miun.sePublications
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Publications (10 of 58) Show all publications
Lilja, J., Ingelsson, P., Snyder, K., Bäckström, I. & Hedlund, C. (2020). Metaphors we manage and develop quality by. International Journal of Quality and Service Sciences
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Metaphors we manage and develop quality by
Show others...
2020 (English)In: International Journal of Quality and Service Sciences, ISSN 1756-669X, E-ISSN 1756-6703Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Purpose: Metaphors are a powerful and human way of understanding and experiencing one kind of thing in terms of another. In quality management (QM), several metaphors are used to describe and bring to life the often-abstract QM concepts and systems. These metaphors are of great importance for how QM is understood, communicated and practiced. However, the metaphors of QM have seldom been systematically screened or put in focus, neither the topic of a critical discussion. The purpose of this paper is hence to contribute with a screening of the metaphors currently used, within QM literature and in practice among QM leaders, and then elaborate on their potential for improvement and development. Design/methodology/approach: The paper is based on a literature review combined with interviews of QM leaders. Findings: The paper highlights that the current QM metaphors provide intuitive associations to properties such as stability, shelter, and structure, but not to the important dynamic properties of QM, such as learning, or to the critical role of people in QM. What can be seen as core properties of QM are communicated by texts or labels added on to metaphors with properties that often are in sharp contrast to them. The paper also provides suggestions for further improvements and development. Originality/value: The paper highlights the area of metaphors within QM as an important area for future research. It also provides insights concerning the successful use and selection of metaphors in future QM practice. 

Keywords
Appreciative inquiry, Change management, Communicative leadership, Generativity, Leadership, Lean leadership, Lean management, Metaphors, Quality management
National Category
Reliability and Maintenance
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-39016 (URN)10.1108/IJQSS-04-2019-0060 (DOI)000529697800001 ()2-s2.0-85084202299 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2020-05-13 Created: 2020-05-13 Last updated: 2020-05-15Bibliographically approved
Lilja, J., Hansen, D. & Richardsson, D. (2019). Accelerating sustainable society and a flourishing Scandinavia through a living and communicating network of AI-summits. In: : . Paper presented at 2019 World Appreciative Inquiry Conference, 19th to 22nd March, Nice, France, 2019.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Accelerating sustainable society and a flourishing Scandinavia through a living and communicating network of AI-summits
2019 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The need for a radical transformation of society, business and way of life towards sustainability is by now widely accepted and acknowledged in the Mid Scandinavian region. This transformation also occurs as a major objective in the UN Sustainable Development Goals, both nationally and locally. However, after creating awareness, moving from knowing to doing is now the real challenge. Pushing for sustainability in strategies and visions, or even providing extensive funding for projects related to sustainable development is not doing the job fast enough. One obvious reason being that the more sustainable ideas and solutions of the future do require new levels of systems thinking and solutions on the level of the “whole system”. That in turn is dependent on connections and relations across traditional silos and organizational borders that currently does not exist. Therefore, stakeholders from Sweden and Norway are currently experimenting together on using a living and communicating network of Appreciative Inquiry Summits to accelerate sustainable, circular, and flourishing development in Scandinavia. The initiative is designed as an innovation project with hands-on exploring, prototyping, as well as researching how to accelerate the desired transformation. The project, called SMICE, is inspired by the “whole system in the room” approach of the amazing initiative “Sustainable Cleveland 2019”. However, as the context of this initiative is a large sparsely populated region, including also several countries, the set up now evolving is moving beyond just one annual big AI-summit towards more of a distributed system, “ecosystem”, or network of AI-summits and other resources that live, communicate and relate to each other continuously. During this presentation we will share our progress made, results, learnings, challenges, insights, and practices from our exciting and important journey so far.

