materials and methods, and contractors’ inability to adjust processes. In terms of the involved actors, construction clients were perceived to have the greatest influence on innovativeness, and stronger cooperation between the architect and construction client was recognised as important to facilitate innovativeness.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
European Council for an Energy Efficient Economy (ECEEE), 2011
National Category
Environmental Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-14309 (URN)
Conference
eceee 2011 Summer Study, 6-11 June 2011
Available from: 2011-08-15 Created: 2011-08-15 Last updated: 2013-03-13Bibliographically approved
Nair, G., Gustavsson, L. & Mahapatra, K. (2011). Barriers to implement energy efficiency investment measures in Swedish co-operative apartment buildings. In:  . Paper presented at World Renewable Energy Congress 2011, Linköping, Sweden, May 8-11.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Barriers to implement energy efficiency investment measures in Swedish co-operative apartment buildings
2011 (English)In:  , 2011Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
National Category
Other Environmental Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-13283 (URN)
Conference
World Renewable Energy Congress 2011, Linköping, Sweden, May 8-11
Available from: 2011-02-18 Created: 2011-02-18 Last updated: 2011-11-25Bibliographically approved
Vanhoutteghem, L., Tommerup, H. M., Svendsen, S., Mahapatra, K., Gustavsson, L., Haavik, T., . . . Ala-Juusela, M. (2011). Deliverable 1.2 Analysis of promising sustainable renovation concepts: Report prepared for Nordic Innovation Centre.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Deliverable 1.2 Analysis of promising sustainable renovation concepts: Report prepared for Nordic Innovation Centre
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2011 (English)Report (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The report focuses on analyses of the most promising existing sustainable renovationconcepts, i.e. full-service concepts and technical concepts, for single-family houses. As abasis for the analyses a detailed building stock analysis was carried out. Furthermore, ageneral method as proposal for package solutions for sustainable renovation is described. Themethod contains investigation of the house, proposal for sustainable renovation and detailedplanning as well as commissioning after renovation.The building stock analysis shows that detached single-family houses account for large shareof the total number of dwellings in all Nordic countries. Electric heating (and oil heating) ofsingle-family houses is very common in the Nordic countries, except for Denmark whereoil/gas boiler and district heating is mostly used. Natural ventilation is widespread inDenmark while mechanical ventilation is also often used in Norway, Sweden and Finland.Houses in Norway, Sweden and Finland are typically built with wood as a main constructionmaterial, but the insulation and/or finishing materials differ. In Denmark bricks are used as adominant construction material for cavity walls.The typical single-family houses identified to have large primary energy saving potentialalmost descend from the same time period in each Nordic country. The first segment is housesbuilt in large numbers in the 1960 and 1970. The second segment is houses built before 1940pre-war (except for Finland) where a large part of them has been renovated, but energyrenovation of those houses today would still account for a large energy saving. The thirdsegment is houses from the post-war period in Finland, houses that are all individual but builtin the same way, using the same materials.Existing full-service renovation concepts in the Nordic countries have just recently enteredthe market and are not well established and their success is yet to be evaluated. Companiesmay improve concepts by a more integrated approach and application of the full range oftechnical solutions to ensure the homeowner a sustainable renovation to a reasonable price.Energy efficiency calculations for individual measures for each of the typical single-familyhouses in the Nordic countries were made, and also some examples of cost analysis based onthe criterion of cost of conserved energy (CCE) that takes into account the investment andrunning cost and savings during a defined relevant reference period.Different technical renovation scenarios consisting of energy efficiency measures have beentested for the typical single-family houses with large energy saving potential in each of theNordic countries. Energy efficiency measures in connection with renovation of single-familyhouses have the potential for very large energy savings. In general the analyses show thattypical single-family houses can be renovated to the level of energy performance required fornew houses today or in some cases to low-energy level. Reaching passive house level may bechallenging in old houses. Passive house level was not reached in any of the analysed cases.Positive impact on the indoor environment can be expected. Thermal comfort will beimproved by insulation and air-tightness measures that will increase surface temperatures andreduce draught from e.g. badly insulated windows. A ventilation system with heat recoverywill also contribute to a good thermal comfort by draught-free supply of fresh air and assurean excellent air quality. Overheating can effectively be avoided by external movable solarshadings and/or higher venting rate by use of e.g. automatically controlled windows.