National Category
Reliability and Maintenance
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-36067 (URN)
Conference
2019 World Appreciative Inquiry Conference, 19th to 22nd March, Nice, France, 2019
Funder
Interreg Sweden-Norway, 20201304
Available from: 2019-04-30 Created: 2019-04-30 Last updated: 2019-06-05Bibliographically approved
Hansen, D. & Lilja, J. (2019). Complexity Quality Management: Enabling Leadership, Adaptive Space & Metaphors. In: : . Paper presented at 22nd QMOD conference, 13-15 October 2019, Krakow, Poland.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Complexity Quality Management: Enabling Leadership, Adaptive Space & Metaphors
2019 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Purpose

Most organizations experience the complexity and tensions between producing and innovating. In order to adapt to the future, these organizations need enabling leadership that creates adaptive space to facilitate and enable the necessary change process for renewal. This ability is necessary for 21st century TQM, i.e., the Emergence TQM paradigm. Guiding images such as metaphors have been suggested to support transformative change, but have only received limited research. This paper investigates the role of guiding images as a facilitating tool for leading organizational adaptability and contribute to future leadership practices of QM.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper studies three cases of organizations that were under pressure from the outside to make decisions about how to innovate. The paper studies the management team at each organization while they tackle tensions and make decisions about what to do while using a generative image to support the leadership process. The researchers gained access to key meetings to study the processes through observations that were later analyzed with the use of storyboards.

Findings

The leadership processes of handling organizational adaptability can be facilitated by guiding images. The images can be generated while managers experience tension and can help support the leadership processes of conflicting and connecting. Three types of guiding images were identified.

Originality/value

The paper contributes with practical knowledge about how to enabling organizational adaptability by supporting enabling leadership processes. Furthermore, the paper contributes to complex adaptive leadership theory in the context of quality management.

Keywords
Leadership, Complexity, Ambidexterity, Metaphors
National Category
Reliability and Maintenance
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-38076 (URN)
Conference
22nd QMOD conference, 13-15 October 2019, Krakow, Poland
Funder
Interreg Sweden-Norway
Available from: 2019-12-13 Created: 2019-12-13 Last updated: 2019-12-16Bibliographically approved
Stenmark, P. & Lilja, J. (2019). Drumming as a Key to Quality Improvement Action in the Emergence Paradigm of TQM. In: : . Paper presented at 22nd QMOD conference, 13-15 October 2019, Krakow, Poland.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Drumming as a Key to Quality Improvement Action in the Emergence Paradigm of TQM
2019 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The success factors in quality management and improvement work are context-specific, and the context is changing. In addition to rapid change, the future is increasingly calling for new abilities in completeness, improving and developing quality in truly complex systems. The urgent challenges to make the world more sustainable is clearly pushing this agenda. The United Nation's 17 sustainable development goals (SDGs) require, by definition, improvements to be made on the scale of the whole; the goals, like their solutions, are often complex and dynamically interconnected. Hence, sustainable development requires a system view, lessons to be learned from leading complexity, and cross-border collaboration that allows the treatment and improvement of the whole as a unit. This urgently needed mindset and practice has recently been referred to as the fourth “emergence” paradigm of TQM.

Thus, emergence points to the need for collective intelligence rather than experts having the answers. This also implies that solutions and improvements cannot be imposed; rather, they arise from probing, sensing and an interplay with the complex context. In short, the understanding and improvement of quality becomes a participatory process of continuous dialogue including “the whole system” for all stakeholders. Consequently, what works to manage and improve quality is different in this emergence paradigm of TQM. Being practical, one of the specific methods that is then recommended as a complement to the TQM toolbox is the change method known as Appreciative Inquiry (AI). AI has been used for more than three decades and has repeatedly indicated its potential as a successful method for engaging and driving improvements and rapid change on the scale of the whole. The method has evolved and been refined towards perfection in regard to the design of events, processes and meeting places that successfully connect and initiate cross-border improvement and development initiatives. One of the most powerful practices for this approach is known as the AI summit. However, from a QM perspective, it is what happens after the summit that truly makes a difference. This is when a wide spectrum of improvement ideas and initiatives around which people have self-organized is realized, or not, in a dynamic process of emergent change. This critical phase of keeping the momentum alive is referred to as the “drum” phase, and in it, of all of the AI summit phases, there is the least agreement, guidance or support for what happens after the AI summit event. 

The purpose of this paper is to advance towards the called-for emergence paradigm of TQM by exploring the emergent drum phase of the Appreciative Inquiry method.

National Category
Reliability and Maintenance
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-37936 (URN)
Conference
22nd QMOD conference, 13-15 October 2019, Krakow, Poland
Available from: 2019-12-09 Created: 2019-12-09 Last updated: 2019-12-11Bibliographically approved
Lilja, J., Hansen, D., Richardsson, D. & Svedin, I. (2019). How Quality Management Needs Emergence for Engaging Agenda 2030: As “improving” increasingly means getting a complex system to take transformative steps towards sustainability and flourishing. In: : . Paper presented at 22nd QMOD conference, 13-15 October 2019, Krakow, Poland.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>How Quality Management Needs Emergence for Engaging Agenda 2030: As “improving” increasingly means getting a complex system to take transformative steps towards sustainability and flourishing
2019 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Purpose

If not now, when? The UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) are getting increasing attention, and there is an acknowledgement that the challenges ahead, as well as the solutions needed, often are complex. In contrast, the historical strengths of Quality Management (QM) have been in situations when cause-effect relations can be analyzed and understood, when technical expertise can provide the answer, where the application of “best practice” is helpful, where order is a virtue. When dealing with complexity, leaders who are tempted to impose this kind of command-and-control style will often fail. Success rather comes from setting the stage, stepping back a bit, allowing patterns to emerge, curiously tracking what takes place, spreading what is being learned, and scaling up success. Such a leadership and practice has been referred to as the fourth and called for “Emergence Paradigm” of QM. The purpose of this paper is to contribute with knowledge concerning how the Emergence Paradigm of QM comes into play when getting organizations and the world to take action on Agenda 2030.

Methodology/Approach

The paper is based on dialogic action research and presents the case and emergent process of 60 Swedish authorities getting to collective action on Agenda 2030.

Findings

The paper highlights how QM may contribute to realizing the Agenda 2030 by dynamically combining the strengths of the past paradigms with new practices and mind-sets related to complexity and emergence.

Value of the paper

The paper provides new insights that may help to take the bold and transformative steps urgently needed to shift the world onto a sustainable and resilient path.

Keywords
Quality Management, Sustainable Development, Agenda 2030, Complex systems, Organizational adaptability, Complexity Leadership, Emergence.
National Category
Reliability and Maintenance
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-38075 (URN)
Conference
22nd QMOD conference, 13-15 October 2019, Krakow, Poland
Projects
SMICE
Funder
Interreg Sweden-Norway
Available from: 2019-12-13 Created: 2019-12-13 Last updated: 2019-12-16Bibliographically approved
Palm, K. & Lilja, J. (2019). Innovation Lab 2030: Finding out how to Move Towards the Agenda 2030 Together in a Complex Alliance of Swedish Authorities. In: : . Paper presented at IRSPM 2019 Conference - Renewing Public Management for Stewardship, Innovation and Impact, April 16-18, 2019, Wellington, New Zealand..
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Innovation Lab 2030: Finding out how to Move Towards the Agenda 2030 Together in a Complex Alliance of Swedish Authorities
2019 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This article describes cooperation between authorities and universities in order toincrease innovation capacity and thereby achieve change in performance and executionfor better contribution to a sustainable future. Through action research, the authors havedeveloped new knowledge about results, success factors and obstacles for increasinginnovation capacity. The paper recognizes that administrative and adaptive leadershipmust work together effectively if organizations are to function properly. There is a needfor a dynamic relationship between the formal and the informal in organizations– between top-down administrative forces and complex adaptive emergent forces. Thereis a need for a wider range and simultaneous use of management models adapted todifferent contexts and needs.