Publisher
p. 112
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-17915 (URN)
Projects
Successful Sustainable Renovation Business for Single-Family Houses - SuccessFamilies
Available from: 2012-12-19 Created: 2012-12-19 Last updated: 2012-12-19Bibliographically approved
Vanhoutteghem, L., Tommerup, H. M., Svendsen, S., Mahapatra, K., Gustavsson, L., Haavik, T., . . . Ala-Juusela, M. (2011). Deliverable 1.3 Sustainable renovation concepts for single-family houses: Report prepared for Nordic Innovation Centre.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Deliverable 1.3 Sustainable renovation concepts for single-family houses: Report prepared for Nordic Innovation Centre
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2011 (English)Report (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Due to the introduction of low energy standards for new houses as minimum requirements,rising energy prices and generally more focus on energy performance, there is a need for farreachingenergy efficiency improvements in connection with renovation if existing singlefamilyhouses in the Nordic countries are to have competitive power compared to new houseson the future housing market. If the market is able to explain this to the homeowners there isan open market with undreamt-of possibilities. Good technical solutions exist but need to becombined based on the full range of (standard) solutions in order to reach the low primaryenergy level of new houses.The typical single-family houses identified to have large primary energy saving potentialalmost descend from the same time period in each Nordic country. A complete energyefficient renovation of a typical house include post-insulation and sealing of the buildingsenvelope - roof/ceiling, façade, windows/doors and foundation and maybe slab on ground -installation of a mechanical ventilation system with high efficiency heat recovery and lowelectricity use and possibly an energy efficient heating system based on district heating, heatpump etc. This package of technical solutions can be carried out during an overall or step wiseplanned renovation dependent on the condition of the house, the financial possibilities of thehomeowner etc.Calculation of packages of energy efficient renovation solutions targeted the three segmentsof houses show that primary energy use and heating bill can be reduced with up to about 75%or a factor 4 corresponding to the level of a new house or better. It seems that the passivehouse level can not quite be reached with standard solutions. They require that moreambitious measures are applied. The total investment needed to reduce the heating bill by afactor 4 including replacement of e.g. roof and windows is up to EUR 100,000. It is generallydifficult to obtain an economy in balance in the sense that the annual payment on a cheaploan, e.g. mortgage refinancing, to finance the investment is not fully offset by the expectedannual energy savings. Since, the cost of energy measures today may not correspond to theincreased market value of the house, it is important to find mechanisms so that the total costof the energy investments in the future is reflected as an increased value of the house. Butwith due regard to all the non-energy benefits, such as better and healthier indoor environmentand comfort, and less dependence on expected future higher energy prices, energy efficientrenovation will probably still be attractive for the average homeowner.One-stop-shops in the form of full-service providers of energy efficient renovation of singlefamilyhouse are missing in the Nordic countries. This service is vital to open up the market.A one-stop-shop could be seen as a possibility to make it easy for the homeowner to complywith possible future requirements to realize far-reaching energy savings in connection withextensive renovations, provided that the building sector offers the solutions. Homeownersneed someone to take care of all relevant steps necessary for the renovation of the houseincluding quotation for the work, financing and management of the contract work. An idealfull-service concept in five phases is proposed, going from initial evaluation of the house, toextensive analyses, proposal for package solutions, coordinated execution and operation andfinally management of the house after renovation.

Publisher
p. 45
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-17918 (URN)
Projects
Successful Sustainable Renovation Business for Single-Family Houses - SuccessFamilies
Available from: 2012-12-19 Created: 2012-12-19 Last updated: 2012-12-19Bibliographically approved
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