Keywords
Complexity; leadership; bureaucracy; sustainable development; innovation management
National Category
Reliability and Maintenance
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-36066 (URN)
Conference
IRSPM 2019 Conference - Renewing Public Management for Stewardship, Innovation and Impact, April 16-18, 2019, Wellington, New Zealand.
Projects
InnovationLab2030
Funder
Vinnova
Available from: 2019-04-30 Created: 2019-04-30 Last updated: 2019-06-18Bibliographically approved
Lilja, J., Hansen, D. & Richardsson, D. (2019). The Best After Summit Drumming Ever: Sharing and co-creating on how to keep the generative connections alive and get progress after AI-Summits -“Drumming, dancing and doing”. In: : . Paper presented at World Appreciative Inquiry Conference 2019, 19th to 22nd March, 2019, Nice, France..
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Best After Summit Drumming Ever: Sharing and co-creating on how to keep the generative connections alive and get progress after AI-Summits -“Drumming, dancing and doing”
2019 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
National Category
Reliability and Maintenance
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-36065 (URN)
Conference
World Appreciative Inquiry Conference 2019, 19th to 22nd March, 2019, Nice, France.
Available from: 2019-04-30 Created: 2019-04-30 Last updated: 2019-05-08Bibliographically approved
Bäckström, I., Ingelsson, P., Snyder, K., Hedlund, C. & Lilja, J. (2018). Capturing value-based leadership in practice: Insights from developing and applying an AI-interview guide. International Journal of Quality and Service Sciences, 10(4), 422-430
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Capturing value-based leadership in practice: Insights from developing and applying an AI-interview guide
Show others...
2018 (English)In: International Journal of Quality and Service Sciences, ISSN 1756-669X, E-ISSN 1756-6703, Vol. 10, no 4, p. 422-430Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to present and discuss the results from the appreciative inquiry (AI)-inspired interviews to explore the underlying values held by top managers and to identify soft aspects ofleadership.Design/methodology/approach – Top managers were interviewed as a part of a research project withthe aim to support the development of value-based leadership that integrates company values, organizationalculture, customer needs and sustainable development. A structured interview guide, inspired by AI, wasdeveloped and used to pinpoint their motivation and vision of a good organization to understand the valuesthat the managers had and to identify soft aspects of leadership. The interviews were analyzed in workshopswith the whole research teamand structured and visualized through affinity diagrams.Findings – The results showed the underlying values held by top managers and identified soft aspects ofleadership.Practical implications – The presented interview guide can be used to identify the top managers’underlying values, and the presented results from the interviews can be used to inspire other managers andleaders to develop their leadership in their striving of good leadership and effective organizations.Originality/value – The paper explains how to apply an AI-inspired interview guide in finding out valuebasedleadership and soft aspects of leadership for enhancing organizational culture.

Keywords
Values, Leadership, Appreciative Inquiry, Organizational culture, Value-based
National Category
Reliability and Maintenance
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-34562 (URN)10.1108/IJQSS-01-2018-0004 (DOI)000447318700006 ()2-s2.0-85050189979 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-10-01 Created: 2018-10-01 Last updated: 2019-03-27Bibliographically approved
Boström, J., Hillborg, H. & Lilja, J. (2018). Exploring Cultural Dynamics and Tensions when Applying Design Thinking for Improving Healthcare Quality: What is really going on?. In: Su Mi Park-Daahlgard (Ed.), Proceedings of the 21th QMOD Conference: Building a Culture for Quality, Innovation and Sustainability. Paper presented at 21st QMOD conference on quality and service science ICQSS, 22-24 August 2018, Cardiff University, Wales, UK.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Exploring Cultural Dynamics and Tensions when Applying Design Thinking for Improving Healthcare Quality: What is really going on?
2018 (English)In: Proceedings of the 21th QMOD Conference: Building a Culture for Quality, Innovation and Sustainability / [ed] Su Mi Park-Daahlgard, 2018Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Purpose:

The purpose of this paper is to contribute knowledge concerning the dynamics and potential cultural tensions that occur when applying user involvement and design thinking for improving quality in a healthcare setting.

Method:

The paper is based on a case study following a quality improvement project (QI) in a medium sized Swedish county council in the field of somatic care. The project involved eight healthcare professionals, one designer, four patients and two relatives. A multiple data collection method over a period of 10 months was used. It included individual interviews, e-mail correspondence and observations of workshops that covered the QI project.

Findings:

The result shows tensions between QI work and the daily clinical work of the participants. These tensions primarily concern the conflict between fast and slow processes, the problem of moving between different fields of knowledge, being a resource for the individual clinic and the system, and the participants' expectations and assumptions about roles and responsibilities in a QI project. Furthermore these findings could be interpreted as signs of a development culture in the healthcare context.

Practical Implications:

There are several practical implications. Among others, the insights can inspire how to approach and contextualize the current concepts, roles and methods of design thinking and user involvement so that they can be more easily understood and integrated into the existing culture and way of working in the healthcare sector.

Originality:

The study provides a unique insight into a case, trying to uncover what actually is going on, and perhaps why certain things are not happening at all, when user involvement and design practices are applied for improving healthcare quality.

Keywords
Patient Involvement, Quality Improvement, Professionals, Culture, Service Design; Project management
National Category
Reliability and Maintenance
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-34920 (URN)
Conference
21st QMOD conference on quality and service science ICQSS, 22-24 August 2018, Cardiff University, Wales, UK
Available from: 2018-11-20 Created: 2018-11-20 Last updated: 2018-12-06Bibliographically approved
Hansen, D., Lilja, J. & Jørgensen, R. (2018). How Positive Practices at Work can Accelerate Transformation to a Lean Improvement Culture and Improve Organizational Effectiveness. In: BOOK OF ABSTRACTS: 9th European Conference on Positive Psychology. Paper presented at 9th European Conference on Positive Psychology, June 27–30, 2018, Budapest, Hungary.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>How Positive Practices at Work can Accelerate Transformation to a Lean Improvement Culture and Improve Organizational Effectiveness
2018 (English)In: BOOK OF ABSTRACTS: 9th European Conference on Positive Psychology, 2018Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Organizations striving for operational excellence face new challenges in a world increasingly characterized by volatility, uncertainty, complexity, and ambiguity [1]. For decades, one of the answers to achieving operational excellence has been to pursue a continuous improvement culture such as through the Lean philosophy in order to engage and empower employees to continuously optimize resource utilization and thereby increase competitiveness [2]. However, many organizations only get short-term gains out of their efforts and fail with an actual Lean transformation and frequently, cultural change is mentioned as the hardest to manage [3]. At all organizational levels, people get under pressure that frequently leads to behavior un-favoring long-term excellence and certainly inhibiting continuous improvement culture. Psychological mechanisms induced by fear and high tempo are possible explanations.

This paper aims for investigating whether positive practices at work [4] can accelerate transformation to a Lean improvement culture and contribute to improved organizational effectiveness.

The study was carried out as an exploratory case study. The selected organization was identified due to its history with experimenting with positive practices and explicit focus on and strategic need for developing a Lean improvement culture. During the study, the researchers had extensive access to investigate daily operational improvement practices at the manufacturing plant. First, all improvement practices were mapped and the positive practices identified. Second, the improvement practices were analysed to assess their impact on developing Lean improvement culture together with a discussion of the difference between traditional improvement practices and the identified positive practices. Third, the positive practices with the highest assessed impact were further analysed in depth to investigate to what degree they also contributed to organizational effectiveness.

 

References

1. Bennett, N. & Lemoine, G. J. (2014). What VUCA really means for you. Harvard Business Review, 92(1), 27.

2. Arlbjørn, J. S. & Freytag, P. V. (2013). Evidence of lean: a review of international peer-reviewed journal articles. International Journal of Operations and Production Management, 25(2), 174-205.

3. Liker, J. K. (2004). The Toyota Way. New York: McGraw-Hill.

4. Cameron, K., Mora, C., Leutscher, T. & Calarco, M. (2011). Effects of Positive Practices on Organizational Effectiveness. Journal of Applied Behavioral Science, 47(3), 266-308.

Keywords
Positive Practices, Continuous Improvement, Improvement Culture, Strengths-based, Lean
National Category
Reliability and Maintenance
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-34483 (URN)
Conference
9th European Conference on Positive Psychology, June 27–30, 2018, Budapest, Hungary
Available from: 2018-09-24 Created: 2018-09-24 Last updated: 2018-09-24Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-5431-0392

Search in DiVA

Show all publications